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Transforming government through e-democracy

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Presented at Cutter Consortium Summit 2010. Case study outlining KLISS - Kansas Legislative InformTransforming government through e democracy - panel discussion and case study propylon-version2ation …

Presented at Cutter Consortium Summit 2010. Case study outlining KLISS - Kansas Legislative InformTransforming government through e democracy - panel discussion and case study propylon-version2ation Systems and Services. Original presentation included panel discussion 'Transforming government through e democracy'


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  • 1. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature E-Government Case Study Propylon, Kansas State Legislature & Cutter Consortium Transforming Government Through E-Democracy “We the people” ...iPad enabled
  • 2. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 2 ● Contributor Profiles ● What do we mean by eGovernment? ● From Great Ideas to Real Action in Government Bob Benson, Cutter Consortium ● How We Once Made a Bill Don Heiman, Kansas State Legislature ● Strong Program Management Don Heiman and Alan Weis, Kansas State Legislature ● KLISS – Next Gen Legislative Enterprise Architecture Sean McGrath, Propylon Inc. ● Summation - How Will Government Transform? Ken Orr, Cutter Consortium Contents
  • 3. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 3 About Cutter’s e-Government Practice Cutter’s team of experts has considerable experience assisting government and public sector organizations around the world with their business-technology endeavors. The Consortium’s great strength is that it can draw on its more than 150 best-in-class consultants to assemble the ideal team to help clients tackle any challenges they might face.
  • 4. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 4 Mitchell Ummel is the Director of Cutter’s e-Government Practice, a Senior Consultant with Cutter's Enterprise Architecture practice and President of UmmelGroup International, Inc., a US-based business and technology management consulting firm. Mr. Ummel is a visionary who is most well known for championing practical application of innovative but lightweight IT process improvement methodologies into today's culture within large organizations. In recent years, he has enjoyed advising state governments and private-sector enterprises in their planning and architecture for large, multimillion-dollar business and technology transformations. Mr. Ummel's IT experience spans 25 years and includes service in a variety of CIO, executive management, training, coaching, mentoring, and consulting roles for government, telecommunications, electric/gas utilities, monitored home security, health insurance, regulatory/licensure, law enforcement, justice, and a variety of Internet-based product or services companies. Earlier in his career, he served as a state of Kansas agency CIO. Mr. Ummel holds advanced degrees in mathematics and computer science and can be reached at consulting@cutter.com. His complete bio can be found at www.cutter.com/meet-our-experts/ummelm.html Mitchell Ummel
  • 5. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 5 Robert Benson is a Fellow with Cutter Consortium's Business-IT Strategies and Government & Public Sector practices. He has assisted federal, state, and local government and educational agencies since 1966 with specific expertise in strategic and financial IT management, strategic IT planning, application portfolio management, PMO management, effective IT application development, and IT governance in all levels of government. His career includes extensive management and technical responsibilities as well as teaching and research experience. For 40 years, Mr. Benson taught computer science and information management at Washington University in St. Louis (USA), where he also served as Associate Vice Chancellor for Computing and Communications, Dean, CIO, and in various financial executive positions. He has also taught information management at Tilburg University (the Netherlands) for 20 years and is a member of its faculty. Mr. Benson is also a Principal in The Beta Group. Mr. Benson is coauthor of several books and numerous articles and monographs, including From Business Strategy to IT Action: Right Decisions for a Better Bottom Line, Information Economics: Linking Information Technology and Business Performance and Information Strategy and Economics: Linking Information Systems Strategy to Business Performance. He has also written more than 100 Cutter Consortium E-Mail Advisors on business technology strategy and IT governance as well as additional Executive Reports, Updates, and Cutter journals. Mr. Benson holds a bachelor of science degree in engineering science and a law degree, both from Washington University. He can be reached at consulting@cutter.com. Robert Benson
