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5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014
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5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014

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Welcome to the 5th UM-NUS-CU Trilateral Mini Symposium and Scientific Meeting 2014!! We are especially proud to be given the opportunity to organize this symposium in the Department of Chemistry, UM …

Welcome to the 5th UM-NUS-CU Trilateral Mini Symposium and Scientific Meeting 2014!! We are especially proud to be given the opportunity to organize this symposium in the Department of Chemistry, UM this year.
Since the initiation of this symposium in 2009 in Bangkok, Thailand, we have strived both to focus and broaden the scope of the symposium. The focus has been to establish collaborative research and networking among the academics from the top research universities in Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand.
This year, the symposium is held on the 11th and 12th February 2014. The program on the first day of the event is packed with oral presentations by 12 distinguished speakers from the three univeristies. As before, the symposium is structured to allow close interaction among the participants; hence together with the formal presentations, there will be social occasions such as dinner at Eastin Hotel, where the academics and attendees will get together and know each other better to enhance opportunities for scientific intercourse. Besides, we have also arranged a short tour for our guests to Rimba Ilmu, which means Forest of Knowledge in the malay language. Rimba Ilmu is a tropical botanical garden, set up in the University of Malaya campus in Kuala Lumpur. It is modelled after a rain forest garden concept rather than a formal flower garden. It emphasises the flora of the Asean region with living collections of over 1,600 species. The Rimba Ilmu also houses the University of Malaya herbarium (acronym KLU) and has its own Environmental Education Programme.
An administrative or annual meeting between the three institutes has also been arranged and it will be held on the second day of this event to discuss matters associated to research student exchange, collaboration, MoU, etc. With all these programs in line, I greatly hope that we can make full use of our time and resources in the next two days to discuss and deliberate on research issues, and at the same time paving the way towards a more sustainable and resilient research collaborations.

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  • 1. 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page1 5th UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 PROGRAMME AND ABSTRACTS DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY, FACULTY OF SCIENCE, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, 50603 KUALA LUMPUR
  • 2. Welcome 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page2 Table of Contents Page Welcome note 3 Organizing committee 5 Delegation from Chulalongkorn University 6 Delegation from National University of Singapore 7 Scientific programme 8 Abstracts of invited speakers 11 Abstracts of poster presentations 24 Sponsors 114
  • 3. Welcome 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page3 Welcome note Prof. Dr. Mhd. Radzi Abas Welcome to the 5th UM-NUS-CU Trilateral Mini Symposium and Scientific Meeting 2014!! We are especially proud to be given the opportunity to organize this symposium in the Department of Chemistry, UM this year. Since the initiation of this symposium in 2009 in Bangkok, Thailand, we have strived both to focus and broaden the scope of the symposium. The focus has been to establish collaborative research and networking among the academics from the top research universities in Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand. This year, the symposium is held on the 11th and 12th February 2014. The program on the first day of the event is packed with oral presentations by 12 distinguished speakers from the three univeristies. As before, the symposium is structured to allow close interaction among the participants; hence together with the formal presentations, there will be social occasions such as dinner at Eastin Hotel, where the academics and attendees will get together and know each other better to enhance opportunities for scientific intercourse. Besides, we have also arranged a short tour for our guests to Rimba Ilmu, which means Forest of Knowledge in the malay language. Rimba Ilmu is a tropical botanical garden, set up in the University of Malaya campus in Kuala Lumpur. It is modelled after a rain forest garden concept rather than a formal flower garden. It emphasises the flora of the Asean region with living collections of over 1,600 species. The Rimba Ilmu also houses the University of Malaya herbarium (acronym KLU) and has its own Environmental Education Programme. An administrative or annual meeting between the three institutes has also been arranged and it will be held on the second day of this event to discuss matters associated to research student exchange, collaboration, MoU, etc. With all these programs in line, I greatly hope that we can make full use of our time and resources in the next two days to discuss and deliberate on research issues, and at the same time paving the way towards a more sustainable and resilient research collaborations.
  • 4. Welcome 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page4 To our friends from Singapore and Thailand, the Department of Chemistry, UM welcomes you, encourages you to visit and stay with us and hope that this trilateral seminar will bond us even more strongly for our mutual benefit. I hope you will enjoy yourself in the sympossium and have a wonderful time!! Prof. Dr. Mhd. Radzi Abas, Chairman of the Organizing Committee, 5th UM-NUS-CU Trilateral Mini Symposium 2014 Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya.
  • 5. Organisers 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page5 Members of Organising Committee Patron : Prof. Dato’ Dr. Mohd. Sofian Azirun Dean, Faculty of Science, Univeristy of Malaya Advisor : Prof. Dr. Sharifuddin Md. Zain Chairman : Prof. Dr. Mhd. Radzi Abas Secretary : Dr. Cheng Sit Foon Treasurer : Dr. Teo Yin Yin Liason officer : Dr. Cheng Sit Foon (UM – NUS) Assoc. Prof. Dr. Vannajan Sanghiran Lee (UM – CU) Members (i) Dr. Desmond Ang Teck Chye (ii) Dr. Low Kah Hin (iii) Dr. Noraini Ahmad (iv) Dr. Siti Nadiah Abdul Halim (v) En. Mohd. Azli Ishak (vi) En. Hashim Mohammad Salleh (vii) En. Norafandi Tamar (viii) En. Nor Mazni bin Jahari (ix) En. Saifulrullah Abd. Rahim (x) En. Yusriadie Mohd. Azmi (xi) Pn. Norhaida Mohd. Nor (xii) Pn. Norzainariah bt. Mat Zaid (xiii) Pn. Siti Alimah Makmon (xiv) Pn. Zailawati Mohamad Zakaria
