July 24-30, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
mmbiztoday.com July 24-30, 2014| Vol 2, Issue 29MYANMAR’S FIRST BIL...
July 24-30, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
2LOCAL BIZ
Business News in Brief
MYANMAR’S FIRST BILINGUAL BUSINES...
July 24-30, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
3
July 24-30, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
LOCAL BIZ 4
Myanmar Summary
Myanmar Summary
YCDCtoBanStreetVendorsf...
July 24-30, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
LOCAL BIZ 5
Myanmar Summary
Myanmar Summary
Air Mandalay to Buy Up ...
July 24-30, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
LOCAL BIZ 6
Myanmar Summary
Government Inspects Manufacturing
Busin...
July 24-30, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
7
Myanmar Summary
Myanmar Summary
LOCAL BIZ
MyanmaRailwaystoInvite
...
July 24-30, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
LOCAL BIZ 8
Myanmar Summary
Banking Conference Focuses on
Local Ban...
July 24-30, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
LOCAL BIZ 9
Myanmar Summary
Scotch Whisky Gets Special Legal
Protec...
July 24-30, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
LOCAL BIZ 10
Myanmar Summary
Myanmar Summary
Myanmar’s Legal Framew...
July 24-30, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
LOCAL BIZ 11
Rubber Farmers Seek Gov’t
Htun Htun Minn
M
yanmar’s ru...
July 24-30, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
mmbiztoday.com
LOCAL BIZ 12
Myanmar Summary
Myanmar Summary
UNtoHelpMyanmarPrepare...
July 24-30, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
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REGIONAL BIZ 13
Myanmar Summary
Samsung Halts Business with Chinese...
July 24-30, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
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REGIONAL BIZ 14
Myanmar Summary
China Urges Local Governments to Bu...
July 24-30, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
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REGIONAL BIZ 15
Myanmar Summary
Myanmar Summary
Shamim Adam
M
alays...
July 24-30, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
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INTERNATIONAL BIZ 16
Myanmar Summary
Myanmar Summary
Deal in Brazil...
July 24-30, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
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INTERNATIONAL BIZ 17
Myanmar Summary
Mal Langsdon
I
nsurers are eag...
July 24-30, 2014
Myanmar Business Today
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INVESTMENT & FINANCE 18
Myanmar Summary
Vietnam’s Biggest Pharmaceu...
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 29
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 29
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 29
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 29
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 29
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 29
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 29
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 29
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 29
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 29
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 29
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 29
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 29
Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 29
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Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 29

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Myanmar Business Today is Myanmar’s first and the only bilingual (English-Myanmar) business newspaper, distributed in both Myanmar and Thailand. MBT covers a range of news encompassing local business stories, special reports and in-depth analysis focusing on Myanmar’s nascent economy, investment and finance, business opportunities, foreign trade, property and real estate, automobile, among others. MBT also provides detailed coverage of regional (ASEAN) and international business stories. For more information please visit www.mmbiztoday.com.
Facebook: www.facebook.com/MyanmarBusinessToday Twitter: @mmbiztoday
Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/107379179269023670071/posts
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Myanmar Business Today - Vol 2, Issue 29

  1. 1. July 24-30, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com mmbiztoday.com July 24-30, 2014| Vol 2, Issue 29MYANMAR’S FIRST BILINGUAL BUSINESS JOURNAL Myanmar Summary Inside MBT Education Reform: Lessons for the Future P-21 Miners Face Permit Delays As Parliament Debates New Bill Phyo Thu M yanmar’s min- ing enterprises are facing delays in receiving permits af- ter a newly proposed bill aimed at relaxing the cen- tral government’s exclusive control over mining opera- tions in the country stirred debate in the parliament. TheMineralandResource Committee of the Upper House recently drafted a new mining bill and submit- ted it to the Lower House. The Bill Committee of the Lower House said a provi- sion in the bill that allows joint mining operations between the central and regional governments goes against the country’s consti- tution. “We need to discuss fur- ther as [the new bill] con- tradicts the constitution,” told Dr Soe Moe Aung, a member of the Bill Com- mittee. Dr Soe Moe Aung said the newly proposed bill must be closely analysed to ensure regional gov- ernment mining doesn’t undercut the country’s constitutional framework. State and regional govern- ments will discuss the pro- posal in their respective parliaments to resolve the dispute, he said. A mine operator from Kayah state told Myan- mar Business Today that quests will be delayed by the government’s revision process. “The delay to get min- the development of special areas,” he said, referring to Myanmar’s underdevel- states such as Kachin and Kayah, which are rich in mineral resources. In June, Myanmar was accepted as a “candidate country” to the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) which requires the union gov- ernment to disclose the agreements between the state and mining compa- nies to the public. Ko Win Aung from the multi-stake holder group that is coordinating My- anmar’s accession into the EITI, an international standard that ensures transparency around countries’ oil, gas and mineral resources, said his group doesn’t accept constitutional restrictions preventing regional gov- ernments from operating spective states. “These restrictions should not exist,” Ko Win Aung told Myanmar Business Today. The EITI requires My- anmar government to produce social impact as- sessment reports and en- sure that any mining bill passed takes into account all industry stakeholders. ,cifowåKwGif;Oya'udk acwf ESifhtnDjyifqifcsdefwGif owåKwGif; vkyfvkyfief;vkyfudkifcGifhtwGuf tcsdef MuefYMumrIrsm;jzpfay:aeNyD; tcuftcJjzpfay:vsuf&dSaMumif; owåKwl;azmfa&;vkyfief; rsm;rSod& onf/ vuf&SdwGif owåKwGif;Oya'udk jyifqifrIrSmoufqdkif&mvTwfawmf rsm;twGif; aqG;aEG;rIrsm; jyKvkyf &OD;rnfjzpfNyD; wdkif;a'oBuD;ESifh jynfe,ftpdk;&tzGJUrsm;u vkyf udkifcGifhay;Edkifa&;rSmvnf; tajccH Oya'ESifhnDñGwfrIr&SdaMumif; yg&Sd ojzifhaqG;aEG;rnfhtqifhwGifom &Sdaeao;aMumif; jynfolUvTwf awmfOya'Murf;aumfrwDrS od& onf/ jrefrmhowåKwGif;Oya'udkt rsKd;om;vTwfawmfowåKESihf o,H ZmwaumfrwDua&;qGJwifoGif; cJhumjynfolUvTwfawmfOya' Murf;aumfrwDutajccHOya' ESifhrnDaomoufqdkif&mjynf e,fESifhwdkif;a'oBuD;rS tpdk;& tzGJUESifhoufqdkif&m0efBuD;XmerS ñTefrSL;ygonfhtzGJUrSwl;azmfcGifh ay;&efqdkonfhtcsufudkaxmuf jycJhjcif;jzpfonf/ jrefrmEdkifiHowåKwGif;vkyfief; rsm;twGif; tm;enf;csuftjzpf &Sdaeaom ETA/ SIA xkwfjyef rIrsm;udk EITI EdkifiHtjzpf&Sdvm csdefwGif oufqdkif&mtpD&ifcHpm rsm;jyKpkumaqmif&GufoGm;&rnf jzpfum jrefrmhowåKOya'jyifqif onfh owåKOya'Murf;xGufay: a&;twGufvnf; vTwfawmfrsm; twGif;xyfrHaqG;aEG;&OD;rnf jzpfonf/ Government Inspects Manufacturing Businesses for Licences P-6 Labour Requirements Growing Throughout Myanmar P-7 A woman digs for sulphur sand near a Chinese copper mining dump in Sarlingyi township at Sagaing division. SoeZeyaTun/Reuters
  2. 2. July 24-30, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com 2LOCAL BIZ Business News in Brief MYANMAR’S FIRST BILINGUAL BUSINESS JOURNAL Board of Editors Editor-in-Chief - Sherpa Hossainy Email - sherpa.hossainy@gmail.com Deputy Editor - Aundrea Montaño Email - aundrea.montano@gmail.com Editor-in-Charge - Wai Linn Kyaw Email - linnkhant18@gmail.com Ph - 09 40 157 9090 Regional Editor - Tom Stayner International Editor - David Ross Reporters & Contributors Htun Htun Minn, May Soe San, Kyaw Min, Wai Linn Kyaw, Aye Myat, Aung Phyo, Zwe Wai, Phyo Thu, David Mayes, Sherpa Hossainy, Aundrea Montaño, Tom Stayner, David Ross, Jacob Goldberg Art & Design Zarni Min Naing (Circle) Email - zarni.circle@gmail.com Ko Naing Email - nzlinn.13@gmail.com DTP May Su Hlaing Translators Aye Chan Wynn, Wai Linn Kyaw, Phyu Maung Advertising Seint Seint Aye, Moe Hsann Pann, Htet Wai Yan, Zin Wai Oo, Nay Lin Htike Advertising Hotline - 09 420 237 625, 09 4211 567 05, 09 31 450 345, 09 250 411 911, 09 2500 18646 Email - sales.mbtweekly@gmail.com Managing Director Prasert Lekavanichkajorn pkajorn@hotmail.com 09421149720 Publisher U Myo Oo (04622) No. 1A-3, Myintha 11th Street, South Okkalapa Township, Yangon. Tel: 951-85000 86, 8500 763 Fax: 951-8603288 ext: 007 Shwe Naing Ngan Printing (04193) Printing Subscription & Circulation Aung Khin Sint - aksint2008@gmail.com 09 20 435 59 Nilar Myint - manilarmyint76@gmail.com 09 4210 855 11 Khaing Zaw Hnin - snowkz34@gmail.com 09 4211 30133 Myanma Airways signs for six ATR 72s 600s, by placing orders for six of the type and options on six more at the Farnborough air show last week. The state-owned carrier, which is to branded Myan- mar National Airlines soon, will start taking delivery of the aircraft in 2015. Deliveries will run until 2017. The airline aims to replace its Fokker F28 regional jet and Xian Aircraft MA60 turboprop with the ATRs, while it already operates three ATR72s. Myanmar pharma sector expected to grow 10- 15pc Myanmar’s pharmaceutical industry is expected to grow 10-15 percent a year due to higher government spending on healthcare, the Myanmar Pharmaceuti- cal and Medical Equipment Entrepreneurs Association said at an expo. Myanmar’s pharmaceuticals market is now estimated to be worth about $100 million to $120 million, but the industry imports more than 90 percent of the products. Indian suppliers enjoy the largest share at 35.4 percent, followed by Thailand, China, Pakistan, Bangladesh, South Korea and Indonesia. About 60 per- cent of all products are sold in Yangon and Mandalay. There are only 10 domestic manufacturers. South Korean owner sued for closing factory without compensation South Korean owner of Master Sports Shoe Factory, in Hlaing Tharyar Industrial Zone outside Yangon, for closing it without paying compensation to the workers, local media reported. Over 800 workers staged a pro- test march in front of the South Korean Embassy last compensation. Japan eyes Myanmar for raw rubber Japan is to provide state of the art technology to process new supply for its tyre manufacturing industry. According to an agreement between the Myanmar Rubber Planters and Producers Association and Japanese manufacturers, Japan will provide technology to produce high-quality raw rubber in Yangon, Bago and Mon regions in return for ex- ports. Japanese tyre production needs between 700,000 and 800,000 tonnes of rubber a year. Shwedagon Pagoda Visitor Number Goes Up 14pc in Q1 The number of foreign tourists visiting Yangon’s half of 2014, up 30,000 from the same period last year, according to the pagoda’s Board of Trustees. During the six-month period, visitors in January topped with 50,398, followed by February with 60,691 and March with 49,599. Thai visitors accounted for the most. The entrance fee for foreign visitors was $8, taking the total earning from the tourists to $1.96 million during the period. MAPCO to sell K5b worth of shares Myanma Agro-business Public Co (MAPCO) will sell K5 billion worth of shares over the counter by end-July, local media reported managing director Ye Min Aung of MAPCO as saying. Each Myanmar citizen can buy shares worth up to K1 billion at K10,800 per each, he said. MAPCO, which is expected to be