  • 6. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 6 Don Heiman is the Chief Information Technology Officer for the Kansas Legislature.  He also was the Chief Information Technology Officer for the Executive Branch, Chief Information Technology Architect, and Director of the Division of Information Systems and Communications. Prior to joining the Executive Branch, Don was the Director of Performance Audits in the Legislative Division of Post Audit.  He has been with the State of Kansas 35 years. He holds Master degrees in pastoral studies, business, and public administration from University of Kansas, and Loyola University New Orleans.  His undergraduate degree is in Business from Rockhurst University.  His authorships include training films, academic journals, and text books on topics related to organizational behavior research, learning theory, and information technologies. His professional certifications are in Government financial management, IT financial administration, and project management. Don Heiman
  • 7. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 7 Alan Weis has over 30 years of experience in the information technology field. He currently serves the Kansas Legislature as the Assistant Director for Applications and Software and is the Project Manager for the Kansas Legislative Information Systems and Services (KLISS) software application. Prior to the Kansas Legislature, Alan was employed as the Director of Information Technology at KTEC, a State of Kansas owned corporation providing economic development services to Kansas technology companies. Alan has also held positions as Network Manager of Telecommunications at St. Francis Hospital in Topeka, Kansas and as a Licensed Electronic Technician at Santa Fe Railroad. Alan has served on many boards, committees, and advisory groups dealing with Information Technology in the State of Kansas. Alan holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics and Mathematics from Washburn University of Topeka and also holds a technical degree in electronics maintenance. Alan is certified by the State of Kansas in the Information Technology Project Management. Alan Weis
  • 8. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 8 Sean McGrath is the CTO of Propylon. He has twenty five years of experience in the IT industry, most of it in the legal and regulatory publishing space. He holds a first class honors degree in Computer Science from Trinity College Dublin. He served as an invited expert to the W3C special interest group that created the XML standard. He is the author of three books on markup languages published in the Dr Charles F. Goldfarb Series on Open Information Management, published by Prentice Hall. Sean is based in Lawrence, Kansas where he lives with his wife and three children. Sean McGrath
  • 9. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 9 Ken Orr is an internationally recognized expert on business process re- engineering, technology transfer, software engineering, data warehousing, and knowledge management. He is the founder and Principal Researcher of The Ken Orr Institute, a business technology research organization. Previously, Ken was the first Director of the Division of Information and Communications Systems, State of Kansas. Ken was also an Affiliate Professor and Director of the Center for the Innovative Application of Technology with the School of Technology and Information Management at Washington University (St. Louis). Ken has a B.A. from Wichita State University, has done graduate work in Philosophy at the University of Chicago, and has more than 35 years of experience in research, analysis, design, project management, technology planning, and management consulting. Ken Orr
  • 10. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 10 First … What Do We Mean By eGovernment? e-Government  (short for electronic government, also known as e-gov, digital government, online government, or connected government) is creating a comfortable, transparent, and cheap interaction between government and citizens (G2C – government to citizens), government and business enterprises (G2B –government to business enterprises) and relationship between governments (G2G – inter-agency relationship) source: Wikipedia
  • 11. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 11 The Many Dimensions of eGovernment Gov 2.0 Gov 3.0 eDemocracy Digital Democracy G2C G2B G2G Open Government C2G
  • 12. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 12 Understanding G2C, G2G, and G2B
  • 13. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 13 Focus Areas – The Traditional View ● Government to Citizen (G2C) increased government transparency, freedom of information access anytime, anywhere, anyhow, etc. ● Citizen to Government (C2G) e-Democracy, digital voting, constituent services, legislative process, etc. ● Government to Government (G2G) increased levels of interagency collaboration, information sharing, intelligence and knowledge management, etc. ● Government to Business (G2B) public/private partnerships, increased collaboration between government and private sector, increased government support for business development, etc.
  • 14. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 14 TRANSITIONAL View of eDemocracy ● In the G2C/C2G area, eDemocracy is receiving highest focus. ● Includes government accountability, accessibility, and transparency features ● Includes new channels for citizen to government and government to citizen interaction. ● Spans all three branches of government … Legislative, Executive, and Judicial Through this coming decade we will be moving full speed towards a TRANSFORMATIONAL eDemocracy architecture … more on this later. Image copyright unknown
  • 15. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 15 What Does Transformational e-Democracy Mean To You?