  • 6. CU Delegates 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page6 Honorable Delegation from Chulalongkorn University Assoc. Prof. Dr. Vudhichai Parasuk Assoc. Prof. Dr. Paitoon Rashatasakhon Assist. Prof. Dr. Worawan Bhantumnavin Prof. Dr. Orawon Chailapakul Assist. Prof. Dr. Sumrit Wacharasindhu Dr. Numpon Insin Assist. Prof. Dr. Viwat Vchirawongwin Assist. Prof. Dr. Fuangfa Unob Dr. Puttaruksa Varanusupakul Dr. Rojrit Rojanathanes Dr. Pannee Leeladee Assist. Prof. Dr. Soamwadee Chaianansutcharit Dr. Kanet Wongravee Dr. Prompong Pienpinijtham
  • 7. NUS Delegates 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page7 Honorable Delegation from National University of Singapore Prof. Dr. Chang Young Tae Assoc. Prof. Dr. Valiyaveettil Suresh Assoc. Prof. Dr. Kang Hway Chuan Assoc. Prof. Dr. Chen Wei
  • 8. Programme 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page8 Scientific Programme Day 1 - 11th February 2014 Activity : Oral and poster presentations Venue : D112 (Oral) and Dataran Kimia (Poster) 8.30 – 9.30 a.m. Registration 9.30 a.m. Opening ceremony 9.30 – 9.45 a.m. Welcoming remarks and Briefing Prof. Dr. Sharifuddin Md. Zain Head, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, Malaysia 9.45 – 10.00 a.m. Speech and Briefing Prof. Dr. Chang Young Tae Head of Delegation, National University of Singapore 10.00 – 10.15 a.m. Speech and Briefing Assoc. Prof. Dr. Vudhichai Parasuk Head, Department of Chemistry, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand 10.15 – 10.30 a.m. Welcoming and Opening Speech Prof. Dato’ Dr. Mohd. Sofian Azirun Dean, Faculty of Science, University Malaya 10.30 – 10.40 a.m. Group photography session All delegates 10.40 – 11.00 a.m. Coffee break and poster presentation Venue: Dataran Kimia 11.00 a.m. Session 1 Chairperson : Prof. Dr. Chang Young Tae 11.00 –11.20 a.m. Speaker 1 Prof. Dr. Rauzah Hashim (UM) Guerbet Glycoside: The New Lipid in Town 11.20 – 11.40 a.m. Speaker 2 Assoc. Prof. Dr. Chen Wei (NUS) Atomic-Scale Interface Controlled Two-Dimensional Molecular Dipole Dot Arrays 11.40 – 12.00 p.m. Speaker 3 Prof. Dr. Orawon Chailapakul (CU) The Novel Electrochemical Systems For Environmental And Clinical Applications 12.00 – 12.20 p.m. Speaker 4 UM Prof. Dr. Khalijah Awang (UM) Bioactive Phytochemicals From The Malaysian Flora And
  • 9. Programme 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page9 Medicinal Plants 12.20 – 12.40 p.m. Speaker 5 Assoc. Prof. Dr. Kang Hway Chuan (NUS) Conductance And Electronic Structure Across Graphene Nanoribbon Junctions 12.40 – 1.00 p.m. Speaker 6 Assist. Prof. Dr. Sumrit Wacharasindhu (CU) Direct Synthesis of Acetylenic Compounds from Calcium Carbide: a New Sustainable Chemical Feedstock 1.00 – 2.00 p.m. Lunch Venue: Multipurpose room Poster presentation Venue: Dataran Kimia 2.00 p.m. Session 2 Chairperson: Assoc. Prof. Dr. Paitoon Rashatasakhon 2.00 – 2.20 p.m. Speaker 7 Dr. Sharifah Mohamad (UM) Application of β-cyclodextrin Functionalized With Ionic Liquid For Extraction And Separation Of Organic Compounds 2.20 – 2.40 p.m. Speaker 8 Assoc. Prof. Dr. Valiyaveettil Suresh (NUS) Understanding The Environmental Impact And Developing A Remediation Method For Nanopollutants 2.40 – 3.00 p.m. Speaker 9 Dr. Numpon Insin (CU) Surface Modifications and Environmental Applications of Magnetic Nanoparticles and Quantum Dots 3.00 – 3.20 p.m. Speaker 10 Dr. Woi Pei Meng (UM) Development of Non-Enzymatic Portable Body Metabolites Sensor 3.20 - 3.40 p.m. Speaker 11 Prof. Dr. Chang Young Tae (NUS) Caffeine Sensor and Bioimaging Probe Development 3.40 – 4.00 p.m. Speaker 12 Assist. Prof. Dr. Viwat Vchirawongwin (CU) Evaluations of Vibration Spectra from Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Hydrated Sulfoxy Anions 4.00 p.m. End of mini sympossium Light refreshment Venue: Dataran Kimia 8.00 p.m. Dinner at Eastin Hotel (by invitation)
  • 10. Programme 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page10 Day 2 – 12th February 2014 Activity : Scientific meeting and discussion Venue : Rimba Ilmu and K017 8.30 – 9.45 a.m. Rimba Ilmu tour 9.45 –12.15 noon Discussion on academic staff exchange programme Discussion on student exchange programme for undergraduates and postgraduates Venue: K017 12.15 – 12.30 p.m. Closing ceremony 12.30 p.m. Lunch Venue: Multipurpose room
  • 11. Abstract - Speakers 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page11 ABSTRACTS OF ORAL PRESENTATIONS (Content unedited)
  • 12. Abstract - Speakers 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page12 Guerbet Glycoside: The New Lipid in Town Rauzah Hashim Chemistry Department, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia *Email: rauzah@um.edu.my Abstract Here, we discuss some results from the study of self-assembly phenomena on a special class of poly-hydroxy sugar surfactant, the branched chain Guerbet glycoside (BCGG). Surfactants from this class of material are also classified as amphitropic liquid crystals since they exhibit both thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystalline properties. Hence the potential applications of these non-ionic surfactants are far wider than the conventional lyotropic liquid crystals encompassing both areas of high-technology industry and life science. From uniting the approaches in experiment, theory and computation, we have developed some basic understanding of the phase behavior. In turn, the self-assembly property may be manipulated using external factors to give rise many innovative ideas. This review covers the effect of stereochemical diversity of the sugar on the thermotropic/lyotropic phases formed. The structure to property relationship compares different chain designs and other popular polyhydroxy compounds, such as monooleins and alkylpolyglucosides. The structural advantages of these Guerbet glycosides due to large chain hydrophobicity, tunable, chiral, asymmetric and stable ether linking group are discussed with respect to their self-assembly organization and potential applications, such as drug delivery, protein crystallization and membrane mimetic study. Keywords: Glycolipid, Guerbet Glycoside, Lyotropic, Non-ionic surfactant Speaker 1
  • 13. Abstract - Speakers 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page13 Atomic-Scale Interface Controlled Two-Dimensional Molecular Dipole Dot Arrays Wei CHEN1,2* 1 Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore, 117543 2 Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore, 117542 *E-mail: chmcw@nus.edu.sg Abstract Creation of well-ordered functional molecular arrays at the nanometer scale is one of the key issues in the development for future molecular- or nano-electronic devices, solid-state quantum computation, single-electron devices, and biosensors. Molecular self-assembly on surfaces or surface nanotemplates via selective and directional covalent or non-covalent interactions offers a promising bottom-up approach to fabricating molecular nanostructure arrays with desired functionalities over macroscopic areas. The directionality and selectivity of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, metal-ligand interactions as well as covalent bonding can facilitate the formation of ordered supramolecular assemblies with good structural stability. In this talk, we highlight our recent progress in the fabrication of self-assembled molecular nanostructures on surface and surface nanotemplates, as investigated by in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy, with particular emphasis on the fabrication of 2D molecular dipole dot arrays, as well as the reversible switching of individual dipole molecule in hydrogen-bonded 2D networks. Keywords: Single Molecule, STM, Self-Assembly Speaker 2