listed when the stock market begins operations in Yangon next year, sold about one billion worth of shares last year. China remains top FDI contributor China continues to be the leading foreign investor in Myanmar with more than $14 billion of cumulative investment as of the end of June, according to the Di- rectorate of Investment and Company Administration (DICA). Foreign companies have so far invested more than $46.71 billion in 12 sectors, including oil and gas, manufacturing, mining, hotels and tourism, transport - culture, construction and services. Energy sector has received the most foreign investment, about 41 percent of the total, DICA data shows. Thailand is the second largest foreign investor country. Myanmar Summary jrefrmhavaMumif;vdkif;onf ATR72-600 av,mOfrsm;tm; pdwf0ifpm;vsuf&SdaMumif;udk xdktrsKd;pm;av,mOfajcmufpif;twGuf rSm,lrIjyKvkyfjcif;ESifh NyD;cJhonfhoDwif;ywf Farnborough avaMumif; jyyGJwGif ajcmufpif;udk a&G;cs,frIjyKjcif;wdkUjzifh twnfjyKay;cJhaMumif; od&onf/jrefrmtrsKd;om;avaMumif;vdkif;tjzpfrMumrDtrnfajymif;rnf jzpfonfh EdkifiHydkifavaMumif;vdkif;onf xdkav,mOfrsm;udk 2015 ckESpf twGif;wGif pwifvufcH ,loGm;rnfjzpfum ydkYaqmifvTJajymif;rIrSm 2017 ckESpftxd Mumjrifhrnfjzpfonf/ jrefrmEdkifiH aq;0g;vkyfief;u@rSm tpdk;& usef;rma&;u@ tay: aiGaMu;oHk;pGJrIaMumifh 10 rS 15 &mckdif EIef;tMum; wdk;wuf vmrnf[k od&onf/ jrefrmhaq;0g;u@aps;uGufrSm vuf&SdwGif wefzdk;tm;jzifh a':vm oef; 100 ESifh 120 Mum;&SdNyD; aps;uGufwGif;&Sd ukefypönf; 90 &mcdkifEIef;rSm jynfyrS wifoGif;jcif;jzpfaMumif; od&onf/ vIdifom,mpufrIZkef&Sd Master Sports zdeyfpuf½Hkydkif&Sif awmif udk&D;,m;vlrsKd;wpfOD;tm; tvkyform;rsm;udk avsmfaMu;ray;bJ puf½Hkydwfodrf;cJhjcif;aMumifh tvkyform;0efBuD;Xmeu w&m;pGJqdk xm;aMumif; jynfwGif;owif;Xmersm;u azmfjyxm;onf/ NyD;cJhonfh Mumoyaw;aeYwGif tvkyform; 800 ausmfcefY awmifudk&D;,m; oH½kH;a&SUodkY vrf;avQmufcsDwufqE´jycJhaMumif; od&onf/
  3. 3. July 24-30, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com 3
  4. 4. July 24-30, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com LOCAL BIZ 4 Myanmar Summary Myanmar Summary YCDCtoBanStreetVendorsfromSeptember Htun Htun Minn T he Yangon City De- velopment Commit- tee (YCDC) has an- nounced that beginning in September street vendors will be banned in 33 town- ships that make up YCDC’s territory. Currently, street vendors are allowed to setup stalls on the pavement between the hours of 3-9 pm. YCDC said street vendors and stalls are causing dis- ruptions to passing pedes- trians, contributing to traf- waste disposals, which in turn deteriorates hygiene in the surrounding area and blocks the sewage sys- tem. “We are planning to ar- range a space for vendors to sell in the downtown area. We will clear them from the streets for the convenience of pedestri- from the YCDC markets division. Thebanhasbeenplanned with good intentions; how- ever, it will hurt their live- lihoods and income, street vendors said. “It is not easy to allocate selling spaces to all the street vendors in Yangon. If selling on the streets is completely banned, we will ends meet,” a vendor who runs a stall on Anawrahta road, said. However, downtown res- idents say there are both advantages and disadvan- tages to having vendors on the street. “They sell goods and foods with reasonable pric- es at convenient places, but they also disturb the pas- serby. Sometimes walking space is so blocked that only one person can pass through at a time,” a resi- dent of downtown Yangon said. There has been a plan to open a night market for street vendors near Maha- bandoola Park in the past, but this has yet to be real- ised. Currently, there are over 70,000 street vendors, with over 300,000 de- pendent family members, making a living on the streets of Yangon, accord- ing to surveys. The high number of street vendors is partially attributed to the lack of job opportunities avail- able, leaving the poor with few options but to choose convenient roadside sell- ing of goods and foods as employment. “There are also street vendors in other countries. Neighbouring Thailand is even famous for roadside and night markets, which are popular tourist at- tractions. But the vendors there are about health and hygiene and don’t irre- sponsibly dispose of their waste. “Here YCDC workers face the big task of clearing heaps of waste left by the vendors,” said a city pro- ject planner. Starting in September, 2014 ckESpf pufwifbmvrS pí &efukefNrdKUawmfpnfyife,fed rdwftwGif;&Sd NrdKUe,f 33 NrdKUe,f wGifaps;a&mif;csvsuf&Sdonfhvrf; ab;aps;onfrsm;udk vHk;0aps; a&mif;cscGifhjyKawmhrnfr[kwf aMumif; &efukefNrdKUawmfpnfyif om,ma&;aumfrwDu aMunm cJhonf/ vuf&SdtcsdefwGif &efukefNrdKU awmfpnfyifom,ma&;aumfrwD rS vrf;ab;aps;onfrsm;tm; aeYvnf 3 em&DrS n 9 em&Dtxd aps;a&mif;cscGifhay;xm;aomfvnf; jynfolrsm; oGm;vma&;cufcJjcif;? ,mOfaMumydwfqdkYrIrsm;jzpfay: aejcif;?ywf0ef;usifoefY&Sif;rIydkrdk qdk;&Gm;vmNyD; trIdufrsm; pnf;urf; rJhpGefYypfjcif;aMumifh a&ajrmif; ydwfqdkYjcif;rsm;jzpfyGm;vsuf&Sdojzifh aps;a&mif;cGifhjyKawmhrnfr[kwf aMumif; od&onf/ ]]vrf;ab;aps;onfawGukd NrdKU wGif;rSmyJ ae&mwpfckck vkyfay; zdkY pDpOfxm;w,f/t"du vrf; oGm;vrf;vmawG tcuftcJjzpf wJhyvufazmif;ay:awGrSma&mif;cs aewmukd z,f&Sm;oGm;r,f}}[k &efukefNrdKUawmfpnfyifom,ma&; aumfrwD (aps;rsm;Xme) rS tBuD; wef;t&m&SdwpfOD;u qdkonf/ ,if;uJhokdY vrf;ab;aps;onf rsm;udk z,f&Sm;&ef pDpOfjcif;rSm aumif;rGefonfhaqmif&Gufcsuf arG;0rf;ausmif;qdkif&mpD;yGm;a&; vkyfief;rsm;twGuf tcuftcJ ESifhtusKd;oufa&mufrIwpfpHkwpf &mjzpfay:vmvdrfhrnf[k vrf; ab;aps;onfwpfOD;u qdkonf/ ]]&efukefwpfNrdKUvHk;rSm&SdwJhaps; onfawGudk tqifajyatmif ae&mcsxm;ay;zdkYu vG,fr,f rxifygbl;/vHk;0aps;a&mif;cGifhrjyK awmhbl;qdk&if pm;0wfaea&; tcuftcJu usdef;aoaygufBuHK rSmtrSefyJ}}[k &efukefNrdKU taemf &xmvrf;ray:wGif aps;a&mif;cs vsuf&Sdonfh vrf;ab;aps;onf wpfOD;u qdkonf/ ,cifu tqdkygvrf;ab;aps; onfrsm;udk r[mAE¨Kvyef;NcHywf 0ef;usifwGif naps;wef;tjzpf zGifhvSpfay;&efpDpOfcJhzl;aomfvnf; taumiftxnfazmfEdkifjcif;r&Sd cJhay/vuf&SdtcsdefwGif &efukefNrdKU wGifvrf;ab;ü aps;a&mif;vsuf&Sd onfhaps;onfaygif;ckepfaomif; wdkYtm;trSDtcdkjyKvsuf&Sdonfh rdom;pk0ifaygif; oHk;odef;ausmf cefY&Sdonf[k od&onf/ ]]EdkifiHwumrSmvnf; vrf;ab; aps;onfqdkwm&Sdygw,f/ tdrfeD; csif; xdkif;EdkifiHrSmvnf; vrf;ab; aps;ESifhnaps;awGaMumifh emrnf &w,f/urÇmvSnfhc&D;onfawG udk qGJaqmifEdkifw,f/ oefY&Sif; a&;? usef;rma&;wdkYudkvnf; *½k pdkufw,f/pnf;urf;rJhvnf;trIduf rypfMubl;}}[kNrdKUjypDrHudef; ynm&SifwpfOD;u qdkonf/ xdkYaMumifh 2014 ckESpf? puf wifbmvrSpwifum vrf;ab; yvufazmif;vloGm;vrf;rsm;wGif aps;a&mif;yguypönf;rsm;odrf; rnfhtjyifa&mif;csolukdvnf; t a&;,loGm;rnfjzpfonf/ vendors caught selling on the streets or pavements will face charges and see MinistryUnveilsFinalDraftofAdvertisementPolicies Aung Phyo M yanmar’s Infor- mation Ministry has unveiled the ment policies for socially responsible media, and is inviting advice and sug- gestions from the public, according to a statement from the ministry. The advertisement poli- cies comprise 14 sectors, including politics, reli- gion, culture, education, tobacco and alcohol, ille- gal gambling and lottery, children, private free- services, advertisement of products, property rights and environmental con- servation. The policies are aimed at promoting people’s trust in socially respon- sible media, reducing complaints against ad- vertisements in socially responsible media and disputes and encourag- ing a market- oriented economic system, said the statement. The statement called for respect for private free- dom and current laws. The rules for advertise- ment policies will take ef- fect from April 2015, the statement added. jrefrmEdkifiHjyefMum;a&;0efBuD; Xmeonf vlrIa&;t&wm0ef,l aomrD'D,mrsm;jzpfap&efaMumfjim rl0g'rsm;twGuf aemufqHk; rlMurf;udk xkwfjyefvdkufNyD; jynfol rsm;xHrStBuHjyKcsufrsm;zdwfac: xm;aMumif; 0efBuD;Xme xkwf jyefcsuft& od&onf/ aMumfjimrl0g'rsm;wGif u@ 14 ckyg0ifNyD; EdkifiHa&;? bmom a&;? ,Ofaus;rI? ynma&;? t&uf ESifhaq;&GufBuD;?w&m;r0ifavmif; upm;ESifh xD? tusKd;tjrwfr,l aom tzGJUtpnf;rsm;? uav; oli,frsm;? yk*¾vduvGwfvyfcGifh? aq;0g;rsm;? aiGaMu;0efaqmifrI rsm;? ukefypönf;aMumfjimjcif;rsm;? ydkifqdkifrIrlydkifcGifhrsm;ESifhobm0 ywf0ef;usifxdef;odrf;a&;wdkYjzpf onf/ xkwfjyefcsufwGifyk*¾vduvGwf vyfcGifhESifhwnfqJOya'rsm;udk av;pm;vdkufem&efwdkufwGef;xm; onf/aMumfjimrl0g'rsm;qdkif&m pnf;rsOf;rsm;rSm 2015 {NyDvwGif pwiftouf0ifrnfjzpfonf/ Bloomberg Rice dumplings (zongzi) are seen at a roadside stall in Chinatown of Yangon. UAung/Xinhua
  5. 5. July 24-30, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com LOCAL BIZ 5 Myanmar Summary Myanmar Summary Air Mandalay to Buy Up to Ten Mitsubishi Regional Jets May Soe San Aye Myat A ir Mandalay has signed an aircraft purchase agree- ment with Mitsubishi Air- craft for an order of six MRJ90s with a purchase option for an additional four, the local private car- rier said. Deliveries of the Mit- T wo private banks in Myanmar – Kan- bawza Bank and Cooperative Bank will raise their interest rates posits starting August 1. The current interest rate of 8 percent for saving deposits will increase to 8.25 percent, while that posit will rise from 8 per- cent to 9 percent. posits of three, six and nine months will also rise by 0.75 percent, 0.5 per- cent and 0.25 percent re- spectively. However, the interest months will remain un- changed at the previous rate of 10 percent. It is expected that all other private banks in the country will follow suit soon, state-run media an- nounced. subishi Regional Jet (MRJ), Japan’s next-gen- eration regional aircraft, are scheduled to start in 2018. In the meantime, the airline will be expanding Regional Jets (ERJ) from Brazil, it said in an an- nouncement at the start of the annual Farnborough International Air Show in Hampshire, England. Yangon-based Air Man- dalay, currently operates turboprop aircraft and is “seeking to expand and bility through the intro- duction of regional jets,” it said. “We are dedicated to fa- cilitating transportation in Myanmar and enhanc- ing the travel experience of our loyal customers,” said Air Mandalay CEO Gary J Villiard. “Our plan is to expand our route structure in order to service our ex- panding customer base as the country’s air travel requirements continue to show record growth.” This agreement comes as local carriers try to serve both the local popu- lation of – and visitors to – Myanmar, as the coun- try transitions to an in- ternational standard air transport structure. The addition of the MRJ drive the airline’s expect- ed growth in the region, Air Mandalay said. Villiard said the com- pany chose the MRJ for its advanced design char- acteristics, its promised customer support backed by the Mitsubishi parent company and the reliabil- ity and economy of the Pratt & Whitney Geared Turbofan Engine (GTF). By 2032, Mitsubishi Air- craft anticipates demand of about 1,000 airplanes in the expanding Asian regional jet market. The agreement is expected to enable Mitsubishi Air- craft to accelerate sales Thus far, 325 MRJ are on order but Air Manda- line outside of Japan to select the aircraft. Founded in 1994, the airline currently serves 15 domestic destinations. Air Mandalay taejzifh *syefav,mOfxkwfvkyfonfh ukrÜPDwpfckjzpfonfh rpfqlbD&SD ESifhav,mOf0,f,l&ef oabm wlnDrIwpfckudkjyKvkyfcJhNyD; MRJ90 trsKd;tpm;av,mOfajcmufpif; 0,f,l&ef oabmwlnDcJhNyD; aemufxyfav;pif;udkyg xyfrH 0,f,l&efvnf; tpDtpOf&Sdonf [k od&onf/ rpfqlbD&SDrS ,if; av,mOfrsm;tm; vmrnfh 2018 ckESpfwGif ay;ydkYoGm;rnf[kvnf; od&onf/xdkYjyif Air Mandalay csJUxGif&eftwGuf b&mZD;EdkifiHrS Embraer Regional jet trsKd; tpm;ajcmufpif;jzifhvnf; xyfrH wdk;csJUoGm;&ef&Sdonf[k t*FvefEdkifiH Hampshire NrdKUwGifjyKvkyfcJhaom Farnborough EdkifiHwumav aMumif;jyyGJrS xkwfjyefcsuft& od&onf/ vuf&SdtcsdefwGif Air Mandalay rsm;udk yefumESpfvHk;wyfav,mOf rsm;jzifh vkyfief;aqmif&Gufvsuf *sufav,mOfrsm;jzifh csJUxGifEdkif&ef pDpOfaejcif;jzpfonf/AirMandalay CEO Gary J Villiard u ]]uRefawmfwdkY&JUopöm&Sdazmufonf awGtwGuf c&D;oGm;vma&;ydkrdk tqifajyatmifvdkY &nf&G,fNyD;vkyf cJhwmyg/ avaMumif;vdkif;ESifh c&D; oGm;vmrIuvnf; ydkrdkjrifhrm;vm wmaMumifh 'Dav,mOfopfawG xyfrH0,fzdkY qHk;jzwfcJhwmyg}}[k ajymcJhonf/xdkYjyif rpfqlbD&SDav ,mOfopfrsm;onf AirMandalay avaMumif;vdkif;tusKd;aus;Zl; rsm;axmufyHhay;Ekdifvdrfhrnf[k vnf; Air Mandalay u aMunmcJhonf/ An Air Mandalay aircraft at Thandwe Airport in Rakhine state. SherpaHossainy Private Banks in Myanmar to Raise Interest Rate yk*¾vdubPfESpfckjzpfonfh CB bPfESifh uarÇmZbPfwdkY pkaqmif;onfhpkaqmif;aiGrsm; udk ay;tyfonfh twdk;rsm;rsm; Mo*kwfv 1 &ufaeYrS pwifí wdk;jr§ifhay;oGm;rnf[k od&onf/ vuf&SdbPfESpfckuay;tyfvsuf &Sdaomtwdk;EIef;rSm &Spf&mcdkifEIef; jzpfNyD; ,if;twdk;EIef;tm; 8 'or 25 &mcdkifEIef;odkY wdk;jr§ifhay;oGm; rnfjzpfNyD;pm&if;aotyfaiGwpfv twdk;EIef;[m &Spf&mcdkifEIef;rS udk;&mcdkifEIef;odkY wdk;jr§ifhoGm;rnf jzpfonf/ xdkYjyif pm&if;aotyfaiG oHk;v? ajcmufvESifhudk;vpkaqmif;jcif; rsm;twGuf okn 'or 75 &mcdkifEIef;? okn'or 5 &mcdkif EIef;ESifh okn'or 25 &mcdkifEIef; toD;oD;wdk;jr§ifhay;oGm;rnfjzpf aMumif; od&onf/ odkYaomf wpfESpftwGuf pm&if; aotyfaiGrsm;ay;tyfaom 10&mcdkifEIef;twdk;EIef;udkrlajymif;vJ rnfr[kwfaMumif; od&onf/