  • 16. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 16 From Great Ideas to Real Action in Government Bob Benson Transforming Government Through e-Democracy
  • 17. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 17 Background ● Federal Reserve System ● State of Kansas ● State of South Dakota ● State of Missouri ● SPF – Mexico Federal Government ● St Louis Public Schools ● Sandia NationalLaboratory ● USA – FBI ● USA – ATF ● USA – Department of Justice ● USA – Government Printing Office ● USA – USGS ● USA – Customs and Border Protection
  • 18. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 18 Process Portfolio Management & Program / Project Prioritization Strategic I T Planning Process Financial Management & Cost Containment PMO & Project Business- Value Delivery Processes & Service Level Agreements Governance & Bridging the Process Management Gap Transformative Government Strategic Business / Process Planning Place Strategic Intentions, Process Portfolios, and Services at the Center of IT & Government
  • 19. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 19 The Challenges Getting the Great Ideas ➔ Vision ➔ Innovation ➔ Collaboration Getting Action to Occur ➔ Dealing with Governance ➔ Dealing with Change
  • 20. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 20 A Process to Address The Challenges Innovation IT Capability (Potential for new business directions) Business Units and Processes (Strategic Agenda for use of IT) Demand / Supply IT (Strategy for the Supply of IT) Business Strategic Plan (Demand) Strategic Intentions IMPACT ALIGNMENT Getting the Great Ideas ➔ Vision ➔ Innovation ➔ Collaboration Getting Action to Occur ➔ Dealing with Governance ➔ Dealing with Change
  • 21. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 21 The Value Chain in Transformative Government Business Plan (Annual) IT Plan (Annual) Business Strategic Intentions (Strategic Business Plan) Strategic IT Planning Projects Performance Measurement Metrics Annual IT Planning Action and Results Strategic IT Requirements Strategic IT Agenda Strategic IT Plan Enterprise Architecture Project Plan (Annual) Projects Budget Lights-On Budget The Business Enterprise Organization: Lines of Business, Departments Effective Planning Appropriate Resource Decisions Workable Budgets, Projects, & Operational Plans Business Strategies IT Actions Bottom- Line Results Performance Measurement, Metrics ١ ١٢ ٤٢ ١١ ١٠ ٨ ٦ ٩ ٧ ٥ ٣ Assessed Portfolios (Alignment, Service/Quality, Technology) 2 1. Strategic Planning including Financing 2. The Multi-Year Program 3. Annual Planning 4. Budgeting DEMAND SUPPLY
  • 22. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 22 General Process Step Primary Purpose Provide IT Strategic Input into Business Strategies and Plans Step One Identify business mission and key management team objectives. Step Two Visioning and Innovation: awareness of IT potential for contributing to new and existing business strategy Identify Business Strategies and Plans Step Three Establish or Identify business strategic intentions at a company level Step Four Establish or Identify, for each key business organization, strategic objectives and initiatives Establish IT Role in meeting Business Strategies and Plans Step Five Define the Strategic Agenda for the Use of IT; identify strategic intentions for the use of IT in the company Assess As Is Process and IT Service Portfolios Step Six Define the Strategic Objectives and Initiatives for the use of IT in each key business organization Prepare IT Strategies and Plans Step Seven Define the Strategic IT Plan for the IT organization; define the strategic intentions, objectives, and initiatives for the delivery of IT The Original Planning Model
  • 23. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 23 23 The Value Chain in Transformative Government Business Plan (Annual) IT Plan (Annual) Business Strategic Intentions (Strategic Business Plan) Strategic IT Planning Projects Performance Measurement Metrics Annual IT Planning Action and Results Strategic IT Requirements Strategic IT Agenda Strategic IT Plan Enterprise Architecture Project Plan (Annual) Projects Budget Lights-On Budget The Business Enterprise Organization: Lines of Business, Departments Effective Planning Appropriate Resource Decisions Workable Budgets, Projects, & Operational Plans Business Strategies IT Actions Bottom- Line Results Performance Measurement, Metrics ١ ١٢ ٤٢ ١١ ١٠ ٨ ٦ ٩ ٧ ٥ ٣ Assessed Portfolios (Alignment, Service/Quality, Technology) 2 1. Strategic Planning including Financing 2. The Multi-Year Program 3. Annual Planning 4. Budgeting DEMAND SUPPLY V I S I O N Process / Service Portfolios