  • 14. Abstract - Speakers 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page14 The novel electrochemical systems for environmental and clinical applications Orawon Chailapakul1,* , Thara Nurak1 , Narong Praphairaksit1 , Nipapan Ruecha2 , Nadnudda Rodthongkum3 , Ratthapol Rangkupan3 1 Electrochemistry and Optical Spectroscopy Research Unit (EOSRU), Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University,10330, Thailand 2 Program in Macromolecular Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, 10330, Thailand 3 Metallurgy and Materials Science Research Institute, Chulalongkorn University, 10330, Thailand *Email: corawon@chula.ac.th Abstract Our research topic focuses on a development of new electrochemical systems for the detection of elemental species and biomakers of interest for the environmental and clinical applications. The first project, we report a spraying method with lacquer developed for a novel fabrication of paper-based devices. The paper-based devices were used to determine nickel using anodic stripping voltammetry. Cu-enhancer solution was employed to increase sensitivity of nickel determination with the optimal concentration of 4.5 ppm. Under the optimal conditions, linear range was found to be in the range of 1 to 50 ppm with a coefficient of determination of 0.9971. The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) were found to be 0.5 and 1.97 ppm, respectively. Moreover, these paper-based electrochemical devices were applied to determine nickel in waste water from a jewelry factory. The second project, graphene-polymer nanodroplets are developed and used to modify paper-based electrode for electrochemical detection of cholesterol. Nanodroplets of Graphene-polymer were fabricated using electrospraying technique to increase the electrode surface. The modified electrode was characterized for morphology and electroactivity by using scanning electron microscope and cyclic voltammetry. This proposed method has been used to detect cholesterol using chronoamperometry. Keywords: Electrochemical sensor, Anodic stripping voltammetry, Amperometry, heavy metal, biomarker Speaker 3
  • 15. Abstract - Speakers 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page15 Bioactive Phytochemicals from the Malaysian flora and medicinal plants Khalijah Awang Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur Abstract Since the dawn of civilisation, plants have been used as medicine and until today there are still the main source for therapeutic agents especially the anti cancer drugs such as taxol and the indole alkaloids vinblastine and vincristine. Malaysia is the home to one of the oldest and most diverse flora in the world. It is the host of more than 15,000 plant species. Therefore, the Malaysian flora is an excellent resource for bioactive and rare phytochemicals that could be potential candidates for drug development. In view of the these factors, our laboratory is focussing our research on bioactive natural products. Our findings on phytochemicals from various plant species shall be presented. Examples of bioactive compounds possessing complex skeletons from plant families such as Annonaceae, Apocynaceae, Meliaceae, Guttifereae shall be presented. In addition, Malaysia is also rich with its traditional medicine heritage from three different cultures: Malay, Chinese and Indian. Findings from the traditional medicinal plants studied in our laboratory shall also be discussed briefly.Since the dawn of civilisation, plants have been used as medicine and until today there are still the main source for therapeutic agents especially the anti cancer drugs such as taxol and the indole alkaloids vinblastine and vincristine. Malaysia is the home to one of the oldest and most diverse flora in the world. It is the host of more than 15,000 plant species. Therefore, the Malaysian flora is an excellent resource for bioactive and rare phytochemicals that could be potential candidates for drug development. In view of the these factors, our laboratory is focussing our research on bioactive natural products. Our findings on phytochemicals from various plant species shall be presented. Examples of bioactive compounds possessing complex skeletons from plant families such as Annonaceae, Apocynaceae, Meliaceae, Guttifereae shall be presented. In addition, Malaysia is also rich with its traditional medicine heritage from three different cultures: Malay, Chinese and Indian. Findings from the traditional medicinal plants studied in our laboratory shall also be discussed briefly. Speaker 4
  • 16. Abstract - Speakers 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page16 Conductance and electronic structure across graphene nanoribbon junctions Kang Hway Chuan Department of Chemistry, NUS Division of Science, Yale-NUS College Abstract The antiferromagnetic electronic structure of zig-zag graphene nanoribbons is well-known, leading to possible spin-polarized electron transport with a transverse electric field. We explore an alternative way of achieving spin-polarized electron transport through a junction consisting of zig-zag graphene nanoribbon leads and a small molecular link such as polyenes and cumulenes. We will present our results discuss the effects on conductance of the adsorption position for the linker molecule, edge decoration and relative rotations of the graphene-nanoribbon leads. Speaker 5
  • 17. Abstract - Speakers 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page17 Direct Synthesis of Acetylenic Compounds from Calcium Carbide: a New Sustainable Chemical Feedstock Sumrit Wacharasindhu, Padon Chuentragool, Nopparat Thavornsin, Narongpol Kaewchangwad and Mongkol Sukwattanasinitt Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 *Email: sumrit.w@chula.ac.th Abstract Acetylenic compounds are important building blocks for natural products, pharmaceuticals and molecular materials. At the start of our research program, we explored one of well-known acetylenenic derivatives: polydiacetylene (PDA) in sensor application. The success of these works led to the development of point of care colorimetric sensors for detecting temperature anionic surfactants and volatile organic compounds. To promote wider adoption of PDA-based materials, we aim to develop a more cost efficient and safer method to synthesize acetylenic derivatives in the second part of our project. In this presentation, we demonstrated the use of calcium carbide, which is a low price primary feedstock from heavy chemical industry for the synthesis of acetylenic compounds such as diarylethynes, poly- phenyleneethylene and arylpyroles in one step fashion. The processes provide high yields of acetylenic derivatives in comparable or better yield than conventional methods. It is also less complicate and cheaper to carry out. The optimization and scope of the reaction will be discussed in this presentation. Keywords: Sonogashira, acetylene, conjugated polymer and calcium carbide Speaker 6