  6. 6. July 24-30, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com LOCAL BIZ 6 Myanmar Summary Government Inspects Manufacturing Businesses for Licences May Soe San A uthorities are in- specting manufac- turing businesses to uncover unregistered companies as a spread of unregistered small and medium businesses (SME) throughout Myanmar are thought to be undercutting local industrial production. The Ministry of Indus- try’s Industrial Supervi- sion unit’s director general U Thein Swe said private industrial businesses are wrong to think registering companies is a time con- suming process without “There are advantages to being registered such as being eligible for loans and able to employ for- eigners. We also share technologies with regis- tered businesses,” he said. SMEs are currently regulated by Myanmar’s 1990 private industrial law, while an SME Bill is being discussed at the parliament. U Thein Swe said the - nesses found to be oper- ating without a licence under these regulations. About 50 to 60 unregis- tered companies are now getting registered every month, he added. “The law invites busi- nesses to register. If they don’t register we cannot accurately calculate the GDP of the country,” he said. GDP (Gross Domes- tic Product) is the mar- and services produced in a country. The statistic plays a key role the gov- ernment’s monitoring of economic progress and the implementation of de- velopment reforms. But the government’s call for businesses to reg- ister isn’t solely based on their own administrative interests. U Thein Swe said un- registered SMEs face increased land owner- ship and fraud disputes, which disadvantage local commercial production throughout the domestic sector. “Registering businesses allows safeguard meas- ures to be put in place, protecting trade and manufacturing licences, and protects weaker in- dustrial sectors from ex- cess foreign investment entering the market,” said a director of Shwe Thun- dayi cosmetic company. By making businesses register, the government is attempting to unify indus- national productivity. The Ministry of Industry was restructured in December 2011 by integrating Minis- try of Industry no.1 and 2. The ministry is also en- gaging in founding new factories and training facilities to improve or enable the production of transport vehicles, con- struction and agricultural machineries, and rubber- based and high tech prod- jrefrmEdkifiHtao;pm;ESifh tvwfpm;yk*¾vdupufrIvkyfief; rsm;taejzifhrSwfyHkwifrjyKvkyfrI rsm; &SdaeqJjzpfaMumif; pufrI 0efBuD;Xmevufatmuf&Sd pufrI BuD;Muyfa&;ESifhppfaq;a&;OD;pD; XmerS od&onf/ ]]yk*¾vdupufrIvkyfief;awGtm; enf;csufu rSwfyHkwif&rSmudk tvkyf½Iyfw,f? tcsdefMuefYMum w,fqdkNyD;awmh tJ'Dvdkvdkifpif rvkyfMubl;/tJ'Dvdkrvkyfwm[m wdkif;jynf&JU GDP udk wGufvdkY r&bl;/todynmtm;enf;wm vnf;ygw,f/ tJ'gaMumifh tck &SmazGNyD;awmhrSwfyHkwifvkyfay;ae wm}}[k pufrI0efBuD;Xme Director of Industrial Supervision and Inspection 'kñTefMum;a&; rSL; OD;odef;aqGu ajymonf/ puf½Hkrsm;rSrSwfyHkwiftm;enf; qdkif&m0efxrf;rsm;rS uGif;qif; ppfaq;rIrsm;aqmif&GufNyD; &efukef wdkif;twGif; vkyfief;topfrSwfyHk wifjcif;udk wpfvvQif puf½Hk 50? 60 cefY rSwfykHwifay;ae& aMumif; od&onf/ ]]tckOya'uzdwfac:xm;w,f/ SME awGaiGacs;vdkY&w,f/EdkifiH jcm;om;cefYxm;vdkY&w,f/enf; ynmvnf;rQa0ay;cGifh&SdwJhtwGuf rSwfyHkwifolawG&Sdvmw,f/rwif &ifawmh 'Pf½dkufwm&Sdw,f/ 1990 Oya'eJY w&m;pGJw,f}}[k 'kñTefMum;a&;rSL; OD;odef;aqGu ajymonf/ tao;pm;ESifhtvwfpm;pufrI Zkefrsm;rSwfyHkrwifjcif;aMumifh ajr,miSm;&rf;rIjyóemrsm;? rdom;pkydkifqdkifrIjyóemrsm;? trnfvdrfvnfrIjyóemrsm;jzpf ay:yguajz&Sif;&eftcuftcJrsm; taejzifh uGif;qif;ppfaq;&mwGif ajr,mtrnfayguf taqmuf ttHkrsm;?pufypönf;rsm;udk t"du xm;ppfaq;aeaMumif; od&onf/ pufrI0efBuD;Xmetaejzifh vlpD; eif;ukefwif,mOfarmfawmf,mOf trsKd;rsKd;?aqmufvkyfa&;vkyfief; oHk;,mOf,EÅ&m;trsKd;rsKd;? 'DZ,f tif*sifrsm;?armfawmf,mOftpdwf tydkif;rsm;? wmbdkifrsm;? vQyfppf "mwfay;pufrsm;? a&wGif;wl;puf rsm;? tqifhjrifhpufud&d,mrsm;? Transformer rsm;? aea&mifjcnf pGrf;tifoHk;vQyfppfypönf;rsm;? v,f,moHk;pufypönf;trsKd;rsKd;? a&mfbmqufpyfypönf; rsm;xkwf vkyfjcif;? acwfrDenf; ynmjrifh rm;aomxkwfukefrsm;xkwfvkyfEdkif &eftwGufpuf½Hktopfrsm; wnfaxmifjcif;? pufrIuRrf;usif vkyfom;rsm;ay:xGufvma&;t wGufavhusifhoifMum;ay;rnfhpuf rIoifwef;ausmif;rsm;wnf axmifjcif;wdkYudk t"du aqmif &Gufvsuf&Sdonf/ 2011 ckESpf 'DZifbm 2 &ufrS pí trSwf 1 ESifh trSwf 2 puf rI0efBuD;XmewdkYudkpufrI0efBuD;Xm etjzpfjyefvnfjyifqifzGJUpnf;cJh NyD;vuf&SdtcsdefwGif1990Edk0if bm26wGifxkwfjyefonfhyk*¾vd upufrIvkyfief;Oya'om&Sdonfh SMEqdkif&mOya'rSmvTwfawmf twGif;aqG;aEG;aeqJjzpfaMumif; od&onf/ A woman works at a manufacturing factory in an industrial zone in Yangon. OliverSlow/MBT
  7. 7. July 24-30, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com 7 Myanmar Summary Myanmar Summary LOCAL BIZ MyanmaRailwaystoInvite TendertoBuildDryPorts May Soe San S tate-run Myanma Railways will invite local and interna- tional businesses in Au- gust for an open tender to construct dry ports for the development of the local logistics sector. The project is expected - which will ensure access to dry ports and contain- erisation for rail trans- port, boosting connectiv- ity for industries engaged in import-export. “We plan to invite ten- ders from local and in- ternational business in August with construction set to start in September,” told U Aung Myo Myint, deputy general manager of cargo for Myanma Rail- ways. Construction for dry ports are expected to be completed by May 2015, which will be followed by a planned upgrade to the railroad infrastructure in June of next year that will help accommodate container trains that run from inland depots to sea- ports, as well as other in- dustrial zones. The short-term schemes aim to develop dry ports in Yangon and Mandalay, Myanmar’s major com- mercial cities. The project is drafted to include six sites that in- clude Kwae Ma, Ywarth- argyi, Tanyingone, Myo- haung, Myitnge, Palate stations. The potential project sites will be as- sessed before implemen- tation with only two sites Ywarthargyi in Yangon and Myitnge in Mandalay. LabourRequirementsGrowingThroughoutMyanmar Phyo Thu E xperts have re- leased a report - mar is facing a shortage of trained and capable labour in a range of in- dustrial sectors that could threaten the nation’s de- velopment prospects. The country’s demand for skilled workers is ex- pected to reach a level equal to almost half the population by 2015. Myanmar Arts and Sci- ence Academics Asso- ciation Vice President Dr Thet Lwin and Yangon University of Economics Vice Rector Dr Tun Aung prepared the report fore- casting Myanmar’s future employment needs. The document estimat- ed Myanmar will need 32 million more workers in job areas including agri- culture, forestry, energy, mining, industry, electri- cal, construction, social, management and trading by next year. Yangon University of Economics Rector Dr Tin Win said the report used mathematical calcula- tions to determine where the skilled worker short- ages were most prominent throughout Myanmar. If Myanmar is unable to increase education and training to help citizens improve their employ- ability then the country’s labour needs could reach over 34.6 million by 2020, while demand for skilled workers stood at 29.7 mil- lion people in 2010, ac- cording to the report. The report said the country’s agriculture sec- tor will have the highest labour requirement while the industrial and trad- ing sectors will also have employment demands of over 3 million labourers. Dr Thet Lwin and Dr Tun Aung, the report’s authors, said the agricul- ture, industrial engineer- ing and information and media industries should be prioritised for local employment expansion. Last month the IMF forecast it expects Myan- mar’s economic growth to rise to a rate of 8.5 per- jrefrmhpD;yGm;a&; vmrnfh 2015 ckESpftwGif; pdkufysKd;a&;? arG;jrLa&;? opfawm? pGrf;tif? owåKwGif;? pufrI? vQyfppfvkyfief;? aqmufvkyfa&;? vlrIa&;? pDrH tkyfcsKyfa&;ESifh ukefoG,frI? tjcm; aomvkyfief;u@rsm;tvdkuf vkyfom;vdktyfcsufrSmEdkifiHhvlOD; a&xuf0ufcefYjzpfonfh vkyf om; 32 'or 06 oef;cefY vdktyfrnfjzpfaMumif; pD;yGm;a&; qdkif&mtqifhjr§ihfynmu@pmwrf; wpfapmifwGif yg&Sdxm;onf/ tqdkygu@tvdkuf vkyfom; vdktyfcsufazmfjyrIwGif pdkufysKd; a&;ydkif;wGif tjrifhqHk;tjzpfvkyf om;vdktyfvmrnfjzpfaMumif;yg &dSNyD; pufrIu@ESifhukefoG,frI u@wdkYwGif vdktyfcsufwwd, tjrifhqHk;tjzpf oHk;oef;ausmf vdktyfrnfjzpfonf/ ,if;oHk;oyfcsufpmwrf;udk jrefrmEdkifiH0dZÆmESifhodyÜHynm&Sif rsm;tzGJU? 'kwd,Ouú| a'gufwm oufvGifESihf &efukefpD;yGm;a&; wuúodkvf 'kwd,ygarmu©csKyf a'gufwmxGef;atmifwdkYucefYrSef; jyKpkxm;Mujcif;jzpfonf/ jynfwGif;ukefpnfydkYaqmifa&; u@zGHUNzdK;wdk;wufa&;twGuf wnfaqmufoGm;rnfh ukef;wGif; qdyfBuD;rsm;udk pwiftaumif txnfazmf&ef Mo*kwfvtwGif; üjynfwGif;?jynfyvkyfief;&Sifrsm;udk wif'gac:,lrnfjzpfaMumif; jrefrmhrD;&xm;rS od&onf/ jrefrmEdkifiHtaejzifh ukefpnf ydkYaqmifa&;u@rSm ukef;wGif; qdyfrsm; ydkrdkzGHUNzdK;wdk;wufvmap &efESifh ukefaowåmrsm; o,f,l &mwGif &xm;jzifh o,f,ljcif; pDrHudef;udk 2014-2015 ckESpf twGif; NyD;pD;atmifaqmif&Guf oGm;rnfjzpfonf/ 2015 arvrSm vkyfief;rsm; tm;vHk;udk NyD;pD;atmifaqmif&Guf oGm;rnfjzpfNyD; ZGefvtwGif;ü ,if;ukef;wGif;qdyfrsm;rSwpfqifh jynfwGif; & xm; vrf; rsm; udkt qifhjr§ifhwifNyD;EdkifiHtwGif;& xm; eJYukefaowåmrsm;udkydkYaqmifo,f ,lay;Ekdif&ef&nf&G,fonf/ cent by March 2015. The report suggests increased shortages in skilled la- bour could stall the coun- try’s economic progress. Myanmar is facing skills shortages in many sectors central to the country’s infrastructure develop- ment. The civil adminis- tration and service sectors are expected to require 2 million further skilled workers by next year. Estimates also forecast employment demands for the tourism industry to reach 930,000 workers in 2015. Myanmar’s tourism industry is expected to contribute over $1 billion in 2014, increased from $926 million in 2013 and $534 million in 2012. However, a lack of trained and capable la- bour could undercut fur- ther revenue increases in the tourism industry. The experts said skill shortages in Myanmar’s foreign language and medical and healthcare services were also likely to become prominent. A worker stands on a bridge in Yangon. UAung/Xinhua