  • 24. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 24 The “Meta” Principles for Transformative E-Government The Strategic Foundation 1. Compelling Transformative Vision 2. Inclusive Vision 3. Connection to All Governance 4. Creative Financing 5. Non-Technical View for Key Sponsors 6. Full IT Consolidation The Implementation Foundation 1. Holistic and Complete Business Process View 2. Strong As Is Case / Assessment 3. Sound IT Planning and Management 4. Sound Architecture / Integration Vision 5. Holistic Project Management 6. Common View among Stakeholders 7. Risk Mitigation Focus
  • 25. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 25 The Strategic Foundation 1. Compelling Transformative Vision 2. Inclusive Vision 3. Connection to All Governance 4. Creative Financing 5. Non-Technical View for Key Sponsors 6. Full IT Consolidation The Implementation Foundation 1. Holistic and Complete Business Process View 2. Strong As Is Case / Assessment 3. Sound IT Planning and Management 4. Sound Architecture / Integration Vision 5. Holistic Project Management 6. Common View among Stakeholders 7. Risk Mitigation Focus The “Meta” Principles for Transformative E-Government
  • 26. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 26 The Result - Producing …. With Leadership With Vision With Persistence Great and Glorious Ideas and Good Things Happen Innovation IT Capability (Potential for new business directions) Business Units and Processes (Strategic Agenda for use of IT) Demand / Supply IT (Strategy for the Supply of IT) Business Strategic Plan (Demand) Strategic Intentions IMPACT ALIGNMENT
  • 27. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 27 How We Once Made a Bill The Kansas State Legislature Don Heiman Transforming Government Through e-Democracy
  • 28. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 28 STEP 1 – Idea is Captured ● Legislator visits with an attorney in the Revisor’s Office ● Research is performed by the attorney and draft is written ● The draft text is typed into a text database word processor residing on a mainframe legacy platform ● The bill is printed and given to legislators who sponsor the bill DAY 1 - 10:00
  • 29. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 29 STEP 2 – Bill Amendment ● Bill is introduced and hearings are conducted. Those for, against, and neutral testify. Meeting minutes are taken ● When the bill passes from committee, it is introduced for chamber consideration ● A Bill Amendment is typed in Word Perfect by a chamber knowledge worker DAY 1 - 12:00
  • 30. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 30 STEP 3 – Print, Cut & Paste ● Part time clerical staff print the Word Perfect documents ● The clerks physically cut out the amendment text using scissors. The strips are arranged in the order of how the amendments will appear in the bill. ● They are glued to the bill and their insertion point is drawn with different colored pens as new text. Deleted text is marked through. This document is referred to as a “Flagged Bill” DAY 1 - 14:00
  • 31. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 31 STEP 4 – Proofing ● Proof readers review notes from the chamber session and confirm the bill has been flagged properly ● Errors are corrected ● Logging occurs DAY 1 - 15:00
  • 32. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 32 STEP 5 – Interoffice transmission ● The proofed bill is put into a transmittal envelope DAY 1 - 16:00
  • 33. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 33 STEP 6 – Transportation to the State Printing Office ● The proofed bill is transported to the State Printer DAY 1 - 17:00
  • 34. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 34 STEP 7 – Bill Typesetting ● During the evening, all proofed bills are input into a legacy typesetting system ● The typesetting staff opens the mainframe and Word Perfect versions of the bill ● Comparing the printed flagged bill, the workers electronically cut and paste changes into the legacy typesetting system DAY 1 - 22:00
  • 35. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 35 STEP 8 – Proofing ● Proofers confirm the galley text output from the legacy typesetting system agrees with the flagged bill DAY 2 - 02:00
  • 36. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 36 STEP 9 – Page Layout ● The galley text is paginated with tape on a layoff table to produce a composed page in the correct pagination sequence. ● In some instances, the typesetting output is sent directly to “plate” used in the printing process DAY 2 - 03:00
  • 37. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 37 STEP 10 – Print ● The typeset and composed bill is printed DAY 2 - 04:00