  • 18. Abstract - Speakers 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page18 Application of β-cyclodextrin functionalized with ionic liquid for extraction and separation of organic compounds. Sharifah Mohamad*, Mhd Radzi Abas, Nor Kartini Abu Bakar, Tay Kheng Soo, Nur Nadhirah binti Mohamad Zain, Muggundha Raoov a/L Ramachandran, Tay Kheng Soo Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia *Email: sharifahm@um.edu.my Abstract The growing interest in cyclodextrin (CD) and ionic liquid (IL) in separation study, has allowed us to combine these two domains of research to apply in extraction and separation of organic compounds. In the first part of the presentation, I will focus on how the combination of properties offered by both domains may be combined usefully for extraction and separation of organic compounds. Cyclodextrin offer hydrophobic in nature can entrap different kinds of compounds including organic, inorganic, organometallic and metaloorganic, while ionic liquids offer unique properties such as negligible volatility, thermal stability, and non- flammability make them acceptable as new green solvents. Owing to the properties of cylcodextrin and ionic liquid, the functionalization of β-CD with IL has fostered our interest in preparing a new generation of material that may demonstrate some interesting phenomena in extraction and separation studies. In this paper, synthesize and characterization of β- cyclodextrin functionalized with ionic liquid (β-CD-IL) will be presented and the application of (β-CD-IL) in extraction and separation of organic compounds will be discussed. Keywords: Cyclodextrin, Ionic Liquid, Extraction, Separation Speaker 7
  • 19. Abstract - Speakers 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page19 Understanding the environmental impact and developing a remediation method for nanopollutants Suresh Valiyaveettil Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore, 117543. E-mail: chmsv@nus.edu.sg Abstract Nanoscience and nanotechnologies are expected to revolutionize our life in the coming years. Engineered nanomaterials are already present in many consumer products such as cosmetics, biomedical materials, detergents, antimicrobial paints, surface modifiers, food additives and packaging materials, to name a few. Such increased usage of nanomaterials has caused concerns from various quarters of our society, including government organizations and public in general. The main reason for such concern involves the lack of our knowledge on the fate of such nanomaterials inside the living organism. Recent studies have shown that metallic nanoparticles are toxic to living systems. We have been examining such adverse impact of nanomaterials in human cell lines and zebrafish models. On the other hand, if the environments are contaminated with nanomaterials, there must be efficient materials and methods to remove such pollutants from environment, especially potable water. Recently, we tried to develop new renewable adsorbents for water purification. The current presentation will give full details on environmental impact of nanomaterials and also look a t the future remediation of contaminated environment. Keywords: Nanotoxicity, zebrafish, metal nanoparticles, Water purification Acknowledgement: The authors thank the Environment and Water Industry Programme Office (EWI) under the National Research Foundation of Singapore (PUBPP 21100/36/2, NUS WBS no. R-706-002-013-290, R-143-000-458-750, R-143-000-458-731) for the financial support of the work. The authors also thank Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, NUS Environmental Research Institute (NERI) for funding and technical support. Speaker 8
  • 20. Abstract - Speakers 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page20 Surface Modifications and Environmental Applications of Magnetic Nanoparticles and Quantum Dots Numpon Insin Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University Email: Numpon.i@chula.ac.th Abstract Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are two classes of inorganic nanomaterials with unique properties. MNPs exhibit superparamagnetism, the phenomenon of nanoscale ferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic materials that can stay colloidal stable with strong response in presence of magnetic fields. QDs are known for their intense and tunable fluorescence with broad range of excitation wavelength. In this presentation, we will discuss about various surface modification processes that have been studied in our lab in order to use these nanomaterials to solve and prevent some environmental problems. Pollutants such as oil, heavy metals, and organic dyes were removed from water by superparamagnetic sorbents. Moreover, QDs were used to monitor the level of some heavy metals in waste water. From these studies, we found that these nanomaterials, after undergone suitable surface modification processes, show their potential to be used in many applications efficiently. Keywords: Magnetic nanoparticles, superparamagnetic, quantum dots, fluorescent, pollutants Speaker 9
  • 21. Abstract - Speakers 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page21 Development of Non-Enzymatic Portable Body Metabolites Sensor Pei Meng Woi,1,* Ahmad Nazmi bin Rosli,1,2 , Yatimah Alias1 and Mohd Rais Ahmad2 1 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Lembah Pantai, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 2 NEMS & Photonics Laboratory, MIMOS Berhad, Technology Park Malaysia, 57000 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. *E-mail: pmwoi@um.edu.my Abstract Our research relates to prototype construction of molecular sensing devices of bio-chemical nanosensors for bio-medical and health applications. This nanosensor can be used to monitor health conditions by monitoring binding affinity of the metabolites thus possessing recognitive ability geared towards ionic metabolites such as potassium, sodium, ammonium, hydrogen ions, chloride, phosphate and carbonate of medical interest [1,2] . Similarly, biomolecule recognising substituents are of importance for glucose and living body fluid such as blood and uric acid determination. Our nanosensors can be used to monitor health conditions by monitoring the calcium and magnesium level, with preferable selectivity towards calcium. This prototype which is an integrated miniaturised sensor array along with readout circuitry and microcontroller on the same platform provides fast and accurate measurement of the targeting analytes via potentiometric method. The prototype we have here is based on nano-electrodes which are fabricated using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method, through selective deposition, nano-lithography and etching. Alternatively, carbonised polymeric poles, carbon nano-tubes and graphenes can be grown to function as electrodes [3] . This is an added advantage compared to other available sensors on the market in terms of lifetime/reliability, accuracy, mobility, cost and manufactured ability. Keywords: Bio-chemical nanosensor, portable detection kit, USB terminal, functionalized monomer Suggested Reading: 1. Apodaca, D.C.; Pernites, R.B.; Ponnapati, R.R.; Del Mundo, F.R.; Advincula, R.C. ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 2011 3(2), 191-203. 2. Workman, J.; Lavine, B.; Chrisman, R.; Koch, M. Anal. Chem., 2011, 83(12), 4557-4578. 3. Nayagam, D.A.X.; Williams, R.A.; Irwin, J.; Tan, J.; Innis, P.; Leung, R.T.; Finch, S.; Williams, C.E.; Clark, G.M.; Wallace, G.G. Small 2011, 7 (8), 1035. Speaker 10
  • 22. Abstract - Speakers 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page22 Caffeine Sensor and Bioimaging Probe Development Young-Tae Chang National University of Singapore Department of Chemistry *Email: chmcyt@nus.edu.sg Abstract The conventional bioprobe design has been carried out by so-called hypothesis-driven approach. The basic assumption of hypothesis-driven approach is that the scientist “knows the target” in advance, and then design the recognition motif for it. An alternative approach is diversity-driven approach, in which a broad range of fluorescence molecules in a library format are constructed by combinatorial chemistry, as a tool box for unbiased screening. Among several diversity sources, “Diversity Oriented Fluorescence Library Approach (DOFLA)” using fluorophore core with diverse recognition motives around has been the most fruitful in novel bioprobe generations. Using DOFLA, various sensors including caffeine orange, and also colorful bioimaing probes from stem cells to Neurons will be demonstrated. Keywords: Fluorescence, Sensor, Bioimaging, Probe Speaker 11
  • 23. Abstract - Speakers 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page23 Evaluations of Vibration Spectra from Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Hydrated Sulfoxy Anions Viwat Vchirawongwin Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Road, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand *Email: Viwat.V@Chula.ac.th Abstract The sulfoxy anions consist of sulfur and oxygen atoms utilized in ubiquitous chemical processes, resulting contamination in freshwater environments as evidence of water pollution and in atmospheric aerosol particles. The aqueous solutions of sulfate, bisulfate, sulfonate and thiosulfate anions were simulated by the ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) formalism. The evaluation of vibration spectra from the trajectory of simulations is a challenge to verify the dynamics property comparison with the experimental data. This process uses the normal vector analysis on the molecular solute and the velocity autocorrelation function (VACF) coupling with Fourier transformation, converting the MD results into the power spectra. This evaluation provided the positions and patterns of calculated spectra in very good agreements with available IR and Raman data, which can confirm the appropriation of the selected theoretical level in the simulation protocol to acquire the properties of these hydrated anions. Keywords: Molecular Dynamics, Sulfoxy anion, Velocity autocorrelation function, Vibration spectra Speaker 12
  • 24. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page24 ABSTRACTS OF POSTER PRESENTATION (CONTENT UNEDITED)
  • 25. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page25 Index Abstracts of Posters Section Author Title Designation Inorganic Chemistry Fadhil Lafta Faraj, Hapipah Mohd Ali, Hamid Khaledi and Noraini Ahmad A meso-substituted β- dialdiminate-bis(phenolate) ligand in Mn III , Co III , Co II ,, Ni II and Cu II complexes INORG 1 Nurul Azimah Ikmal Hisham, Hamid Khaledi, and Hapipah Mohd Ali Di- and trinuclear metal complexes derived from pyrazolylindolenine INORG 2 Ainnul Hamidah Syahadah Azizan, Nurfarhanim Abu Bakar, Teh Kai Ni, Gwaram Nura Suleiman, Hapipah Mohd Ali and Hamid Khaledi Reduction of carbon-carbon double bonds of Chalcone using phenylsulfonyl hydrazide INORG 3 Mok Piew Heng, Kong Wai Tan, Seik Weng Ng, Yoke Kqueen Cheah, Sabrina Sukardi Synthesis and characterization of nickel (II) complex bearing a Schiff base with a testosterone moiety and its biological properties INORG 4 Farhatun Najat Maluin, Sharifah Mohamad, Ninie S. A. Manan Ionic Liquid as the morphology template for polyaniline/ nano-hematite composite INORG 5 Subathra Sinniah, Sharifah Mohamad, Ninie S.A. Manan Synthesis and Characterization of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles Coated with β- CD-IL INORG 6 Norbani Abdullah and Noha Said A. Bedowr Single-molecule magnet and magnetic coordination polymers with mesogenic properties INORG 7 Abeer Abduljaleel Ibrahim, Hapipah Mohd Ali, Hamid Khaledi Spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic studies on Pd +2 and Pt +2 complexes of flexidentate Schiff base ligand derived from indole-7- thiosemicarbazone and their anticancer activity INORG 8 Shin Thung Chew, Kong Mun Lo and Kong Wai Tan Synthesis, Structural Characterization And Biological Properties Of Copper Complexes With Ligands Containing Phosphonium Substituents INORG 9 Sze Koon Lee, Kong Wai Tan, Hoi Ling Seng Zinc (II) Complex Bearing A Cationic Schiff Base With A Bromomethyl Group: INORG 10
  • 26. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page26 Synthesis, Spectroscopic Characterizations And Biological Study On E.Coli Topoisomerase I Activity Hana Bashir Shawish, Mohd Jamil Maah Synthesis and Characterization of Nickel complexes - New Insights into the Structure and Bonding of Thiourea Diamine Derivatives INORG11 Ishak, D. H. A., Ooi, K. K., Ang, K. P., Akim, A. M., Cheah, Y. K., Nordin, N., Halim, S. N. A., Seng, H. L. & Tiekink, E. R. T.1 A bismuth diethyldithiocarbamate compound promotes apoptosis in HepG2 carcinoma, cell cycle arrest and inhibits cell invasion through modulation of the NF-κB activation pathway INORG12 Kit May Chow and Kong Mun Lo Organometallic Chemistry INORG13 Pannee Leeladee, Guy N. L. Jameson, Maxime Siegler and David Goldberg A High-Valent Iron Imido Corrolazine: Generation and Evidence of NR Group Transfer INORG14 Richard C.S. Wong and Mei Lee Ooi Isolation And Characterisation Of Novel Organometallic Derivatives Of Multidentate Phosphine Bis[(o- methylthio)phenyl]phenylpho sphine and Tris[(o- methylthio)phenyl]phosphine INORG15 Wang Chunyan and Suresh Valiyaveettil Study of cytotoxic effects of green synthesized silver nanoparticles with different capping agents on tumor cells INORG16 Aina Mardia Akhmad Aznan, A. P. Safwan, Zanariah Abdullah, Trupta Kaulgud, Hadi D. Arman, Matthew Mahindaratne, Laurie E. McNeil, and Edward R. T. Tiekink Supramolecular metathesis: cation exchange in salts derived from the sulfa-drug, sulfathiazole INORG17