  8. 8. July 24-30, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com LOCAL BIZ 8 Myanmar Summary Banking Conference Focuses on Local Banks’ HR, Capacity Dearth Aundrea Montaño T he 2nd annual My- anmar Banking and Business Develop- ment Conference, hosted by Sphere Conferences and Republic of the Union of Myanmar Federation of Chambers of Commerce and Industry, was held on July 15 – 17 in Yangon at the Sule Shangri-La Ho- tel. Day one of the confer- ence focused on the stra- tegic aspects and the fu- ture of the banking and - mar as it moves towards increased global integra- tion, while day two em- phasised the use of tech- nology. Dr Aung Thura, CEO of Thura Swiss, moderated a panel discussing the im- pact of impending foreign bank licences. During the panel discussion, Dr Sein Maung, chairman of First Private Bank, shared his surprise that the govern- ment was so quickly will- ing to allow foreign banks to operate in Myanmar saying that while the gov- ernment has good inten- tions, the decision is a bit “premature.” “Why rush? The legal base is not ready yet. Ad- ditionally, there is a big gap between capitalisa- tion, skills and technol- ogy. “We are in the process of building a house, in the process of building insti- tutions. We should not rush this process. “My advice to move step-by-step in a prag- matic fashion,” ” Dr Sein Maung told the panel. Kittiya Todhanakasem, a senior executive vice president and managing director at Krung Thai Bank, acknowledged Dr Sein Maung’s concerns and added that in an over- seas market the market leader must be domestic. She further emphasised that Thai banks will focus - ing trade of Thai corpo- rations, which is a likely scenario for any foreign bank granted one of the coveted foreign banking licences. Kim Chawsu Gyi, depu- ty managing director and head of transformation at KBZ Bank, added that foreign banks are vital to - ture projects, which local banks cannot currently accommodate with their limited capitalisation. Also discussed at the conference is the reality of the immense challeng- system faces in terms of the lack of skilled work- ers and technological im- provements. Kim Chawsu Gyi, who is responsible for the de- velopment of human re- source capacity for Myan- mar’s largest bank KBZ, said, “We must recruit individuals with the right skills and talent, but it is equally important for these individuals to learn soft skills such as team- work, how to provide ex- cellent customer service, and how to work in a pro- - ment.” Dr Sein Maung acknowl- edged the critical need to upgrade the technology of Myanmar’s banks. How- ever, upgrading technol- ogy is not as easy of a task as many might think. “Upgrading technol- ogy is very expensive. On top of that, lots of ven- dors come to sell software without the proper sales support and local support said. for intensive and quick action in addressing hu- - cies, suggesting advance- ments in basic education, courses should be empha- sised. U Set Aung, deputy gov- ernor of the Central Bank, spoke about the country’s commercial and business climate and touted Myan- mar’s potential for busi- ness development and trade saying, “The Minis- try of Commerce has fo- cused on four main areas that include trade promo- tion, facilitation, liberali- sation, and education. “As a result, Myanmar’s increased during the last three years.” According to data pre- sented at the conference, Myanmar’s trade volume has increased from $15.27 - cal year, to an expected $24.87 million in the U Set Aung said Myan- mar’s current prospects for growth lie in the coun- try’s many “untapped natural and human re- sources, its strategic loca- tion and ability to become a major regional trad- ing hub, and increasing south-south and global trading opportunities.” Attendees at a session of the Myanmar Bankign and Business Develelopment Conference. Microeconomic Objectives Surpass Target; May Soe San M yanmar re- corded a trade trillion ($2.08 billion) in the second half of 2013- Thein, deputy minister for national planning and economic development, told a recent parliament session. Exports earned K5.93 trillion ($5.93 billion) and import volume reached K8.01 trillion ($8.01 bil- lion) during this period, she said while presenting a report on National Eco- nomic Plan, released by the Ministry of National Planning and Economic Development. The report outlined the government’s progress in the second half of the 2013-14FY. - economic objectives sur- passed the target and reached 125 percent of the planned goals, an improvement in perfor- mance of 7.5 percent com- pared to the same period last year, the report said. According to the report, agriculture accounted for 31.9 percent of the total economy, compared with the previous estimation of 29.9 percent. The in- dustrial sector accounted for 32.7 percent, which is lower than the sector’s estimation of 33.8 per- cent. The service sector accounted for 35.4 per- cent which was also lower that its estimated 36.3 percent. The period coincided with the harvest season, which produced over K9.17 trillion ($9.17 bil- lion) in the agriculture sector. A total of 35 local enter- prises were approved un- der the Myanmar Nation- al Investment Law, which amounted to an invest- ment volume of almost K1 trillion ($1 billion), while 68 foreign companies were approved under the 2012 Foreign Investment Law accounting for K2.37 trillion ($2.37 billion) in investment, according to the report. sector during the second year saw the expanding of bank branches, which increased by 210 to 695, while 470 private money exchange counters have been approved during the period. The report said 82.5 per- cent of the planned objec- tives have been complet- ed in the energy sector, while 99.5 percent were completed in the mining and mineral sector and 95 percent in electric sector during the period. The government has increased electricity sup- ply in many states and regions thus reducing the private usage of diesel to run generators for house- hold or commercial pur- poses. Myanmar Summary 2013-2014 b@ma&;ESpf 'kwd,ajcmufvywftwGif;jynfy ukefoG,fa&;tajctaerSm ukef oG,frIvdkaiG usyf 2076 'or 3 bDvD,Hjzpfay:cJhaMumif; trsKd; om;pDrHudef;aqmif&GufrItpD&ifcH pmESifhpyfvsOf;í &Sif;vif;wifjy csufwGif trsKd;om;pDrHudef;ESifh pD;yGm;a&;zGHUNzdK;wdk;wufrIXme 'kwd,0efBuD;a':vJhvJhodef;u ajymMum;cJhjcif;jzpfonf/ jynfyukefoG,frItajctaerSm 'kwd,ajcmufvywftwGif; ydkYukef usyf 5933 bDvD,HESifh oGif;ukef usyf 8009 'or 3 bDvD,Hjzpf ojzifh ukefoG,frIyrmP usyf 13942 'or 3 bDvD,H&SdcJhNyD; ukefoG,frIvdkaiG usyf 2076 'or 3bDvD,Hjzpfay:cJhjcif;jzpfonf/ jrefrmEdkifiHbPfESifh pD;yGm;a&; zGHUNzdK;wdk;wufa&;nDvmcHudk NyD;cJhonfhoDwif;ywftwGif;&efukef ü usif;ycJh&m EdkifiHaygif; 16 EkdifiHrS udk,fpm;vS,f 250 OD; onf jrefrmEdkifiHbPfvkyfief; u@tcGifhta&;rsm;taMumif; avhvm&efESifh rdwfzGJUcsdwfquf &ef wufa&mufcJhMuonf/ nDvmcHyxraeYwGif EdkifiH wumESifhaygif;pnf;&ef OD;wnf vsuf&Sdonfh bPfvkyfief;ESifh aiGaMu;u@tem*wfESifh r[mAsL[mqdkif&mtydkif;rsm; tay: tm½HkpdkufaqG;aEG;cJhMuNyD; 'kwd,aeYwGif enf;ynmoHk;pGJ rItay: tav;xm;aqG;aEG;cJh Muonf/ rMumrDcsay;awmhrnfh jynfy bPfrsm; vkyfudkifcGifhvkdifpif oufa&mufEdkifajctay:pum; 0dkif;aqG;aEG;yGJwGif Thura Swiss ukrÜPDrS pDtD;tdka'gufwm atmifol&un§dEIdif;a&;rSL;tjzpf aqmif&Gufay;cJhonf/xdkaqG;aEG; yGJwGif yxryk*¾vdubPfOuú| a'gufwmpdefarmifu jrefrmEdkifiH wGif EdkifiHjcm;bPfrsm; 0ifa&muf &ef vsifjrefpGmcGifhjyKay;vdkaom tpdk;&oabmxm;tay: tHhtm;oifhrdaMumif; zGifhxkwfajym qdkonf/tpdk;&taejzifh &nf&G,f csufaumif;rsm;jzifh qHk;jzwfjcif; jzpfaomfvnf; ,if;qHk;jzwfcsuf rSm ]]r&ifhusufaom}} qHk;jzwfcsuf jzpfaMumif; ajymMum;onf/
  9. 9. July 24-30, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com LOCAL BIZ 9 Myanmar Summary Scotch Whisky Gets Special Legal Protection in Myanmar Phyo Thu S cotch Whisky has been granted better protection by My- anmar authorities as a collective trademark in a move that is expected to help protect Scotland’s national drink against fakes in the growing Southeast Asian market. Scotch Whisky exports to Myanmar jumped 65 percent to £2 million last year from £888,734 in 2012, according to the Scotch Whisky Associa- tion. The move will provide added protection to both consumers and the indus- try, the association said. Alan Park, Scotch Whis- ky Association legal ad- viser, said: “This will al- low us to protect Scotch Whisky against products illegally being sold or “Products suspected of misleading consum- ers and damaging the le- gitimate trade are already under investigation and may become the subject of legal action using the protection now given to Scotch Whisky in Burma.” The changes mirror those introduced in Aus- tralia earlier this year, a country which was said to have a “serious problem” with fakes. The trademark gives similar protection to Scotch in Burma already enjoyed by products such as Parma ham and Cham- pagne which are subject to a geographic indicator (GI) a range of geographically unique products. British Ambassador to Myanmar Andrew Pat- rick said: “Scotch Whisky is recognised worldwide as a distinctive and high quality British product and I am delighted that the Burmese authorities have taken steps to recog- nise and protect this. “A robust legal frame- work is of great impor- tance to foreign investors in any market and the British Embassy is sup- portive of the Burmese develop this.” In 2012, Chelsea FC agreed a two-year spon- sorship deal with local whisky Grand Royal – Myanmar’s best-selling brand – which boasts an unnamed Scottish master blender on its label, but, in accordance with Scotch whisky rules, does not claim to be Scotch. Earlier this month, a German scientist living in Scotland announced a new technique to tackle counterfeit Scotch whisky by determining whether the water used to make it comes from Scotland. - cation Scheme, launched earlier this year, ensures that every part of the Scotch whisky supply chain is mapped by the industry, registered with the UK government and inspected to ensure it complies fully with all the rules on the production of Scotch. DavidGray/Reuters the production of Scotch whisky must register with Her Majesty’s Revenue & Customs by listing their sites within and out- side Scotland, including distilleries, maturation facilities, blending and bottling plants. Foreign bottlers will also be sub- ject to controls. In addition, the spirit is already protected through the European Union GI scheme, meaning it can only be produced in Scot- land according to UK rules. Scotch Whisky vkyfief;tkyfpk tm; w&m;0ifrlydkiftrSwfwHqyf tjzpf cGifhjyKvkdufjcif;jzifh jrefrm tmPmydkifrsm;u tumtuG,f wdk;jr§ifhay;vdkufNyD;aps;uGuftwGif; twkjyKvkyfcH&rIrS umuG,fay; Edkifrnf[k ,lqxm;Muonf/ Scotch Whisky rS jrefrmEdkifiH odkY wifydkYrIrSm 2012 ckESpfwGif aygif 888ç734 wefzdk;&Sd&mrS NyD;cJh onfhESpfwGif aygifESpfoef;odkY wdk;wufvmcJhonf/ txufyg aqmif&Gufcsufu pm;oHk;olrsm; ESifh vkyfief;u@ESpfrsKd;vHk;tm; tumtuG,fay;rnfjzpfonf/ jrefrmEdkifiHwGif ScotchWhisky twGuf tumtuG,fowfrSwf ay;jcif;aMumifh pm;oHk;olrsm;tm; vdrfvnfonfh odkYr[kwf w&m; 0ifta&mif;t0,ftm; xdcdkuf aponfh ukefypönf;rsm;udk pHkprf; ppfaq;vsuf&SdNyD; w&m;Oya' t&ta&;,loGm;rnfjzpfaMumif; Scotch Whisky tkyfpkOya' tBuHay; Alan Park u qdk onf/ rnfonfhaps;uGufwGifrqdk EdkifiH jcm;&if;ESD;jr§KyfESHolrsm;twGuf awmifhwif;aom Oya'tajccH rlabmif&Sd&efrSmta&;BuD;aMumif; ESifh NAdwdefoH½Hk;u jrefrmtpdk;& aqmif&Gufcsufrsm;udkyHhydk;ay;rnf jzpfaMumif; NAdwdefoHtrwf Andrew Patrick u qdkonf/ ,ckvtapmydkif;wGif paumh wvef&Sd *smrefynm&SifwpfOD;u oHk;pGJxm;onfha&rSmpaumhwvef 0DpuDtwkrsm;udkazmfxkwfEdkifrnfh enf;ynmopfawGU&SdcJhonf/
  10. 10. July 24-30, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com LOCAL BIZ 10 Myanmar Summary Myanmar Summary Myanmar’s Legal Framework and Immigration Stefanie Siegfried I n this week’s case study, our client, XYZ B.V., asked us if it is possible to send an executive employee to Yangon to conduct mar- ket research before their new company has been approved and registered for operation. In our case study last week, we al- ready advised them to set up a MIC company. MIC approval will take approximately 3 months; however, the company wants to start research ac- tivities right away. In this particular case we do not or an executive research- er to Yangon on a tourist visit visa. A tourist visa is only val- id for a single entry, which is granted for a period of 28 days, and does not al- low the holder to engage in any sort of commer- cial activities in Myan- mar. Because leasing an apartment is prohibited to individuals holding a XYZ B.V. is only allowed to stay at a hotel that has been pre-approved by the Ministry of Tourism. conduct market research should enter Myanmar with a valid business visa, issued upon arrival at ei- ther Yangon or Mandalay International Airports or by a Myanmar consulate Strohal Legal Group presents a weekly case study aiming to provide an overview and updates on the legal framework in Myanmar abroad. To obtain a busi- - ber needs an invitation letter from a Myanmar company as well as a copy But, is it possible to ob- - ments? Yes. XYZ B.V. wants to - search especially given their competitors are also attempting to enter the market. Therefore, it is vital to send an executive employee immediately to Myanmar with a valid business visa. In this case, one of our clients, a 100 percent Myanmar com- pany, is ready to assist by issuing the required documents for a small fee. However, it is important for the business activ- ground. Our Myanmar client company is also XYZ B.V.’s market re- salaries after reimburse- ment. Personnel leasing and recruitment services are legal in Myanmar and also provide full payroll services and employ- ment-related tax advice. Given this situation, we advised XYZ B.V. to send to the local company so documents that enable its employees to obtain their business visa, make ar- rangements for employ- ment, payment of salaries and other legal require- ments. During this pro- remain under the control and