  • 38. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 38 STEP 11 – Folding & Hole Punched ● The printed bills are folding with a folding machine and 3 hole punched DAY 2 - 05:00
  • 39. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 39 STEP 12 – Binding & Stapling ● The printed bills are bound and stapled DAY 2 - 06:00
  • 40. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 40 STEP 13 – Packaged ● The printed bills are packaged for shipment back to the State House DAY 2 - 06:30
  • 41. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 41 STEP 14 – Shipped ● The printed bills are shipped back to the State House and collated / distributed in the document room DAY 2 - 07:00
  • 42. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 42 STEP 15 – Bill Jackets ● Staff assemble the bills into jackets and they are placed in the member's “in box” DAY 2 - 08:30
  • 43. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 43 STEP 16 – Member Distribution ● Staff “cart” bills for the session day to the floors of the House and Senate. They are placed in “Bill Books” and the old bills are thrown away DAY 2 - 00:00
  • 44. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 44 STEP 17 – Member Deliberation ● Members appear on the floor and begin deliberations on the new bills following the calendar of the day DAY 2 - 10:0
  • 45. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 45 Don Heiman and Alan Weis Strong Program Management
  • 46. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 46
  • 47. 47 1948 1958 1968 1978 1988 1998 2008 2018 2028 Manual Typewriter Electric Typewriter Memory Typewriter Word Processors PCs Word Processing LANS WANS Internet Email Groupware Handhelds Laptops Wireless Mobile Voice to Text Wearables Simulated Virtual Reality Virtual YouTechnology Adoption Curve Transformational Technology is the stuff you didn’t grow up with. Ken Orr Complexity
  • 48. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 48 What is KLISS? ● KLISS stands for Kansas Legislative Information Systems and Services ● KLISS was approved by the Kansas Legislative Coordinating Council in October 2004 ● The Council is the Legislative Leadership of the House and Senate ● KLISS implements unique vision of Kansas eDemocracy
  • 49. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 49 e-Government Vision Anything, including law making, you do in the presence of government you can do electronically without regards to walls or clocks, provided it is easy to use and it is free to citizens - KLISS Strategic Plan 2004 Includes archiving and authenticating electronic records produced from the KLISS time machine Anything you do presence Walls Clocks Easy to use Free integrated scales / reliable participative real-time / fast transparent auditable / accurate timeless self documenting No wrong door point & click open standards KLISS e-Democracy Vision E-democracy Vision
  • 50. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 50 What does KLISS produce? ● KLISS produces permanent and enduring records related to law making ● KLISS has an OAIS compliant archive for preserving permanent and enduring records in the original electronic form ● KLISS authenticates electronic law making records in the time machine built into KLISS for creating these records
  • 51. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 51 Why does KLISS use a time machine? ● For the purposes of determining legislative intent ● KLISS authenticates and preserves law making records in the full context of their creation ● The preservation is forever and it’s record authentication is done under statutory authority, KSA ??? ● The time machine produces an evolutionary record of the forces of how a bill becomes law ● This record can be used to interpret law
  • 52. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 52 How does a user experience KLISS? ● KLISS is built in XML and uses the principle of “no wrong door” ● KLISS integrates 21 subsystems across 3 service modules ● The modules include Law Making, Chamber Automation, and Decision Support ● From within any service module, a subsystem can be accessed by simply pointing and clicking. For example…
  • 53. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 53 How does a user experience KLISS? ● If a statute is referenced in the bill, the user clicks on the statute reference and obtains the statute while looking at the bill ● While looking at the statute, a user can click a button on the KLISS dashboard and view the fiscal note for the bill. ● The bill history resides on a bill page. A user can click on the bill page and view all hearing agendas related to the bill. The user can then click on an agenda topic and view the presentation materials, audio and video of the presenter, and see the video closed captioning.