  • 27. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page27 Section Author Title Designation Organic / Natural products Nur Atiqah Mohd Nasuha and Yeun-Mun Choo Dyes From Natural Resources ORG 1 Katrina Mohamad Khidzir, Sit Foon Cheng and Cheng Hock Chuah Volatile Components of Fresh Jasminum sambac Buds and the Potential Antioxidant Activities of its Methanolic Extract ORG 2 Chun Hui Ang, Sit Foon Cheng, Chavasiri Warinthorn and Cheng Hock Chuah Antioxidant Potential of Tannin-rich n-Butanol Extract from Elaeis guineensis Leaf ORG 3 Wei Seng Ng, Sit Foon Cheng, Choy Sin Lee and Cheng Hock Chuah Synthesis of Palm Oil-Based Polyester Polyols ORG 4 Wai-Ming Kok, Sit-Foon Cheng and Cheng-Hock Chuah Long Chain Saturated Structured Lipids via Enzymatic Interesterification using Lipase Rhizomucor miehei (Lipozyme RM IM) ORG 5 Lim Jun Lee, Gan Chew Yan, Low Yun Yee, Lim Siew Huah and Kam Toh Seok Alkaloid from Alstonia rostrata ORG 6 Rojrit Rojanathanes, Kobkun Saepang, Supakit Seawpakorn, Patchanita Thamyongkit, and Wittawat Keawsongsang Pyridine-Based Molecular Pincer for Transition Metal Complexation ORG 7 Shah Bakhtiar Nasir and Noorsaadah Abd Rahman Aza Diels-Alder Rection of Cyclic Imine with Danishefsky’s Diene ORG 8 Chun Keng Thy, Chin Fei Chee and Noorsaadah Abd Rahman Total Synthesis of (±)- Cyclollicinone ORG 9 Jia Ti Tee, Chin Fei Chee and Noorsaadah Abd Rahman Total synthesis of (+)- Morusalbanol A and (+)- Sorocein B ORG 10 Nurul Izzatil Aisya Asri, Issha Nadirah Ismail, Hairul Anuar Tajuddin, and Zanariah Abdullah Preparation and Fluorescence Behaviour Of Coumarin Terminated Monolayer On Silver Particle ORG11 Mohd Helmi Hussaini Dullah, Zanariah Abdullah, Hairul Anuar Tajuddin Synthesis and Fluorescence Characterization Of Azo- Coumarin And Azo-Naphthol ORG12 Issha Nadirah Ismail, Nurul Izzatil Aisya Asri, Hairul Anuar Tajuddin, and Zanariah Abdullah. Alkyl Disulfide as an Alternative Absorbate for Monolayer Formation on Silver Particles ORG13
  • 28. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page28 Section Author Title Designation Physical / Polymer / Composites / Material chemistry Nirosa Raman, Kavirajaa Pandian Sambasevam and Phang Sook Wai Comparison studies of polyaniline nanocomposite with & without TiO2 for hydrazine detection PHY 1 Misni Misran, Teo Yin Yin, Woo Juin Onn, Vicit Rizal Eh Suk, and Yew Han Choi Fatty acid nanoparticle for topical and oral delivery applications PHY 2 T. H. Ali, R. S. D. Hussen and T. Heidelberg Y-shaped Carbohydrate Surfactants by ‘Click Chemistry’ for Oil-in-Water Emulsions PHY 3 Nurshafiza Shahabudin, Rosiyah Yahya and Seng Neon Gan Preparation of microcapsules containing alkyd resin as core PHY 4 M.S. Nusari and A. Mainal Adsorption of Methylene blue onto Chitosan-Based Activated Carbon: Isotherm and Kinetic Studies PHY 5 Vannajan Sanghiran Lee, Vertika Gautam, Wei Lim Chong, Sharifuddin M. Zain, Noorsaadah Abd. Rahman Hot-Spot Motif Characterization of Interface between a Designed Ankyrin- Repeat Protein and Its Target Kinase PHY 6 Pedram Azari, Haris Akram, Gan Seng Neon, Rosiyah Yahya, Wong Chiow San, Belinda-Pingguan Murphy An in vitro biological evaluation of electrospun poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and bovine hydroxyapatite composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering PHY 7 Pameswari Subramani,Yeong Siang Chiam, Seng Neon Gan, Sook Wai Phang Synthesis, Characterization And Application Of Polyaniline (PAni) Optical Sensor For pH Detection PHY 8 Zahrabatoul Mosapour Kotena, Reza Behjatmanesh–Ardakani, Rauzah Hashim Hydrogen bonds formation in α/β-D-mannose and n-octyl- α/β-D-mannopyranoside using AIM and NBO analyses PHY 9 Abbas Abdulameer Salman and Thorsten Heidelberg Bio-Functionalization of Inorganic Nanoparticles PHY 10 Vannajan Sanghiran Lee, Kanchanok Kodchakorn, Jitrayut Jitonnom, Piyarat Nimmanpipug, Prachya Kongtawelert, Bhusana Premanode, Wei Lim Chong, Sharifuddin M. Zain, Noorsaadah Abd. Rahman Exploration on the Role of Metal Cofactors and Water on the Catalytic Mechanism of Creatininase-Creatinine in Aqueous Solution from Molecular Dynamics Simulation/Quantum Study PHY11 Shabnam Bakhshaei, Sharifah Mohamad, Sharifuddin Md Zain Synthesis and characterization of of new sol–gel titanium(IV) butoxide– cyanopropyltriethoxysilane in cooperated with imidazolium- based ionic liquids PHY12 Naimah Haron, Nor Asrina Sairi, Mohamed Kheireddine Aroua, Yatimah Alias Effect of Water Concentration on the Structural and Diffusion Properties of PHY13
  • 29. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page29 Guanidinium Trifluoromethanesulfonate Ionic Liquid− Mixture Nor Asrina Sairi, Mohd Azlan Kassim, Rozita Yusoff, Mohamed Kheireddine Taieb Aroua CO2 Capture in Ionic Liquid: A review on mixed solvent systems PHY14 Zati Ismah Ishak, Nor Asrina Sairi, Yatimah Alias, Mohamed Kheireddine Taieb Aroua Transesterification reaction: Facile reaction by ionic liquids as catalyst – A review PHY15 Wan Melissa Diyana Wan Normazlan, Vijaya Ranganathan, Usman Ali Rana, Nor Asrina Sairi, Yatimah Alias and Douglas MacFarlane The Role of Hydrogen Bonding by New Protic Ionic Liquids in Driving Phase Separation or Phase Miscibility in UCST Ternary Mixtures. PHY16 Prompong Pienpinijtham, Xiao Xia Han, Sanong Ekgasit, and Yukihiro Ozaki A Fabrication of Surface- Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Substrate Using an Ionic Surfactant-Mediated Langmuir-Blodgett Method PHY17 Supamas Kanjanakunthon, Nipaka Sukpirom and Puttaruksa Varanusupakul Electrospun Titanium Dioxide Fibers as Stationary Phase in Thin Layer Chromatography PHY18 Anucha Koedtruad, Koichiro Mitsuke and Soamwadee Chaianansutcharit Effects of Sintering Temperature on Conductivity and Oxygen Permeation of La0.3Sr0.7Co0.9Fe0.1O3 Perovskite PHY19 Norazlinaliza Salim, Rauzah Hashim and Noraini Ahmad Formation of Branched-Chain Glycolipids Nano-Emulsions for Topical Drug Delivery Systems PHY20 Faheem Ahmed Qaid, Abdul Hamid bin Yahaya and Rosiyah binti Yahya Kinetic and isotherm adsorption of phenol from wastewater using activated carbons prepared from jatropha seed husks by KOH activation PHY21 Yee Ting Chong, Norazilawati Muhamad Sarih, Sie Tiong Ha, Rezaul Karim Sheikh Synthesis and Mesomorphic Properties of Schiff’s Base Ester with Terminal Methoxy Substituent PHY22 Olla .H.Sharhan, Abdul Hamid Yahaya and Mohamed Mahmoud Nasef Preparation and characterization of poly (3- hydroxybutyric acid)/poly(vinyl acetate) thin films PHY23 Sung-Jin Park, Nam-Young Kang, Anandhkumar Raju, Xiao Wei Emmiline Ang, Animesh Samanta, Seong- Wook Yun and Young-Tae Chang Development of in vivo Inflammation Imaging Probes PHY24 Nam-Young Kang, Sung-Chan Lee, Sung-Jin Park, Seong- Development of in vivo imaging probes for PHY25