supervision of XYZ B.V. Later, after MIC has granted XYZ B.V. its com- pany registration, it can apply for a work permit at the Directorate of Labour under the Ministry of La- bour, and a stay permit and visa to the Immigra- tion and National Regis- tration Department from the Ministry of Immi- gration and Population. Once these permits are approved, XYZ B.V. can issue invitation letters and other required docu- ments needed for their visa. In the next case study we will advise the XYZ B.V. about renting real estate. Strohal Legal Group (SLG), founded by Dr Theodor Strohal in 1979, highly personalized ser- vices specializing in in- ternational and cross border business. SLG enjoys a well-established reputation across Eu- rope, Southeast Asia and the Middle East. In Myanmar, SLG provides services under the name U Min Sein & Strohal As- sociates Law Firm. The views and opinions expressed here are the author’s own and don’t - anmar Business Today’s editorial opinion. XYZ B.V. ukrÜPDtwGuf cGifhjyKcsufESifh rSwfyHk wifrusao;rD trIaqmift&m&Sd wpfa,muftm; &efukefodkY vTwf í aps;uGufokawoevkyf&ef jzpf Edkifovm;[k uRefrwdkYtm; ar; vmonf/xdkodkYaqmif&GufEdkifaomf vnf; c&D;oGm;{nfhonfADZmjzifh rvm&efuRefrwdkYu tBuHjyKvkduf onf/c&D;oGm;ADZmrSm wpfBudrf om 0ifcGifh&SdNyD; 28 &ufom&um udkifaqmifolrSm jrefrmEdkifiHtwGif; wGif pD;yGm;a&;vIyf&Sm;rIrsm; jyKvkyf ydkifcGifhr&SdaomaMumifhjzpfonf/ xdkYaMumifh aps;uGufokawoe jyKvkyfrnfholtaejzifh pD;yGm;a&; ADZmjzifh0ifvm&rnfjzpfNyD; &efukef avqdyfodkYr[kwfrEÅav;avqdyf odkY a&muf&Sdcsdef odkYr[kwf jynfy&Sd jrefrmaumifppf0ef½Hk;wGif pD;yGm; a&;ADZm&,lEdkifonf/pD;yGm;a&; ADZmtwGuf jrefrmukrÜPDwpfckrS zdwfac:pmESifh xdkukrÜPD w&m; 0ifrSwfyHkwifoufaocHpm&Guf rdwåLvdktyf&m xdkpm&Gufpmwrf; rsm;udk uRefrwdkY jznfhqnf;ay;Edkif ygonf/uRefrwdkYESifhcsdwfqufxm; aom jrefrmukrÜPDwpfcku tc aMu;aiGtenf;i,fjzifh xdkpm&Guf pmwrf;rsm; pDpOfay;EdkifNyD; XYZ B.V. rSaps;uGufokawoe0efxrf; rsm;tm; tvkyfcefYtyfí tpm; jyefay;rnfqdkygu vpmay;&ef vnf; pDpOfay;Edkifygonf/ odkY&m wGif XYZ B.V. 0efxrf;rsm; vIyf&Sm;rIrSm Oya'ESifhtnDjzpf&ef ta&;BuD;ygonf/ þyHkpHtm;jzifh XYZ B.V. xH rS vma&mufrnfh 0efxrf;rsm; tcsuftvufrsm;udk ydkYay;jcif;jzifh pm&Gufpmwrf;rsm;xkwfay;jcif;? tvkyfcefUtyfjcif;ESifh vpmay; jcif;rsm;udkaqmif&GufEdkifrnfjzpf onf/xdkYaemuf XYZ B.V. tae jzifh MIC cGifhjyKcsuf&vQif tvkyf orm;ñTefMum;rIOD;pD;XmewGif vkyfief;ygrpfavQmufxm;ívl0efrI BuD;Muyfa&;ESifhtrsKd;om;rSwfyHkwif OD;pD;XmewGifaexdkifcGifhygrpfavQmuf xm;Edkifrnfjzpfonf/ KBZ Bank to Launch Online Banking Services Aung Phyo M yanmar’s larg- est private bank, Kanbawza Bank, will launch online and mobile banking services soon, the bank said. US-based information security company, RSA, will provide protection to its customers from online fraud and cyber threats, it said. RSA is the security division of EMC, which is an American multination- al corporation. The bank started with an initial capital of K477 mil- lion ( about $500,000) in 1999 and has expanded its capital to K113 billion ($117 million) in 2014, according to the bank’s Early this year, another private bank, the Coop- eratives Bank (CB), has introduced mobile bank- ing system services in the country on a trial basis. There are more than 20 private banks and three state-owned banks in My- anmar. The Central Bank of Myanmar recently an- nounced that it would grant foreign banks to op- erate banking business in the country by September - eign banks will be given permission. jrefrmEdkifiHtBuD;qHk;yk*¾vdu bPfjzpfonfhuarÇmZbPfonf rMumrDtcsdeftwGif; Mobile Banking 0efaqmifrIpepfudk pwiftaumiftxnfazmfaqmif &GufoGm;rnf[k od&onf/ tar&dueftajcpdkufowif; tcsuftvufvHkNcHKa&;ukrÜPD jzpfonfh RSA u Mobile Banking pepftoHk;jyKolrsm; tay:qdkufbmNcdrf;ajcmufrIrsm; jyKvkyfjcif;?tGefvdkif;rSaiGvdrfvnf xkwf,lrIrsm;udk wm0ef,l&ef twGuf ulnDaxmufyHhay;oGm; rnf[k od&onf/ uarÇmZbPfonf 1999 ckESpf wGif jrefrmusyfaiG 477 oef; (tar&duefa':vm 5 odef;) jzifh bPfvkyfief;rsm; pwifcJhNyD; ,ckvuf&SdtcsdefwGif usyfaiG 133 bDvD,H (tar&duefa':vm 117 oef;) jzifh vkyfief;rsm; vnf ywfvsuf&SdaMumif; bPfvkyfief; qdkif&m aMunmcsufrsm;t& od& onf/ ,ckESpftapmydkif;wGif yk*¾vdubPfwpfckjzpfonfh CB Bank Mobile Banking pepfudk pwif taumiftxnfazmfcJhaMumif; od&onf/ A KBZ Bank branch in Yangon. SherpaHossainy
  11. 11. July 24-30, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com LOCAL BIZ 11 Rubber Farmers Seek Gov’t Htun Htun Minn M yanmar’s rubber farmers have re- quested support from the government af- ter compounding falls in the price of rubber have seen many struggling to support themselves. The sharp drop of rub- ber prices, a cash crop grown in almost all of Myanmar’s regions and - cal year, drove almost a million farmers and workers at rubber planta- - ship, Daw Mi Myint Than, a member of the parlia- ment, said. She said neighbour- ing countries had often helped struggling rubber growers in similar condi- tions, requesting the gov- ernment to provide direct support to farmers and guarantee a minimum price for the rubber they produce. However, deputy min- ister for agriculture and irrigation, U Ohn Than, said the government was unable to provide loans or set minimum prices for rubber due to scarcity of funds. The price of rubber changes daily, depending on demand from the glob- al market and large users of raw rubber. Thailand’s rubber exports, however, receive a larger price per tonne, $2,000, whereas Myanmar’s rubber ex- ports only receive $1,500 per tonne, due to lower quality. U Ohn Than said My- anmar’s rubber exports should therefore improve their production quality if they hope to improve the price they receive. Factors including slow- ing global economic of Europe’s debt crisis of global oil prices – often as a result of internal con- responsible for drops in rubber prices. Declines in vehicle pro- duction in China, one of the world’s largest rubber consuming countries, and large expansions in their rubber production and reserves has seen a fall in rubber imports. Myanmar has also seen a total expansion of 1.5 million acres in rubber plantations in almost eve- ry state and region except Kayah, Chin and Magwe, with production increas- ing 177,125 tonnes in state produced 10,000 tonnes of rubber in 2013- 14FY in 48,000 acres. Myanmar Summary a&mfbmaps;usqif;rIaMumifh jrefrmEdkifiH&Sd &mbmNcHvkyfief; rsm;wGifvkyfudkifaeol wpfoef; cefYonf tcuftcJBuHKawGUae& jcif;aMumifh tpdk;&rS tultnD ay;&ef,ckusif;yaeaomatmuf vTwfawmf (jynfolUvTwfawmf) tpnf;ta0;wGif awmif;qdkcJh onf/ jrefrmEdkifiHwGifa&mfbmpdkufysKd; jcif;udk rGefjynfe,f? u&ifjynf e,f? &Srf;jynfe,f? csif;jynfe,f? ucsifjynfe,f? yJcl;wdkif;a'oBuD;? {&m0wDwdkif;a'oBuD;? &efukef wdkif;a'oBuD;? weoFm&Dwdkif; a'oBuD;ESifh tjcm;a'orsm;wGif vnf;rsm;pGmaqmif&Gufaeonf/ ,if;a&mfbmvkyfief;rsm;wGif vkyfudkifaeol wpfoef;cefYrSm 2013-14 wGif a&mfbmaps;EIef; rsm; tqrwefusqif;rIaMumifh tcuftcJrsm;&ifqdkifae&onf/ ulnDajz&Sif;ay;&ef vTwfawmfrS wpfqifhawmif;qdkcJhjcif;jzpfonf/ tdrf;eD;csif;EdkifiHrsm;wGif ,if; udpöudk tpdk;&rS wm0ef,lajz&Sif; onfudk awGU&Sd&ojzifh xdkodkY aw mif;qdk&jcif;jzpfaMumif;a&mfbm vkyf om;rsm;udk,fpm;awmif;qdkcJhol vT wf awmf udk , f p m ; v S , f a':rdjrifhoef;u ajymonf/ awmif;qdk&mwGif a&mfbmpdkufysKd; olrsm;udk EdkifiHawmfrS taxmuf tyHhrsm;ay;&efESifh a&mfbmaps; EIef;wnfNidrfatmif tpdk;&rStedrfh qHk;aps;owfrSwfay;&efjzpfonf/ a&mfbmaygufaps;EIef;onf a&mfbmukefMurf;t"duoHk;pGJ aomEdkifiHrsm; 0,fvdktm;ESifh urÇma&mfbmaps;uGuftay: rlwnfaMumifh aeYpOfajymif;vJ Edkifonf/ a&mfbmudk u,m;jynfe,f? csif;jynfe,fESifhrauG;wdkif;a'o BuD;wdkYrSty usefwdkif;a'oBuD; ESifh jynfe,frsm;wGif 2013-14 ckESpfwGifa&mfbmpdkuf{u 1 'or 5 oef;cefYwdk;wufpdkufysKd;cJhonf/ Bloomberg
  12. 12. July 24-30, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com LOCAL BIZ 12 Myanmar Summary Myanmar Summary UNtoHelpMyanmarPrepareforAWarmingClimate AdamDean/Reuters Megan Rowling U N agencies have signed an agree- ment with Myan- mar’s government to help the Southeast Asian na- tion prepare for climate change impacts, including droughts, cyclones and The United Nations En- vironment Programme (UNEP) and the United Nations Human Settle- ments Programme (UN- Habitat) will support Myanmar to integrate climate change considera- tions into policies, and to develop a national strate- gy to prepare for a warm- ing climate. “The impacts of climate change are here and now in the present, and are likely to become more se- vere in the future,” said Yoshinobu Fukasawa, UN-Habitat’s regional di- “These impacts threaten both the progress towards the Millennium Develop- ment Goals Myanmar has made in the last few years and also the rapid eco- nomic growth the country is currently experienc- ing.” In May 2008, for exam- ple, Cyclone Nargis swept across Myanmar, trigger- ing a huge sea surge and killing nearly 140,000 people. It destroyed vil- - million people in Yangon and the Irrawaddy Delta. Scientists expect more in- tense storms like this, as the planet warms. The four-year pro- gramme will be led by the Ministry of Environmen- tal Conservation and For- estry and implemented by the two UN agencies. The European Union has pro- vided €4 million ($5.45 million) in funding as part of a wider global ini- tiative. “The momentum of re- form and the possibility for rapid growth means that there is a unique opportunity here to en- courage a low-carbon development model and ensure climate change adaptation is well-main- streamed,” the delegation of the European Union to Myanmar said in a joint statement on the inking of the agreement in the capital Nay Pyi Taw. “It is crucial that this growth and development the country is striving for is not undermined and compromised.” The programme aims to raise awareness among government, civil soci- ety, researchers and the private sector about the need to address climate change, to coordinate grassroots planning for climate change, and to pilot activities that will build resilience in coastal and delta regions. At the signing ceremony, Win Tun, Myanmar’s min- ister for environmental conservation and forestry, said: “Climate change is one of the most challeng- ing issues of our age and there (is) no time to delay Thomson Reuters Foun- dation ukvor*¾at*sifpDrsm;onf jrefrmEdkifiHESifhta&SUawmiftm&S EdkifiHrsm;&moDOwkajymif;vJrI qdkif&mtusKd;oufa&mufrIrsm; jzpfonfh rdk;acgifa&&Sm;jzpf&yf rsm;? qdkifuvkef;rkefwdkif;ESifh ½kwf w&ufa&BuD;onfhudpö&yfrsm; twGuf BudKwifjyifqifrIrsm; jyKvkyfEdkif&ef oabmwlnDcsuf vufrSwfa&;xdk;cJhaMumif; od& onf/ ukvor*¾at*sifpDESpfckjzpf onfh UNEP ESifh UN-Habitat wdkYonf jrefrmEdkifiH&moDOwk ajymif;vJrIaMumifhjzpfay:vm aomtusKd;oufa&mufrIrsm; twGuf tultnDay;oGm;rnf jzpfaMumif; od&onf/]]&moDOwk ajymif;vJrI&JUtusKd;oufa&muf rIawG[m tckvuf&SdumvrSm trsm;qHk;cHpm;ae&ygw,f/ 'ghtjyif vmrnfhtem*wfumv rSmvnf; 'Dxufydkrdkjyif;xefwm awGjzpfvmOD;rSmyg}}[kUN-Habitat tm&Sypdzdwfa'oqdkif&mñTef Mum; a&; rSL; Y o s h i n o b u Fukasawa u ajymcJhonf/ 2008 ckESpf arvu qdkifuvkef; em*pfrkefwdkif;aMumifh vlOD;a& 1 odef; 4 aomif;eD;yg;aoqHk;cJh& um tqdkygrkefwdkif;aMumifh &efukef ESifh{&m0wDwdkif;a'oBuD;twGif;&Sd aus;&Gmrsm;? pyg;pdkufcif;rsm;ESifh vlOD;a& 2 'or 4 oef;tay: oufa&mufrIrsm;&SdcJhNyd; urÇmBuD; ylaEG;vmrIaMumifh tqdkygrkefwdkif; uJhodkYrkefwdkif;rsm; xyfrHjzpfyGm; vmzG,f&Sdonf[k odyÜHynm&Sifrsm; u cefYrSef;Muonf/ tqdkygukv or*¾at*sifpDESpfck tultnD jzifh obm0ywf0ef;usifxdef;odrf; a&;ESifhopfawma&;&m0efBuD;Xme onfav;ESpfoufwrf;&SdtpDtpOf wpfckudk taumiftxnfazmf aqmif&GufrnfjzpfNyD; ,if;tpD tpOftwGuf Oa&myor*¾rS ,l½dkav;oef; (tar&duefa':vm 5 'or 45 oef;) udk ulnDyHhydk; ay;oGm;rnf[k od&onf/ tqdkygtpDtpOfonf tpdk;& vlrItzGJUtpnf;rsm;? okawoe ynm&Sifrsm;ESifh yk*¾vdutcef; u@rsm;tMum;wGif &moDOwk ajymif;vJa&;ESifhywfoufí em;vnfoabmaygufrI jrifhrm; vmap&ef &nf&G,fjcif;jzpfonf/ xdkYjyif obm0ywf0ef;usifxdef; odrf;a&;ESifhopfawma&;&m0efBuD; OD;0if;xGef;uvnf; &moDOwk ajymif;vJrIonf ,aeYacwfwGif pdefac:rItjyif;xefqHk;udpöwpfck jzpfaeNyD; ,if;udpöudk qefYusif wdkufcdkuf&eftcsdefrqGJoifhaMumif; ajymMum;cJhonf/ Japan’s KDDI, Sumitomo Corp Strike Myanmar Telecoms Deal To invest $2 billion Wai Linn Kyaw K DDI and Sumito- mo Corp will invest in telecoms infra- structure and jointly oper- ate mobile and broadband services with Myanmar Posts and Telecommuni- announced. No.2 Japanese wire- less carrier KDDI and trading house Sumitomo said last week that they have reached an agree- ment with the state-run MPT to jointly undertake telecommunications op- erations in the Southeast Asian