Theory presentation kubler ross

7,682 views
7,294 views

Published on

presentation

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
7,682
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
39
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
156
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Theory presentation kubler ross

  1. 1. ELIZABETH KUBLER-ROSS THE FIVE STAGES OF GRIEF<br />BY JENNIFER BERTOLON & LAUREL MARTENS<br />
  2. 2. Credentialsand Background <br />1957—graduated from the University of Zürich medical school <br />1958—moved to New York to continue graduate studies<br />1962—accepted a position at the University of Colorado School of Medicine<br />1963—completed her training in psychiatry<br />1965—took appointment at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Medicine.<br />1969—published On Death and Dying, outlining the 5 stages of grief<br />
  3. 3. Influences/Motivation<br />Kubler-Ross was approached by four theological students <br />Students were assigned to write about "crisis in human life” <br />Selected death as "the biggest crisis people had to face" <br />She agreed to help them gain access to and interview some dying patients <br />Her book, On Death and Dying, is about these interviews<br />
  4. 4. Derivation of Theory<br />Reasoning from a specific case or cases to a general rule.<br />Kubler-Ross derived her theory from 200 patient interviews and applied to the broader population <br />So inductive reasoning is like when someone unfriends you on Facebook, but you know it’s because his girlfriend’s jealous, and it really means he wants to hook up. Or is that deductive reasoning?”<br />
  5. 5. Range/Type of Theory<br />Narrow<br />Conceptual Model <br />Stage theory<br />
  6. 6. Pros/Cons of TheKubler-Ross Model<br />Life experiences determine how one will progress through 5 stages<br />Useful tool, which assists in understanding how others may be processing change<br />Empirical research has provided no support for this model<br />Some individuals may not experience all five stages<br />The limitations of the method have not been acknowledged.<br />
  7. 7. Major Concepts/Definitions<br />Thanatology—the study of death and tying<br />from the greek word “thanatos” meaning death <br />Learning about imminent death and dying is a journey from denial to acceptance <br />
  8. 8. Five Stages of Grief<br />Denial<br />Anger<br />Bargaining<br />Depression<br />Acceptance<br />* Hope<br />
  9. 9. Accepted, but Questioned<br />Lack of published research<br />No explicit empirical base<br />The number of patients used was relatively low to base predictions upon <br />Overly broad theory formulation<br />Language of ‘stages’ is too restrictive and overly specific <br />
  10. 10. Practical Uses/Education<br />WHO???<br />Doctors<br />Nurses<br />Psychologists<br />Patients<br />Families<br />Social workers<br />HOW???<br />Easy to understand<br />Immediately applicable <br />
  11. 11. Critique of the Theory<br />Allows people to relate to one another<br />Validates feelings, and inclusive<br />Emotional behaviors as opposed to stages<br />Rigid pattern<br />Five stages are too simplistic<br />Cannot broadly apply it<br />
  12. 12. References<br />Connolley, M. (2011). Kubler-Ross five stage model. Retrieved April 12, 2011<br />Corr, C. A., & Corr, D. M. (n.d.). Stage theory. In Encyclopedia of Death and Dying. Retrieved April 11, 2011<br />Kelso, B. (2004, May 3). Five stages. Retrieved April 10, 2011<br />Kessler, D. (2011). Elisabeth Kübler-Ross. In grief.com. Retrieved April 11, 2011<br />Kubler-Ross, E. (1969). On death and dying What the dying have To teach doctors, nurses, clergy and their own families. MacMillan Publishing: New York.<br />Kübler-Ross, E. & Kessler, D. (2005). On grief and grieving: Finding the meaning of grief through the five stages of loss. New York: Scribner.<br />Levinger, G. (1976) A social psychological perspective on marital dissolution, Journal of Social Issues 32 (1), 21-47<br />Morrow, A. (2011). The DABDA theory of coping with death. In Palliative Care. Retrieved April 11, 2011<br />Perring, C. (2011). Death, dying and the quality of life. Retrieved April 11, 2011<br />

×