  • 30. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page30 Wook Yun, and Young-Tae Chang pancreatic islets by Diversity Oriented Fluorescence Library Approach (DOFLA) Young-Tae Chang and Seong- Wook Yun Fluorescent chemical imaging probes for live stem cells PHY26 Animesh Samanta,Kaustabh Kumar Maiti, U. S. Dinish and Young-Tae Chang Near-Infrared Raman Reporters for SERS-based in vivo Cancer detection PHY27 Wan Hamdah Wan Ahmad Effect Of Pure Cationic Micelle ([Ctabr]T On The Rate Of Alkaline Hydrolysis Of N- (2-Aminophenyl)Phthalimide PHY28 Norazizah A. Razak, Nor Saadah M. Yusof and M. Niyaz Khan Quantitative Correlation Between Counterion (X) Affinity to Cationic Micelles and X-Induced Micellar Growth for X = 2,6- Dichlorobenzoate Ions PHY29 Ashok Keerthi, Yeru Liu, Qing Wang, Suresh Valiyaveettil Multidonor Substituted Perylene Dyes through Unusual Bromination of Perylene Monoimide PHY30 Perakassh veloo, Yen Nee Koh, Sook Wai Phang Morphology Studies of Doped Polyaniline Nanocomposites Containing TiO2 Nanoparticles and Graphene Nanoplatelets PHY31 Muhammad Adil Mansoor, Muhammad Mazhar and Zainudin Artfin. Development of Photosensitive Ceramic Thin Films for Photovoltaic Applications PHY32
  • 31. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page31 Section Author Title Designation Analytical / Environmental Adam Henry Sivapatham, Nadiya Taha Darwish, Mai Mai Khoo and Sook Mei Khor Development of a Reusable Biosensor for Small Molecules AN-EV 1 Mehwish Jamil Noor, Muhammad Aqeel Ashraf, Mushtaq Ahmad,Amber latif, Sonia Fatima Identification and Evaluation of Air Pollution Tolerance Index of Plant Species under the Impacts of Marble Industry Pollutants of AN-EV 2 Rizwana Naureen, Imran Hashmi, Mohd, Jamil Maah, Ismail Yusoff, Muhammad Aqeel Ashraf Biodegradation Studies of Dichlorvos under Different Sets of Conditions AN-EV 3 Shiau Yi Tan and Kah Hin Low Prediction of cetirizine hydrochloride content in medication tablet using ATR- FTIR and PLS AN-EV 4 Mehrnaz Ashrafi, Sharifah Mohamad, Ismail Yusoff, Fauziah Shahul Hamid Remediation of Heavy Metal Contaminated Soil Using Banana Stem as the Organic Fixing Additive AN-EV 5 Fathiah Zubaidi, Guan Huat Tan, Choo Yeun Mun Development and Validation of Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometer (LCMSMS) for the Simultaneous Determination of Common Drugs of Abuse in Forensic Cases in Malaysia: Application to Dried Blood Stain (DBS) AN-EV 6 Ummi Noor Salhah Masseren, Tay K.S, Abas M.R.B Preliminary Result On Screening Of Pharmaceuticals In Hospital Sungai Buloh Wastewater Treatment Plant AN-EV 7 Jarinya Sittiwong, Fuangfa Unob Detection of creatinine in urine samples by gold nanoparticles AN-EV 8 Kanet Wongravee, Tewalak Parnklang, Yukihiro Ozaki, Chuchaat Thammacharoen, Sanong Ekgasit Chemometric Analysis of Spectroscopic Data on Shape Evolution of Silver Nanoparticles Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide AN-EV 9 H.H. Mohammad, Khalisanni Khalid, Kheng Soo Tay, Sharifuddin Md. Zain, Rashid Atta Khan The Influence of Triton-X on the Evaporation Rate of Methanol- An analysis using Reversed-Flow Gas Chromatography (RF-GC) Methodologies AN-EV 10 Ramakrishna Mallampati, Ong Pin Jin, Suresh Valiyaveettil Efficient removal of engineered nanoparticles from water using renewable resources AN-EV11
  • 32. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page32 Section Author Title Designation UM Undergraduate poster Final Year Project and Internship Mak Oi Wei, Maheswari D/O Paliyanny Multi-residue Analysis of β- Agonists in Tissues by LC- MS/MS UP 1 Ong Pei Pei and Dr. Ng Mei Han Extraction Of Phytonutrients From Crude Palm Oil And Red Palm Oil Using Ionic Liquid UP 2 Su-Han Ng and Toh-Seok Kam Alkaloids from Alstonia sp. UP 3 Sim-Yee Cha, Bonnie Yen- Ping Tay, and Pei-Meng Woi Analysis of Compound P, A By-Product of Palm-Based Ester Using HPLC-MWD UP 4
  • 33. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page33 A meso-substituted β-dialdiminate-bis(phenolate) ligand in Mn III , Co III , Co II , Ni II and Cu II complexes Fadhil Lafta Faraj*, Hapipah Mohd Ali, Hamid Khaledi and Noraini Ahmad Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia E-mail: fadhil_960@yahoo.com Abstract Copper, nickel, manganese and cobalt complexes have been synthesized from a new ligand derived from condensation reaction of 2-aminophenol and 2-(3,3-dimethylindolin-2-ylidene) malonaldehyde. The structures of ligand and complexes were characterized by FT-IR, UV– Vis, TGA, 1 H and 13 C-NMR spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements, elemental analysis and X-ray crystallographic analysis. Keywords: 2-(3,3-dimethylindolin-2-ylidene) malonaldehyde, 2-aminophenol, complexes INORG 1
  • 34. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page34 Di- and trinuclear metal complexes derived from pyrazolylindolenine Nurul Azimah Ikmal Hisham*, Hamid Khaledi, and Hapipah Mohd Ali. 1 Department of Chemistry University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia *Email: nurulaziemahikmal@gmail.com Abstract Reactions of the 2,3,3-trimethylindolenine with Vilsmeier reagent (DMF/POCl3) produced aminomethylene-malonaldehyde which reacted with hydrazine to obtain the corresponding pyrazolylindolenine. The heterocycle was used in the synthesis of a series of di- and trinuclear metal complexes. The structures were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and magnetic susceptibility. Keywords: Dinuclear, Trinuclear, Metal complexes, Pyrazolylindolenine Suggested Reading : 1. R. M. Aghdam, M. M. Baradarani & A. Afghan, Curr. Chem. Lett. 2 (2013) 13. 2. J.E. Cosgriff, G.B. Deacon, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 37 (1998) 286. 3. O. Kahn, Molecular Magnetism, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 1993. INORG 2
  • 35. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page35 Reduction of carbon-carbon double bonds of Chalcone using phenylsulfonyl hydrazide Ainnul Hamidah Syahadah Azizan*, Nurfarhanim Abu Bakar, Teh Kai Ni, Gwaram Nura Suleiman, Hapipah Mohd Ali and Hamid Khaledi Department of chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya. *Email: nura_suleiman@yahoo.com Abstract The reactions of substituted chalcones with phenylsulfonyl hydrazide in ethanol resulted in the reduction of the carbon-carbon double bond of the chalcones. While in the presence of sodium acetate, the reactions gave the corresponding ketones as the sole product, in acidic conditions, along with the ketones, sulfones were generated. The reactions were also carried out in solvent-free conditions were the ketones were obtained as the sole-products. The products were all characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopy and also X-ray crystallographic analysis. Keywords: Chalcones, Phenylsulfonyl hydrazide, carbon-carbon reduction Suggested Reading: 1. Smit C., Fraaije M.W. and Minnaard A. J. (2008). Reduction of Carbon−Carbon Double Bonds Using Organocatalytically Generated Diimide, J. Org. Chem., 73, 9482–9485 2. Li, J.P.; Zhang, Y.X.; Ji, Y. (2008). Selective 1,4-reduction of chalcones with Zn/NH4Cl/C2H5OH/ H2O. J. Chin. Chem. Soc., 55, 390–393. INORG 3
