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Alan Hatton-Yeo Ageing Well masterclass presentation
 

Alan Hatton-Yeo Ageing Well masterclass presentation

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Alan Hatton-Yeo is the Chief Executive of the Beth Johnson Foundation. This is his presentation to the Ageing Well Masterclass about the value of intergenerational working.

Alan Hatton-Yeo is the Chief Executive of the Beth Johnson Foundation. This is his presentation to the Ageing Well Masterclass about the value of intergenerational working.

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    Alan Hatton-Yeo Ageing Well masterclass presentation Alan Hatton-Yeo Ageing Well masterclass presentation Presentation Transcript

    • Maximising benefit for all, The value of intergenerational working
      • Intergenerational practice aims to bring people together in purposeful, mutually beneficial activities which promote greater understanding and respect between generations and contributes to building more cohesive communities.
      • Intergenerational practice is inclusive, building on the positive resources that the generations have to offer to each other and those around them
      • Has there ever been a golden age of community?
      • Cohesive communities in the past have often experienced:
        • Poverty
        • Disadvantage
        • Limited Social Mobility
        • National crisis
        • Inequality
      • Danger of mythologising the past:
        • 1880s The Shuttlers
        • 1950s Razor Boys and Teddy Boys
        • 1960s Mods and Rockers
        • 1970s Punks, Skinheads
        • 2040 ?
      • Conflict between the generations is part of our history.
      • Society has been experiencing increasingly rapid change since the industrial revolution
      • This has been:
          • Within the family
          • Within employment
          • Within technology
          • Within the media
          • Within transport
          • Within housing
          • Within personal expectations
      • Development of intergenerational programmes:
      • Initially related to concerns over growing distances between generations and increased negative age related stereotypes.
      • Then became focussed on mitigating problems affecting two ‘vulnerable’ groups in Society
      • Developed in to an agent of change to revitalise neighbourhoods and communities by (re)-connecting the generations and connecting service providers
      • Evidence suggests communities and neighbourhoods are becoming increasingly segmented and suspicious.
      • Isolation of Older People is increasing
      • Tolerance of the young is decreasing
      • The Media is becoming increasingly sensationalist
      • Globalisation has a strong hold on some of our core values
      • And people are reported as being:
        • More stressed
        • Less content
        • More anxious
        • More suspicious
        • More rushed
      • Main areas of current intergenerational work include:
        • Intergenerational volunteering
          • Mentoring
          • Skills sharing
          • Coaching
        • Community relationship building / community safety
        • Active ageing / health and well being
        • Support to individuals and families
      • Outcomes for older people include:
        • Increased motivation
        • Increased perception of self worth
        • Reduced social isolation
        • Improved motivation
        • Recognition of the skills they possess
        • Improved health and well being
      • Outcomes for children and young people include:
        • Increased self esteem and resilience
        • Access to adults at times of difficulty
        • Enhanced sense of social responsibility
        • Reduced involvement in offending and solvent abuse
        • Better health
        • Improved school attendance and attainment
      • Outcomes for the community include:
      • Improved community cohesion
      • Diversification of volunteering
      • Increased engagement
      • Increased social capital
      • Enhanced feeling of safety
      • Outcomes for Local Authorities include:
      • Framework for sharing resources
      • Improved Cross-departmental working
      • Multiple outcomes for different groups
      • Value for money
      • Extra tools to address some priorities
      • Current British Policy Drivers:
      • Strengthening the family and promoting the role of older kin
      • Generational relationships in the workplace
      • Health and well-being – Active Ageing across the life-course
      • Transitional retirement and the ‘habit’ of volunteering
      • Support to young people not in education, training or employment
      • Citizenship and community engagement
      • Multi-generational approaches to community cohesion
      • Building positive attitudes to the different generations
      • Integrated team working in Local Authorities with improved efficiency and better outcomes for more people
      • Age Friendly Communities
      • Sustainable change
      • Models include:
      • Derbyshire:
      • http://www.derbyshire.gov.uk/Social_health/adult_care_and_wellbeing/getting_out_and_involved/activities_services/helping_all_ages/default.asp
      • Manchester
      • http://www.manchester.gov.uk/generationstogether
      • Leeds
      • http://www.leedsinitiative.org/generations /
      • "No one is born a good citizen; no nation is born a democracy. Rather, both are processes that continue to evolve over a lifetime." -- Kofi Annan
      • www.centreforip.org.uk
      • [email_address]