Come cline with me

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Come cline with me

  1. 1. Come Cline with Me Jonathan Ingham, IH Palermo
  2. 2. Clines in Language Teaching
  3. 3. The British Council Teaching English website defines a cline as: ‘a s _ _ _ _ of language i _ _ _ s that goes from one e _ _ _ _ _ _ to another. For example, from p _ _ _ _ _ _ _ to n _ _ _ _ _ _ _, or from w _ _ _ to s _ _ _ _ _’. What is a cline?
  4. 4. The British Council Teaching English website defines a cline as: ‘a s c a l e of language i t e m s that goes from one e x t r e m e to another. For example, from p o s i t i v e to n e g a t i v e, or from w e a k to s t r o n g’. What is a cline?
  5. 5. An example
  6. 6. An example
  7. 7. Why are clines useful? Conveying and clarifying language. A visual representation of meaning. Highlighting shades of meaning. They provide students with a good record of language to take home. They are efficient and can cut down on teacher talking time.
  8. 8. So what can we use them for? Vocabulary (Lexical items) Words Expressions Idiomatic phrases Grammar
  9. 9. Adjectives - temperature
  10. 10. Adjectives - temperature
  11. 11. Expressing likes and dislikes
  12. 12. Expressing likes and dislikes
  13. 13. Modals of deduction
  14. 14. Modals of deduction
  15. 15. Hungry?
  16. 16. Hungry?
  17. 17. An ideas for using clines in class. Draw the skeleton cline on the board. Give students the expressions on cards. Students stick them where they think they go on the cline (bluetack on back of cards). Students take a step back and work together to discuss and agree on the positioning. T clarifies and puts them in the correct place. Follow up practice.
  18. 18. Thank you!

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