  • 54. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 54 12 KLISS e-Democracy Features ● Statehouse is Virtual to State ● Allows for Full Integration ● Allows for Full Participation ● No Wrong Door Design (Easy and Intuitive) ● No stovepipes; no mainframe; open standards - Open data easily shared ● Paperless (Print on Demand)
  • 55. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 55 12 KLISS e-Democracy Features ● Very low cost – built on Open Source and Open Standards ● Minimize Reliance on State Printer ● IT Infrastructure and Application Follows Technology Trends ● Respectful of Capitol Restoration Vision - (Historic appropriate modern office building) ● IT Application and Infrastructure Easy to Maintain ● Satisfies national standards for authenticating and preserving electronic records of permanent and enduring value for the making of law.
  • 56. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 56 How does a user experience KLISS? ● Users can have a similar experience viewing Journals and Calendars ● Users can see supplemental notes to bills, bill explainers, formal messages between the House and Senate, vote records, and related information sources from any subsystem service module. ● Anytime any component changes, KLISS produces an active folder and all subsystems and services the exist at the moment of any change are placed in this new folder. In this way the bill is versioned and a complete audit trail exists as a permanent and enduring record.
  • 57. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 57 How does a user experience KLISS? ● The user simply points and clicks, no training required. ● The user can annotate any view of the bill and store the annotation in a personal folder. ● The user has at his or her fingertips the complete history of the bill for every version of the bill as the bill moves through the process of becoming law.
  • 58. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 58 KLISS Systems and Infrastructure
  • 59. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 59 KLISS Application Modules Integrated – No Wrong Door – Open Standards Law Making: ● Bill Drafting ● Bill Amendment ● Resolution Drafting ● Engrossing ● Statute Publication Chamber Automation: • Bill Status • Journals • Calendars • Enrolling • Messages Decision Support: • Committee Agenda, Minutes, & Testimony • Conference Committee • Supplemental Notes • Appropriations • Omnibus • Claims • Capital Improvements • Bill Explainer • Fiscal Reporting • Appointments • Interim Report
  • 60. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 60 Kansas Legislature IT Strategic plan ● In September of 2003 the Legislative Coordinating Council called for information services strategic plan. ● The legislative CITO, Don Heiman, working with all the division in the legislature produced the plan. ● The plan used Bob Benson and Tom Bugnitz new information economics methodology ● The plan identified 10 application development initiatives and 20 plus IT infrastructure projects to support the application initiatives. ● The final implementation plan occurs January 10, 2011 as Kansas begins it’s 150th legislative session.
  • 61. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 61 State of Kansas Project Management ● Controlled under Information Technology Executive Council (ITEC) policies ➔ Project plans are submitted to and approved by the branch Chief Information Technology Officer (CITO) ➔ Each project plan consist of the project description, fiscal year budgeting, 80 hour increment work breakdown schedule, work product identification, and a risk assessment. Also includes cost benefit, architectural, intellectual property, privacy, security, web accessibility, and electronic record retention statements. ➔ A copy of the each plan is submitted to the Joint Committee on Information Technology (JCIT) and filed with the Kansas Information Technology Office (KITO)
  • 62. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 62 State of Kansas Project Management ● Project Status Report ➔ Quarterly project status reports are required to be submitted to the branch CITO ➔ Copies of the status reports are submitted to JCIT and KITO ➔ Agency Project Managers at times are required to testify to JCIT on projects. ➔ Project Close-Out - Post Implementation Evaluation Reports (PIER)
  • 63. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 63 KLISS Software Application Project ➔ System Requirements ➔ Fit Analysis ➔ Detailed Design Specification ➔ Software Build ➔ Implementation Project Phases
  • 64. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 64 KLISS Software Application Project ➔ 7/1/2005 to 7/8/2006 - 12 Months ➔ 890+ Requirements ➔ 1,800 pages of documentation ➔ Bidding Process – ● 7 vendors with experience in the state legislature market space and with existing products were invited to compete in a bidding process and product demonstration. ● 2 vendors accepted and participated. ● Propylon, Inc. was selected as the winning bidder. System Requirements