country. The joint operations will provide “Japanese- quality services of the highest level in the world” communication services through upgrading of the telecommunications in- said. The operations will fo- cus on customer services in call centres and shops to improve customer satisfaction, as well as contribute to the devel- opment of Myanmar’s economy and industry and the enhancement of Myanmar’s citizens’ standard of living, KDDI and Sumitomo said. “Myanmar is experienc- ing a rapid move towards democracy and the market line communications is expected to grow dramati- cally in the future,” said Takashi Tanaka, president of KDDI Corp. “Taking advantage of the wealth of experience and knowledge that we have built up both inside and outside Japan through our mobile phone operations in Mongolia, MVNO busi- ness in the US and other operations, KDDI will provide the same level of Japanese-quality services to Myanmar and contrib- ute to the country’s growth and development.” MPT will split earnings from the Myanmar opera- tions roughly equally with a Singapore-based joint venture of the Japanese in August, Sumitomo Ex- ecutive Vice President Shinichi Sasaki told a news conference. - vest about $2 billion over the next decade to ex- pand service in one of the world’s least-connected countries. “We’ll be able to reach - riod of time,” KDDI Sen- ior Vice President Yuzo Ishikawa said. Kuniharu Nakamura, president and CEO of Su- mitomo, said: “Our busi- ness record in Myanmar stretches over 60 years .... Using the know-how and experience that we have thus cultivated, we will do our part to support the improvement of living standards and industrial development in Myanmar through this joint opera- tion.” MPT is currently My- anmar’s sole telecoms operator as well as the industry regulator. The government plans to cre- ate a new regulator by 2015 and divest a minor- ity share in MPT, which will remain one of four licensed operators. State- backed Yatanarpon, until now primarily an inter- net service provider, also holds a licence. Norway’s Telenor and Qatar’s Oore- doo won hotly contested bidding for two new li- cences in June 2013 and are now building their networks. Myanmar’s telecoms industry was tightly con- trolled under decades of military dictatorship, with the government monopolising the sector and selling SIM cards for thousands of dollars when they were introduced a decade-and-a-half ago. As a result, Myanmar had one of the world’s lowest mobile penetra- tion rates. Swedish tel- ecom giant Ericsson said in 2012 that fewer than 4 percent of its 60 million people were connected. *syefqufoG,fa&;ukrÜPDESpfck jzpfonfh KDDI ESifh qlrDrdkwdk aumfydka&;&Sif;wdkYonf jrefrmEdkifiH qufoG,fa&;tajccHtaqmuf ttHkESifhrdkbdkif;qufoG,fa&;vkyf ief;rsm; Broad Band vkyfief; rsm;aqmif&Guf&eftwGuf jrefrmh qufoG,fa&;vkyfief;ESifhoabm wlnDrI&cJhonf/ jrefrmEdkifiH 'kwd,tBuD;qHk;BudK;rJhqufoG,f a&;vkyfief;rsm;udk 0efaqmifrIay; aeonfh tqdkygukrÜPDonf vGefcJh onfhtywfu jrefrmhqufoG,f a&;vkyfief;ESifhoabmwlnDrI&&Sd cJhonf[k tqdkygukrÜPDtkyfpku aMunmcJhonf/ tqdkygtusKd;wlyl;aygif;aqmif &GufrIwGif *syefukrÜPDESifh jrefrmh qufoG,fa&;vkyfief;wkYdonf tusKd;tjrwfrsm;udk nDwlnDrQ&&Sd MurnfjzpfNyD; KDDI ESifh qlrDrdkwdk wdkYonf jrefrmjynfqufoG,f a&;u@twGuf aemufq,fpkESpf wpfpktwGif;tar&duefa':vm oef;ESpfaxmifcefY &if;ESD;jr§KyfESHoGm; rnf[k od&onf/
  13. 13. July 24-30, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com REGIONAL BIZ 13 Myanmar Summary Samsung Halts Business with Chinese Supplier Over Child Labour Fears Se Young Lee S amsung Electron- ics Co Ltd said last Monday it had sus- pended business with a Chinese supplier it sus- pected of employing child labour, less than a week after a U.S. watchdog report accused the sup- plier of using under-aged workers. The South Korean smartphone maker said it found an “illegal hir- ing process” at Dongguan Shinyang Electronics Co Ltd, which supplies mo- bile phone covers and parts. Dongguan Shinyang Electronics could not im- mediately be reached for comment. South Korean - ing Co Ltd., which owns all of Dongguan Shin- yang, also could not be immediately reached for comment. Samsung added that it had previously found no child workers at the Chi- nese company in three au- dits since 2013. The latest audit ended on June 25. “The Chinese authori- ties are also looking into the case,” Samsung said in a statement on Mon- day, adding that it would cut all ties with the sup- plier if the allegations were true. “If the investigations conclude that the suppli- er indeed hired children illegally, Samsung will permanently halt busi- ness with the supplier in accordance with its zero- tolerance policy on child labour,” it said. U.S.-based China La- bour Watch released a report on Thursday alleg- used child labour. The U.S. watchdog said it had workers” without con- tracts at the supplier. Samsung demands sup- pliers adopt a hiring pro- cess that includes face-to- face interviews and the use of scanners to detect fake IDs, to ensure no child labourers are em- ployed. But China Labour Watch said that Sam- sung’s monitoring system The watchdog accused one of Samsung’s suppli- ers of using child labour in 2012. Samsung subse- quently said it found no under-aged workers at the facility. Reuters A man uses his mobile phone in front of a giant advertisement promoting Samsung Electronics’ new Galaxy S5 smartphone, at an art hall in central Seoul. KimHong-Ji/Reuters qrfaqmif;ukrÜPDtm; ukef Murf;jznfhqnf;ay;aeaom w½kwfukrÜPDrsm;wGif touf rjynfhao;aom uav;tvkyf orm;rsm;tm; cdkif;apaeonf[k tar&duefapmifhMunfha&;tzGJU tpnf;u xkwfjyefcJhNyD; oDwif; wpfywftwGif;wGif qrfaqmif; u ,if;odkYoHo,&Sdaom w½kwf ukrÜPDrsm;ESifh vkyfief;&yfqdkif; xm;aMumif;xkwfjyefvdkufonf/ rdkbdkif;zkef;tcGHrsm;ESifh tpdwf tydkif;rsm; xkwfvkyfaom 'Gef*Grf &Sif;&ef;vQyfppfypönf;ukrÜPDwGif ]]w&m;r0ifvkyfom;iSm;&rf;jcif;}} rsm;&SdaMumif; qrfaqmif;u qdk onf/ 'Gef*Grftm; qufoG,far;jref; ydkifqdkifaom awmifukd&D;,m; vkyfief; &Sif;&ef;tif*sifeD,m ukrÜPDxHodkYvnf; qufoG,fEdkif cJhjcif;r&Sday/ 2013ckESpfrSpíxdkukrÜPDtm; oHk;Budrfpm&if;ppfcJh&mwGifuav; vkyfom; ,cifu awGU&SdcJhjcif; r&SdaMumif;ESifhaemufqHk;pm&if;ppf cJhcsdefrSm ZGef 25 wGifjzpfaMumif; qrfaqmif;u qdkonf/ w½kwftmPmydkifrsm;uvnf; pHkprf;ppfaq;rIjyKvkyfaeNyD; pGyfpGJ csufrsm; rSefuefaMumif;awGU&Sd ygu ,if;ukefMurf;jznfhqnf; onfhukrÜPDESifh tquftoG,f rsm;tm;vHk; jzwfawmufrnfjzpf aMumif; qrfaqmif;u qdkonf/
  14. 14. July 24-30, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com REGIONAL BIZ 14 Myanmar Summary China Urges Local Governments to Buy More New-Energy Cars Samuel Shen and Norhiko Shirouzu C hina has told gov- use more electric and plug-in hybrid cars as part of its drive to cut pol- lution by putting 5 million such vehicles on the road by 2020. The measure is the lat- est in a series of steps that could help Chinese au- tomakers including BYD and SAIC Motor Corp, with President Xi Jinping urg- ing government agencies to buy domestic brands. So-called new-energy vehicles must account for at least 30 percent of all cars or vans purchased an- nually by central govern- ment agencies and some city governments over the three year through 2016, with the proportion set to rise after that, said the National Government Of- Government agencies buy new-energy vehicles, which the government - hicles, plug-in electric hy- brids and hydrogen elec- tric fuel-cell cars. Under the new step, are also required to build charging stations and im- prove other infrastructure for green vehicles. The new rules came days after China scrapped a purchase tax for new- energy vehicles, fearing that it had fallen far be- hind in meeting a target of putting 500,000 new- energy vehicles on the road by next year. Earlier this year, major Chinese cities including Beijing, Shanghai and Tianjin opened up their markets to electric car makers based in other cities as China moves to reduce intra-country pro- tectionism. Reuters Modi’s Farm Export Curbs may Ease Manoj Kumar I - ably eased margin- ally in June after the new government curbed farm exports, but a grow- ing risk that drought will shrivel summer crops could encourage the cen- tral bank to keep interest rates on hold. Prime Minister Nar- endra Modi, elected in May amid anger over ris- ing prices, has ordered a crackdown on hoarding to hold down food prices and set limits on the ex- port of staples, such as onions and potatoes. budget on Thursday, Fi- nance Minister Arun Jait- - gross domestic product in - cating more funds to ease “The monsoon this year appears more unpredict- able,” he told lawmakers, adding that the govern- ment would take all steps necessary. - tion INCPIY=ECI prob- ably eased to 7.95 percent last month, down from 8.28 percent in May, while wholesale price in- to 5.80 percent, the Reu- ters poll of economists found. The government will re- lease the data on whole- sale prices on Monday around 0230 EST. Con- sumer price data is due at 0800 EST. - lenge as soaring prices for basic food items, such as milk and potatoes, lifted 9.4 percent in May, driv- percent. The government is banking on stocks of food such as rice, wheat and sugar from recent bumper harvests, but has few ways to cap prices of fruits and vegetables that drive food “The measures may prove to be inadequate in light of the supply- demand dynamics as- sociated with perishable products, absence of ad- equate cold storages and - mestic supply chain,” said Aditi Nayar, an economist at ICRA, the Indian arm of rating agency Moody’s. eased to about 8 percent, after staying in near dou- past two years, the highest among the BRICS group of emerging economies - Brazil, Russia, India, Chi- na and South Africa. Economic growth has been stuck below 5 per- cent for two years - the longest slowdown in more than a quarter of a century. The economy is expected to grow slightly above 5 percent in this In 2009 benchmark New York futures swept to a 30-year high after the worst drought in nearly four decades forced India, the world’s top sugar con- sumer, to buy large quan- tities of the sweetener from top producer Brazil. The farm sector ac- counts for around 14 percent of India’s nearly $2 trillion economy, and two-thirds of its popula- tion of 1.2 billion live in rural areas. Weak investments and industrial performance have hurt economic Friday showing that in- dustrial output grew 4.7 percent in May on the year bettered expecta- tions for a rise of 3.8 per- cent. Output gained just 0.1 that ended in March. Reuters Myanmar Summary Workers sit and lie on stacked bags of sortex rice during their lunch break at a warehouse in a wholesale market in Mumbai. DhirajSingh/Bloomberg A model poses next to the Dongfeng EJ02 during the opening day of the Shanghai Auto Show. AlySong/Reuters w½kwftpdk;&onf 2020 wGif vrf;ay:odkY vQyfppfESifh[dkufb&pf zufpyfum;ta&twGuf ig;oef; cefYudk vrf;ay:wifjcif;jzifh avxk npfnrf;rIavQmhcsa&;tpDtpOf tm; vQyfppfum; odkYr[kwf tm;oGif;&onfh[dkufb&pfzufpyf um;rsm; ydkrdkoHk;pGJ&ef wdkufwGef; vdkufonf/ or®wZDusif;yifu tpdk;&Xme rsm;tm;jynfwGif;um;trSwfwHqdyf rsm; ydkrdk0,f,l&ef wdkufwGef;rItyg t0if txufygwdkufwGef;csufrSm jynfwGif;um;xkwfvkyfolrsm;jzpf aom BYD ESifh SAIC Motor vkyfief;wdkYtwGuf tusKd;&SdapEdkif aom tpdk;& vkyfaqmifcsuf rsm;xJrSaemufqHk;wpf&yfjzpfonf/ A[dktpdk;&Xmersm;ESifh tcsKdU aom NrdKUawmftpdk;&rsm; 2016 ckESpftxd oHk;ESpftwGif; 0,f,l aomum;rsm; tenf;qHk; 30 &mcdkifEIef;rSm xdkvQyfppfum;rsm; jzpf&rnf[ktrsKd;om;tpdk;&tkyf csKyfa&;½Hk;uxkwfjyefvdkufonf/ tpdk;&Xmersm;taejzifhxdkvQyfppf um;opfrsm;0,f,lEdkif&efaxmufyHh aMu;rsm; csay;rnfjzpfNyD; ,if; um;rsm;udk&mEIef;jynfhvQyfppfum;? tm;oGif;[dkufb&pfvQyfppfum; ESifh[dkuf'½dk*sifavmifpmoHk;vQyfppf um;[lí tpdk;&u oHk;rsKd;cGJjcm; xm;aMumif; od&onf/ tdE´d,tpdk;&opfonf v,f,m xGufukefwifydkYrIrsm;udk avQmhcs vdkufNyD;aemufaiGaMu;azmif;yGrI rSm tenf;i,fjyefvnfusqif; vmaomfvnf; rdk;acgifa&&Sm;rI aMumifh rdk;&moDoD;ESHrsm; ysufpD; Edkifajc&SdonfhtwGuf A[dkbPf taejzifh twdk;EIef;rsm;udk quf vufxdef;xm;&ef vdktyfvmEdkif onf/ ukefaps;EIef;jrifhwufrItay: jynfolrsm; trsufa'goxGuf aerIrsm;tMum; arvwGif a&G; aumufcHcJh&aom 0efBuD;csKyf em&ef'grdk'Donf tpm;tpmaps; EIef;rsm; avQmhcs&ef tpm;tpm odkavSmifjcif;rsm;tm; wdkufzsuf &ef trdefYay;xm;cJhNyD; MuufoGefeD ESifhtmvl;uJhodkYt"dutpm;tpm rsm;wifydkYrIudkvnf; uefYowfcsuf rsm; owfrSwfcJhonf/ rMumao;rDu yxrqHk;&oHk; aiGpm&if;wifoGif;vmaomb@m a&;0efBuD;t½l*sdKufavu b@m a&;vdkaiGjyrIudk jynfwGif;pkpkaygif; xkwfvkyfrIwefzdk; (GDP) 4 'or 1 &mcdkifEIef;wGif xdef; xm;&ef uwdjyKxm;NyD; aiGaMu; zdtm;rsm;udk ajz&Sif;&ef b@m aiGrsm; xyfrHcsxm;ay;rnfjzpf aMumif;vnf; od&onf/
