Introductions<br />Balance<br />C.R.A.P. Design<br />Type & Color<br />Information Hierarchy<br />Microsoft Word<br />Adob...
critique<br />
“There is no such thing as information overload…only dismal information design.”<br />- ET<br />Discussion<br /><ul><li> W...
Why do YOU use charts and graphs?</li></li></ul><li>Rule #1 for creating charts & graphs…Don’t.<br />
Thesis Statement<br />In one sentence, what conclusion should the viewer draw from this information?<br />Remember Info. H...
GRAPHS ARE NOT OBJECTIVE!<br />…or they’re useless<br />Show relationships<br />Comparison, Contrast, Causality<br />Use d...
Enable Scanning<br />Order information purposefully<br />Prune data mercilessly<br />Reward Attention<br />Multiple levels...
Exercise<br />
<ul><li>Spend some time with a Tufte book
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Ipt655 Wk10 Representing Quantitative Data

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Tips for creating effective graphic representations of quantitative data sets.

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Ipt655 Wk10 Representing Quantitative Data

  1. 1. Introductions<br />Balance<br />C.R.A.P. Design<br />Type & Color<br />Information Hierarchy<br />Microsoft Word<br />Adobe InDesign I<br />Adobe InDesign II<br />Adobe Photoshop<br />Microsoft PowerPoint<br /><ul><li> Quantitative Information</li></ul>Qualitative Information<br />Abstractions<br />Persuasion<br />IPT 655 Visual Instructional Design<br />Representing Quantitative Data<br />
  2. 2. critique<br />
  3. 3. “There is no such thing as information overload…only dismal information design.”<br />- ET<br />Discussion<br /><ul><li> What was the last memorable graph you saw?
  4. 4. Why do YOU use charts and graphs?</li></li></ul><li>Rule #1 for creating charts & graphs…Don’t.<br />
  5. 5. Thesis Statement<br />In one sentence, what conclusion should the viewer draw from this information?<br />Remember Info. Hierarchy<br />Templatize charts and graphs<br />Use “table styles”<br />Contrast, again.<br />When everything is highlighted…<br />Focus, Focus, Focus!<br />
  6. 6. GRAPHS ARE NOT OBJECTIVE!<br />…or they’re useless<br />Show relationships<br />Comparison, Contrast, Causality<br />Use design principles to guide attention<br />Reasons to Believe<br />Annotation<br />Transparency<br />
  7. 7. Enable Scanning<br />Order information purposefully<br />Prune data mercilessly<br />Reward Attention<br />Multiple levels of detail<br />Subtle relationships<br />1000 words<br />Resolution<br />
  8. 8.
  9. 9.
  10. 10. Exercise<br />
  11. 11. <ul><li>Spend some time with a Tufte book
  12. 12. The Visual Display of Quantitative Data
  13. 13. Envisioning Information
  14. 14. Visual Explanations
  15. 15. Beautiful Evidence
  16. 16. Create a chart or graph to represent the given data.</li></ul>Assignment<br />
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