  • 65. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 65 KLISS Software Application Project ➔ 5/15/2007 to 11/24/2008 - 18 Months ➔ 9/1/2006 to 2/28/2007 - 6 Months ➔ Vendor: Propylon, Inc ➔ Percentage of Propylon’s current product that meets our requirements with no modification ● Law Making – 67% ● Chamber Automation – 47% ● Decision Support – 44% ● General & Technical – 53% Fit Analysis
  • 66. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 66 KLISS Software Application Project ➔ 5/15/2007 to 11/24/2008 - 18 Months ➔ Vendor: Propylon, Inc ➔ 5200 pages of documentation ➔ Law Making – Completed November 2007 ➔ Chamber Automation – Completed April 2008 ➔ Decision Support – Completed September 2008 ➔ Technical Architecture – Completed October 2008 ➔ Project was completed on time and on budget ● November 24, 2008 Detailed Design Specification
  • 67. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 67 KLISS Project Build ➔ Thick client graphic user interface ➔ Subsystem for compiling, assembling, and testing. ➔ Template management ➔ Extensible metadata framework ➔ XML processing engine ➔ Asset aggregation framework ➔ Interzone communication framework for administration and security Core system build consisted of 12 subsystems
  • 68. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 68 KLISS Project Build ➔ CASE tools for managing folders and naming conventions ➔ Extensible word processor scripting framework ➔ Active MQ and messaging bus for event notification ➔ Assent versioning repository ➔ Time machine ➔ All 12 modules share the same Core system services Core system build consisted of 12 subsystems
  • 69. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 69 KLISS Project Build ➔ CASE tools for managing folders and naming conventions ➔ Law Making service modules (5) ➔ Chamber service modules (5) ➔ Decision Support service modules (11) ➔ Internal Legislative Interface ➔ External Legislative Interface Base system consists of 21 service modules
  • 70. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature Strategic Plan – LCC Approval KLISS Time line Oct 2004 July 2005 July 2006 Fit Analysis 6 Months Sept 2006 Feb 2007 System Bid – Awarded to Propylon, Inc. Dec 2005 May 2007 Nov 2008 Software Build Phase 1 – 30 Months Jan 2009 July 2011 Software Build Phase 2 – 12 Months May 2011 April 2012 System Requirements 12 Months Detailed Design 18 Months Law Making, Bill Status, Chamber Automation & Decision Support Phase 1 Implementation Jan 2011 Decision Support Phase 2 Implementation Jan 2012
  • 71. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 71 KLISS “Go Live” ● IT Implementation Staffing Plan ● User Training and Certification Program ● Kansas staff paring with Propylon ● Implement Public Facing External Legislative Interface ● Create a “War Room” – Support Structure ● Change and Release Management using COBIT standards ● ADA Compliant
  • 72. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 72 KLISS “Go Live” ● Implement a Security Council ● Implement Emergency Change Control Board ● Implement a performance success score card for the 2011 legislative session ● Implement a budget tracking system ● File a close out project management report ● Post Implementation Evaluation Report – PIER ● Final cost benefit / Lessons Learned
  • 73. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 73 KLISS Post Implementation ● Submit fiscal year 2013 budget ● Prepare 5 year strategic plan ➔ GEO code bills ➔ Redistricting system ➔ Constituent services system ➔ Build new vote management system for the House and Senate Chambers ➔ Decision Support Back Office Systems - Appropriations - Claims against the State
  • 74. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature Sean McGrath CTO KLISS Next Gen. Legislative Enterprise Architecture
  • 75. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 75 KLISS Law Making
  • 76. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 76 KLISS Law Making
  • 77. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 77 KLISS Law Making
  • 78. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 78 KLISS Law Making
  • 79. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 79 KLISS Chamber Interface
  • 80. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 80 KLISS Chamber Interface
  • 81. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 81 KLISS Chamber Interface
  • 82. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 82 KLISS Chamber Interface
  • 83. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 83 KLISS Legislative Interface
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  • 90. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 90 High Level Architecture
  • 91. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 91 High Level Architecture
  • 92. © 2010 Propylon / Cutter Consortium / Kansas State Legislature 92 ● Key points and take-aways from this presentation. ● Given what we’ve witnessed, in what ways will governments be transformed near term? ● Assume you could time-travel to the year 2020 today. What do you see in regards to e-Democracy and C2G interaction 10 years from now? ● Other observations? Summation with Ken Orr