  15. 15. July 24-30, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com REGIONAL BIZ 15 Myanmar Summary Myanmar Summary Shamim Adam M alaysian Airline System Bhd. (MAS) shares tumbled the most in nine weeksafteroneofitsplanes was shot down in Ukraine, four months after the dis- appearance of Flight 370 contributed to the carrier’s biggest loss since 2011. The stock lost 13 per- cent to 19.5 sen as of 9:59 a.m. on July 18 in Kuala Lumpur, extend- ing this year’s drop to 37 percent, while Malaysia Airports Holdings Bhd. (MAHB) fell 4.2 percent. The FTSE Bursa Malay- siaKLCI Index retreated 0.4 percent and Malay- sia’s ringgit weakened 0.4 percent versus the dollar. The Bloomberg World Airlines Index slipped 0.2 percent, following a 2 percent tumble on July 17 amid speculation the Malaysian Air’s Flight 17, carrying 298 passen- gers and crew, was shot down last Thursday over eastern Ukraine in an at- tack that the government in Kiev blamed on pro- Russian rebels. The carrier, which has lost 4.57 billion ringgit ($1.4 billion) since the start of 2011, had been speeding up an overhaul of its business after the dis- appearance of Flight 370 spurred the longest search for a missing plane in mod- ern aviation history. “This is shocking,” for strategic investments at Fortress Capital Asset Management Sdn., which oversees about 1 billion ringgit, said in Kuala Lumpur. “Investors will more information later. This will raise concerns about the safety culture of airlines in general.” Ukraine Battle- ground Ltd. (293), the biggest international carrier in Asia, dropped 1.4 per- cent in Hong Kong trad- ing while Air China Ltd. declined 1.3 percent. Del- ta Air Lines Inc., Ameri- can Airlines Group Inc. (AAL) and United Con- tinental Holdings all re- treated more than 3.4 percent in U.S. trading last Thursday. Ukraine’s state security service said it intercept- ed phone conversations among militants discuss- ing the missile strike, which knocked Flight 17 from the sky about 30 kil- ometers (18 miles) from the Russian border. The separatists denied the ac- cusation. weapon probably was a Russian-made model used widely in Eastern Europe. The Boeing Co. (BA) 777 crashed en route to Kuala Lumpur from Amsterdam in the main battleground of Ukraine’s civil war. The jet didn’t make a distress call, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak told reporters at the Kuala Lumpur Inter- national Airport today. was declared safe by the International Civil Avia- tion Organisation, and the International Air Transportation Associa- tion has said the airspace the plane was in was not subject to restrictions, Najib said. Turnaround Struggle The escalation of Ukraine’s crisis, com- bined with Israel’s move- ment of ground forces into the Gaza Strip, equities yesterday. The MSCI All-Country World Index dropped 0.9 per- cent, and lost another 0.1 percent today. Malaysian Air’s ma- jor shareholder and sov- ereign wealth fund, Khaz- anah Nasional Bhd., said last month it had time to come up with a restructur- ing plan as the carrier has funds to last about a year. Asuki Abas, a spokes- man for Khazanah, said the fund will “focus its energy on supporting Ma- laysian Air in emergency comment further. The Subang Jaya, Ma- laysia-based carrier last in 2010. Malaysian Air missed its target to be - ing prices for fuel, main- wiped out revenue gains. Analysts project losses through 2016 for the air- line, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Tough Road “Malaysian Air will have a tough road ahead to re- build its image,” Hong Leong Investment Bank Bhd. analysts wrote in a report last Friday. “Con- sumer sentiment on its safety record will be deep- - ther hampered its hope to turnaround by 2015.” The vanishing of MH370, which carried mostly Chi- nese passengers, put the carrier under global scru- tiny, jeopardizing its repu- tation and prompting boy- cotts in China. It has also hurt the country as a travel destination, with Chinese tourists canceling their vis- its to the Southeast Asian nation, according to Ma- laysia’s tourism promotion agency. “This is beyond unlucky,” Mohshin Aziz, an analyst at Malayan Banking Bhd. in Kuala Lumpur, said in a note to clients. “It will take a very long time to over- turn this.” Bloomberg Low Prices Reduce Production Phobe Sedgman T he sugar market - cit as sustained low prices curb supply for a second year, according to Rabobank International, which joined Czarnikow Group Ltd. and Kingsman SA in forecasting an end to surpluses. Global output of raw sugar will fall short of de- mand by about 900,000 metric tons in the 12 months from October, Rabobank said. That compares with glut of 1.4 million tons in 2013- 2014, the bank said in an e-mailed quarterly report. Raw-sugar prices dropped more than 50 percent from a 30-year high in 2011 as world supplies consistently sur- passed demand. Global output will lag behind consumption by 500,000 tons in 2014-2015 as production stabilizes, London-based Czarnikow forecast last week. The degree of supply tight- ening depends on how a forecast El Nino develops, Rabobank said. “It is a little early to be certain that the market point,” the bank said. “If the question is whether we are cycling towards higher prices, our cur- rent belief is that we are indeed heading in that di- rection, slowly, with may- be a bump or two on the road still to come.” An El Nino, which can bring drought to the heavier-than-usual rains to South America, is likely to develop by Australia’s spring, which starts in September, the country’s Bureau of Meteorology said on July 1. There’s at least a 70 percent chance of the event developing this year, it said. Raw sugar for October delivery closed at 17.07 cents a pound on ICE Fu- tures U.S. in New York on July 11, 4 percent higher this year. The commodity lost 16 percent in 2013, retreating for a third year in the longest run of an- nual declines since 1992. Global sugar demand will exceed production by 239,000 tons in the crop year from October 2014 to September 2015, Lausanne, Switzerland Kingsman SA estimated in May. 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  16. 16. July 24-30, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com INTERNATIONAL BIZ 16 Myanmar Summary Myanmar Summary Deal in Brazil Summit Raymond Colitt Tthe world’s largest emerging markets will showcase a new cur- rency reserve fund and development bank. Crit- ics say neither is enough to revive the group’s wan- ing clout. Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, known as the BRICS, will approve the creation for the $100 billion reserve fund and $50 billion bank at a July 15-16 summit in Brazil’s coastal city of Fortaleza and the capital Brasilia. The initiatives are born out of frustration with a lack of participation in global governance, partic- ularly in the World Bank and International Mon- etary Fund, said Arvind Subramanian, senior fel- low at the Peterson In- stitute for International Economics. The measures aren’t big enough to boost growth or cohesion in the group as foreign in- vestor sentiment sours and member states focus on issues close to home, such as Brazil’s elections, and new economic policy plans in India. “It’s hard to see a lot of impetus at this stage for the BRICS in general and for these initiatives in particular,” Subramanian said by telephone from Washington. “There’s go- ing to be a lot of attention on domestic issues.” Economic growth in the to average 5.37 percent this year, half the pace seen seven years ago, ac- cording to the median estimate of economists surveyed by Bloomberg. Brazil and Russia will grow 1.3 percent and 0.5 percent, respectively. Common Policy Yuri Ushakov, Russian presidential aide on for- eign policy, said in an in- terview that the group’s growth rate is still above that of the global average and that its economic and political weight is increas- ing. The BRICS have evolved from the original term coined in 2001 by then- Goldman Sachs Group Inc. economist Jim O’Neill to describe the growing weight of the largest emerging markets in the global economy. In 2011, South Africa joined to give the BRICS a broad- er geographic representa- tion. The group’s track record in pursuing a com- mon agenda on the world stage has been mixed. “It’s easier to say what the BRICS aren’t than what they are,” said Jose Alfredo Graca Lima, un- der-secretary for politi- Foreign Ministry. to agree on a candidate to head the World Bank in 2012 and the Internation- al Monetary Fund in 2011, two posts at the heart of their demands for more say in global economic matters. Trade Policy The summit is unlikely to provide a common front to push ahead global trade talks either, even though the World Trade Organization is headed by Brazilian Roberto Azevedo. Brazil itself has increased protectionist measures under Presi- AirbusJetRelaunchHeraldsBusyAerospaceShow “I wouldn’t say that there will be a common outcome in that sense, but certainly there will be discussion on WTO mat- ters,” said Sujata Mehta, secretary for economic relations at the Indian Foreign Ministry. India and South Africa have signaled they may backtrack on a trade fa- cilitation agreement reached at the WTO talks in Bali in December 2013, wrote Carlos Braga and Jean-Pierre Lehmann, professors at Lausanne, Switzerland-based IMD business school. Still, Indian Prime Min- ister Narendra Modi is unlikely to rock the boat at the Brazil summit, said N.R. Bhanumurthy, an economist at the Na- tional Institute of Public Finance and Policy, a gov- ernment-backed research institute in New Delhi. “Domestic issues are dominating his agenda, especially growth and in- said. Bloomberg Tim Hepher and Victoria Bryan Athe Farnborough Airshow with up to 100 commitments for its revamped A330neo wide- body jet, industry sources said, deepening a con- test with Boeing for up to $250 billion of orders at the core of the long-haul jet market. After months of specula- tion, the European plane maker will unveil an up- grade of its popular but ageing A330, powered by Rolls-Royce engines and savings. Airbus Group de- clined to comment. The upgraded A330 is Airbus’s attempt to pro- - able twin-aisle jet, as the European company tries to preserve market share against Boeing’s much newer 787 Dreamliner. The A330 has enjoyed a resurgence of sales be- cause of delays in deliv- eries of Boeing’s tech- nically ambitious but - bre jet, but it is in need of a refresh to keep selling. Analysts say it also plugs apotentialfuturegapinthe Airbus wide-body jet port- folio after poor sales of its A350-800 - the minnow of the next-generation A350 family whose development looks set to be halted or suspended as a result. The commercial de- but of two models called A330-800neo and A330- by Reuters, heads a busy schedule of announce- ments on day one of the show, at which Boeing could hit back promptly with new sales of its 787 Dreamliner. Analysts have until now generally predicted a low-key show, because of steadily growing fears of airline overcapacity. But industry sources gathering for the July 14- 20 event said evidence pointed to well over 500 orders or commitments ranging from a 100-plane lessor deal to a single plane for Fiji. It may not be immediately apparent, however, how many or- ders are new. Malaysia’s AirAsiaX has campaigned for an A330neo to save on fuel bills but is seen likely to exchange any new order against at least part of its 38 outstanding current- generation A330s. Boeing begins the week with a clear advantage after gaining 703 gross orders up to July 8, or 649 after cancellations, against Airbus’s end-June total of 515 gross orders and 290 net. Reuters India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi (L-R), Colombia's President Juan Manuel Santos, Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff, Chile's President Michelle Bachelet, China's President Xi Jinping and Ecuador's Presi- dent Rafael Correa talk at a group photo session during the 6th BRICS summit and the Union of South American Nations (UNASUR) in Brasilia. UesleiMarcelino/Reuters Airbus av,mOfxkwfvkyfa&; vkyfief;onf topfjyifqifxm; aom A330 neo udk,fxnfBuD; *sufav,mOfjzifh Farnborough av,mOfjyyGJudk pwifzGifhvSpfrnf jzpfum Boeing av,mOfxkwf vkyfa&;vkyfief;ESifh*sufav,mOf aps;uGuftwGif; ,SOfNydKifrIudk a':vm250 bDvD,Htxdjrifhwuf vmapaMumif; a'owGif;owif; &if;jrpfrsm;u qdkonf/ vaygif;rsm;pGm apmifhMunfhcHcJh &NyD;aemuf Oa&myav,mOfxkwf emrnfausmfaomfvnf;oufwrf; &ifhvmonfh A330 av,mOfudk xkwfjyrnfjzpfNyD; ,if;av,mOf wGif Rolls-Royce tif*sifrsm; wyfqifxm;um qDpm; 14 &mcdkif EIef;oufomaMumif; xkwfjyef xm;onf/ Boeing bufrS enf;ynmydkif; tqifhjrifhaomfvnf; tajctae rwnfNidrfao;aom umbGef- zdkifbm*sufrsm; xkwfvkyfay;&m wGif aESmifhaES;rIrsm;&Sdaeaom aMumifh A330 av,mOfrSm a&mif;cs&rIjyefvnfjrifhwufvsuf &Sdaeonf/ Boeing onf Zlvdkifv 8 &ufaeYtxdtrSmvufcH&&SdrI 703 ck&Sdumjyefvnfy,fzsufrIrsm; udkxnfhwGufvQiftom;wif 649ck&&Sdxm;aomaMumifh Airbus trSmvufcH&&SdrI 515 Budrf ESifh tom;wif 290 BudrfESifh,SOf vQifOD;aqmifvsuf&SdaMumif; od& onf/ b&mZD;? ½k&Sm;? tdE´d,? w½kwf ESifh awmiftmzd&u ponfh urÇmh tBuD;qHk;ay:xGef;paps;uGufig;ck pkpnf;xm;aom BRICS onf a':vm 100 bDvD,Hwef t&ef aiGaMu;&efyHkaiGESifh a':vm 50 bDvD,HwefbPf&efyHkaiGtopf wdkYudk rMumrDusif;yrnfh b&mZD; nDvmcHwGifcGifhjyKay;oGm;rnf[k od&onf/ urÇmhbPfESifh EdkifiHwum aiG aMu;&efyHkaiGtzGJUwdkYuJhodkY EdkifiH wumpD;yGm;a&;udkifwG,fBuD;Muyf rIxJwGif yg0ifqHk;jzwfcGifhenf;yg; jcif;aMumifh txufygajcvSrf;opf rsm;udk aqmif&Gufjcif;jzpfaomf vnf; ,if;wdkYrSm zGHUNzdK;rIudk jr§ifhwif &ef odkYr[kwf tzGJUpkpnf;rIudk ydkrdktm;aumif;ap&ef aqmif&Guf ay;Edkifrnfr[kwfaMumif;ESifhjynfy &if;ESD;jr§KyfESHrIrSm jrifhwufaeNyD; tzGJU0ifEdkifiHrsm;uvnf; jynfxJ a&;ESifhteD;ywf0ef;usiftajctae rsm;udk ydkrdk*½kpdkufae&aMumif; qef;ppfolrsm;u qdkonf/ xdkig;EdkifiH ysrf;rQpD;yGm;a&; zGHUNzdK;rIrSm ,ckESpfwGif 5 'or 37 &mcdkifEIef;&SdNyD; NyD;cJhonfhckepfESpf u &SdcJhonfhEIef; xuf0ufcefY om&SdaMumif; od&onf/ b&mZD; ESifh ½k&Sm;wdkYrSm 1 'or 3 &mcdkif EIef;ESifh okn'or 5 &mcdkifEIef; toD;oD;wdk;wufMurnfjzpfonf/ tzGJUBuD;zGHUNzdK;rIEIef;rSm urÇmh pD;yGm;a&;ysrf;rQzGHUNzdK;rIxuf omvGefaeao;NyD; EdkifiHa&;t&Sdef t0grSmvnf;jrifhwufvmaMumif; ½k&Sm;EdkifiHjcm;a&;rl0g'qdkif&m or®wtBuHay; ,l&Dtl&SmauhmAf u qdkonf/2011 ckESpfwGif awmif tmz&duEdkifiHtzGJU0iftjzpf 0if a&mufvmjcif;aMumifh yx0Da&; t& ydkíus,fjyefYpGmudk,fpm;jyK vmcJhonf/
  17. 17. July 24-30, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com INTERNATIONAL BIZ 17 Myanmar Summary Mal Langsdon I nsurers are eagerly eyeing exponential growth in the tiny cy- ber coverage market but their lack of experience and skills handling hack- ers and data breaches may keep their ambitions in check. hackers seizing sensitive customer data from com- panies, such as U.S. retail- er Target Corp or e-com- merce company eBay Inc, have executives checking their insurance policies. Increasingly, corporate risk managers are seeing insurance against cyber crime as necessary budget spending rather than just nice to have. The insurance broking arm of Marsh & McLen- nan Companies estimates the U.S cyber insurance market was worth $1 bil- lion last year in gross written premiums and could reach as much as $2 billion this year. The European market is cur- rently a fraction of that, at around $150 million, but is growing by 50 to 100 percent annually, accord- ing to Marsh. Those numbers repre- sent a sliver of the overall insurance market, which is growing at a far more sluggish rate. Premiums are set to grow only 2.8 - tion-adjusted terms, ac- cording to Munich Re, the world’s biggest reinsurer. Insurers Struggle to Get Grip on Burgeoning Cyber Risk Market The European cyber coverage market could get a big boost from draft EU data protection rules in the works that would force companies to dis- close breaches of custom- er data to them. “Companies have be- come aware that the risk of being hacked is una- voidable,” said Andreas Schlayer, responsible for cyber risk insurance at Munich Re. “People are now more aware that hackers can attack and do great damage to central infrastructure, for exam- ple in the energy sector.” Insurers, which have more experience handling risks like hurricanes and gain expertise in cyber technology. price by traditional insur- ance methods as there currently is not statisti- data available,” said Rob- ert Parisi, head of cyber products at insurance brokers Marsh. Andrew Braunber- gon, research director at U.S. cybersecurity advi- sory company NSS Labs, said that some energy companies have trouble persuading insurers to provide them with cyber coverage as the industry is vulnerable to hacking attacks that could trigger disasters like an explosion in a worst-case scenario. Pricing on policies for retailers has climbed in the wake of recent high- Neiman Marcus, and oth- er merchants, he added. A Necessary Cost Though still very much in its infancy, the mar- ket’s potential is vast with cyber crime cost- ing the global economy about $445 billion every year, according to an es- timate last month from the Washington-based Center for Strategic and International Studies. While many companies have in the past counted on their general com- mercial liability policies for coverage, they are increasingly taking out standalone contracts. One reason for the change in attitude is a New York state court rul- ing in February against Sony Corp. The company, which has appealed the decision, had sought to force providers of its gen- eral commercial liability insurance to foot the bill for class action lawsuits following a major 2011 cy- ber attack on Sony Play- Station Network. “This issue with Sony is that it did not have a stan- dalone cyber product,” said Peter Beshar, general counsel at the Marsh & McLennan Companies. Target was better pro- tected when some 40 mil- lion payment card num- bers were stolen last year. It had $100 million in cy- ber insurance, according to the trade publication Business Insurance. With low interest rates limiting revenues from insurers’ vast bond port- folios, the extra under- writing income from the fast growing new market is all the more welcome. The cost of cyber insur- ance varies depending, but on average $1 mil- lion in protection ranges from about $20,000 to $25,000, according to Beshar. German insurance giant Allianz says its premiums for 10-50 million euros in protection run about 50,000-90,000 euros in annual premiums. For protection of over 50 mil- lion euros, companies can get coverage up to 300 million euros through co- insurance policies involv- ing multiple underwrit- ers. Whether insurers are - es commensurate with the risks is anyone’s guess as long as underwriters have scant experience with hackers. Growing Pains AXA, Europe’s second biggest insurer, is making a big push into the cyber insurance market, but has so far not paid out a single business claim. “I would like to see a successful claim, because that would be an expe- rience,” said Philippe Derieux, deputy CEO of AXA’s global property and causality business. AXA is hiring computer experts and engineers to build up a centralized cyber team, but Derieux said there is a shortage of “It is hard for insur- people able to handle the product,” Munich Re’s Schlayer said. Reuters Reuters tmrcHvkyfief;rsm;onfqdkufbm tmrcHaps;uGuftqrsm;pGm zGHUNzdK;vmEdkifajcudk rsufpdusvsuf &Sdaomfvnf; [ufumrsm;udk udkifwG,f&ef tawGUtBuHKESifh uRrf;usifrItm;enf;csufESifh tcsuftvufxdk;azmuf&,ljcif; &G,fcsufrsm;udk t&Sdefowfxm;& onf/ aumfydka&;&Sif;xdcdkufEkdifajcqdkif &mrefae*smrsm;onf qdkufbm jypfrItwGuf tmrcHxm;jcif;tm; &SdvQifaumif;onfqdkonfxuf r&Sdrjzpfvdkvmonf[k jrifvmMu onf/tar&duefqdkufbmaps; uGuf&Sd tmrcHpkpkaygif;wefzdk; udkwGufcsufvQifNyD;cJhonfhESpfu a':vmwpfbDvD,H&SdNyD; ,ckESpf wGif ESpfbDvD,Htxdjrifhwufvm EkdifaMumif; od&onf/ ukrÜPDrsm;taejzifh [ufum rsm;tEÅ&m,frSm a&SmifvTJr& EdkifaMumif; odvmMuonf[k qdkufbmtmrcHwm0efcHwpfOD; jzpfol tef'&D;&uf&Sav&mu qdkonf/
  18. 18. July 24-30, 2014 Myanmar Business Today mmbiztoday.com INVESTMENT & FINANCE 18 Myanmar Summary Vietnam’s Biggest Pharmaceutical Aye Myat D HG Pharmaceuti- cal JSC, Vietnam’s largest drugmaker by market value, said it is negotiating with a My- anmar company to start a joint venture in the Southeast Asian country. much as 91 billion dong ($4.3 million) to make pharmaceutical products similar to those it sells in Vietnam, Chief Executive said in an interview with Bloomberg. Construction of a fac- tory in Myanmar may begin next year if agree- ments are reached and approved, Nga said. According to Vietnam- ese media reports, she investment but noted that the company was still in the survey period. “We have just conduct- ed a survey to understand market demand and es- pecially the law in Myan- mar,” she was quoted as saying in the VietNamNet news website. The move comes as Vi- etnamese authorities are tightening their grips on the sale of prescription drugs sold over the coun- ter. “We are preparing for the reduction of antibiotic sales due to tighter con- trol,” Nga told Bloomb- erg. In Vietnam, 78 per- cent of antibiotics are sold through drugstores with- out prescriptions from doctors, according to a re- port by FPT Securities Co. Last year, 41 percent of DHG revenue came from antibiotics. The company also sells analgesics, nu- tritional food, respiratory, cardiovascular and diges- tive medicine and skin- care products. “Myanmar is similar to Vietnam 10-15 years ago, but they can grow faster. Myanmar does not have many pharmaceuti- cal companies. Therefore, they have given some spe- cial incentives for phar- maceutical companies. We will gain an advantage if we cooperate with a local com- pany,” Nga was quoted as saying in Bloomberg. Several Vietnamese en- terprises such as Hoang Anh Gia Lai Group, FPT and the Bank for Invest- ment & Development of Vietnam (BIDV) have al- ready invested in Myan- mar. AD,uferfEdkifiH tBuD;qHk; aq;0g;xkwfvkyfonfhukrÜPDwpfck jzpfNyD; EdkifiHtwGif; aps;uGufa0pk trsm;qHk;&&Sdxm;onfh DHG aq;0g;xkwfvkyfa&;ukrÜPDonf wdkYaps;uGufudk yxrqHk;csJUxGif onfhtaejzifh jrefrmukrÜPD wpfckESifhtusKd;wlyl;aygif;vkyf udkif&efpDpOfvsuf&SdaMumif; od& onf/ tqdkygaq;0g;ukrÜPDonfjrefrm EdkifiHwGif AD,uferfa'gif aiG 91 bDvD,H (tar&duef a':vm 4 'or3)oef;udkaq;0g;xkwfvkyf a&;vkyfief;rsm;ü &if;ESD;jr§KyfESHoGm; rnf[k tqdkygaq;0g;ukrÜPD CEO Phan Thi Viet Nga u bvGef;bwfESifhjyKvkyfcJhaom tifwmAsL;tpDtpOfwpfckwGif ajymMum;cJhonf/oabmwlnD csufrsm; twnfjyKNyD;ygu DHG onf jrefrmEdkifiHwGif aq;0g; xkwfvkyfrnhfpuf½Hkwpfckudk vm rnfhESpftwGif; pwifwnfaqmuf oGm;rnf[k od&onf/ vGefcJhonfh ESpfu DHG 0ifaiG&&SdrI 41 &mcdkifEIef;onf y#dZD0aq;rsm;a&mif;csjcif;rS&&Sd cJhjcif;jzpfNyD;,if;ukrÜPDonft udkuftcJaysmufaq;rsm;? tm [m&jznfhpGuftpm;tpmrsm;? t ouf½SLvrf;aMumif;a&m*gESifh qdkifonfhaq;rsm;? ESvHk;aq;rsm; tjyiftom;ta&xdef;odrf;rI qdkif&mypönf;rsm;udkxkwfvkyf a&mif;csvsuf&Sdonf/ DavidPaulMorris/Bloomberg Banking Licence Race Zwe Wai T he Licensing Com- mittee for the award of banking licence has shortlisted to advance to the next round in the bidding pro- cess to grab a licence to operate in Myanmar. As part of the second stage of the award of banking licences in My- anmar 25 proposals have been received out of the - cants, according to a re- lease from the Central Bank of Myanmar (CBM). UK-based banking gi- ant Standard Chartered pulled out from the race. “The Licensing Commit- tee will now evaluate each RFP response following detailed quantitative and qualitative assess- ment criteria,” the CBM release said. The Licensing Com- mittee will announce the preliminary License ap- proval by the end of third quarter 2014, the Central Bank added. The preliminary ap- proval will be followed by an intervening period in which operations have to be set up. Within the intervening period, the licence re- commitments made in the proposal as well as to take all necessary meas- ures to ensure functional banking operation from day one of business,” the Central Bank said. “The Committee looks forward to analysing their plans for the development of the banking sector” in Myanmar and “to select- ing and announcing the Successful Applicants,” it said. The banks are: ANZ Bank from Australia, In- dustrial and Commercial Bank of China (ICBC); BRED of France; State Bank of India; Japan’s Mizuho Bank, Bank of Tokyo, Mitsubishi UFJ, Sumitomo Mitsu Banking Corp; Malaysia Maybank, OCBC, RHB Bank and CIMB; State Bank of Mau- ritius, Singapore’s OCBC, DBS and United Over- seas Bank; South Korea’s Kookmin Bank, Shinhan Bank and Industrial Bank of Korea; Taiwan’s Ca- thay United Bank, E SUN Contd. P 20...

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