  • 36. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page36 Synthesis and characterization of nickel (II) complex bearing a Schiff base with a testosterone moiety and its biological properties Mok Piew Heng1,2 , Kong Wai Tan2 , Seik Weng Ng2 , Yoke Kqueen Cheah1 , Sabrina Sukardi1 1 Department of Biomedical Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Malaysia 2 Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Email: mokpiew@gmail.com Abstract A Schiff base ligand L was prepared by refluxing equimolar amount of testosterone and thiosemicarbazide in boiling ethanol with continuous stirring for 6 hours. Crystal of L was obtained from slow evaporation ethanol at room temperature. Its nickel (II) complex 1 were synthesized and precipitated upon addition of nickel acetate into ethanolic solution of L. Complex 1 was recrystallized from mixture of DMF:methanol (3:8). These compounds sythesized were characterized by using FTIR, CHN, 1 H-NMR, and X-ray crystallography. These spectroscopic methods confirmed the formation of L from condensation of testosterone and thiosemicarbazide. Besides, X-ray study also proved that complex 1 is in a slightly distorted square planar environment. L acts as a bidentate OS-donor ligand, whereby a mononuclear complex 1 is coordinated to 2 L via 2 imine nitrogens and 2 tautomeric thiol sulfurs. The inhibitory effects of L and 1 on E. coli topoisomerase I were evaluated by agarose gel electrophoresis. However, both compounds failed to inhibit topoisomerase I even at high compound concentration (500 µM). The DNA binding ability of these compounds were determined by UV-vis spectroscopy and the intrinsic binding constants (Kb) for the interaction of the compounds with calf thymus DNA were determined by employing Wolfe-Shimmer equation. Complexation with nickel dramatically increased the binding ability. Keywords: Testosterone, Thiosemicarbazide, Nickel, Schiff base, DNA binding INORG 4
  • 37. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page37 Ionic Liquid as the morphology template for polyaniline/ nano-hematite composite Farhatun Najat Maluin*, Sharifah Mohamad, Ninie S. A. Manan Department of Chemistry, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur. *Email: farha.naj@siswa.um.edu.my Abstract The synthesis and morphology of polyaniline/hematite(α-Fe2O3) was explored using an imidazolidium base ionic liquids (ILs). A series of ILs with different length of alkyl chain with several types of anions (Cl, BF4, PF6 and NTf2) have been tested. A direct chemical synthesis of polyaniline-ferric oxide was prepared via interface polymerization. This polymerization occurs between the layer of ionic liquid and immiscible solvent. The reactions were simple and fast as the green thin layer of polyaniline in the interface can be observed immediately. The composite were subjected to the structural characterization by Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and UV spectroscopy. The FT-IR result confirmed the formation of polyaniline in the composite while the XRD result confirmed the presence of hematite in the composite. The morphology of the nanocomposites was confirmed with Field Emission Scanning Microscopy (FESEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The size, shape and distribution of nanoparticle of hematite loading in nanocomposite of polyaniline-ferric oxide were determined. In addition, the magnetic susceptibility of polyaniline/nano-hematite composite has been investigated by using Guoy balance magnetometer. Keywords: Ionic Liquid, Polyaniline, nano-hematite INORG 5
  • 38. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page38 Synthesis and Characterization of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles Coated with β-CD-IL Subathra Sinniah*, Sharifah Mohamad, Ninie S.A. Manan Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia *Email: suba_28@yahoo.com Abstract Beta Cyclodextrin-Ionic liquid (β-CD-IL) coated with iron oxide nanoparticles (FeNPs) were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. The structure and morphology of prepared complex was characterized using X Ray Diffaction (XRD), Tramission Electron Microscope (TEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). The results of analysis confirmed the proposed complex as the product. The FESEM showed β-CD-IL-FeNPs have mean diameter (between 10 to 30nm). Keywords: Beta Cyclodextrin, Ionic liquid, Fe3O4 Nanoparticles INORG 6
  • 39. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page39 Single-molecule magnet and magnetic coordination polymers with mesogenic properties Norbani Abdullah and Noha Said A. Bedowr* Chemistry Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia *Email: e.m.t.p1432@gmail.com Abstract Single molecule magnets and magnetic coordination polymers are examples of advanced low- dimensional materials, especially for spintronic applications. They may be constructed from copper(II) ion and ditopic ligands, such as 2,2’-bipyridine and 4,4’-bipyridine. This paper reports the synthesis and characterization of a single molecule magnet, [Cu2(ɳ2 -(OOCR)2(ɳ1 -(OOCR)2(2,2'-bpy)].H2O (1), and a coordination polymer, {[Cu2(ɳ2 -(OOCR)2(ɳ1 -(OOCR)2(2,2'-bpy)(4,4'-bpy)].H2O}n (2), where R = CH3(CH2)14. These complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopies, magnetic susceptibility, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and optical polarized microscopy (OPM). Both complexes showed weak antiferromagnetic interactions between the square pyramidal Cu(II) centres, and exhibit mesomorphisms. Keywords: Cu(II), Single molecule magnet, Coordination polymer, Magnetic, Mesomorphism INORG 7
  • 40. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page40 Spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic studies on Pd+2 and Pt+2 complexes of flexidentate Schiff base ligand derived from indole-7- thiosemicarbazone and their anticancer activity Abeer Abduljaleel Ibrahim* , Hapipah Mohd Ali, Hamid Khaledi Chemistry Department, Faculty of science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia *Email : marwa2002@siswa.um.edu.my Abstract A new indolyl-imine ligand was synthesized by the condensation reaction of indole-7- carbaldehyde with thiosemicabazide . This ligand was reacted with Pd+2 and Pt+2 . The chemical structures and purities of the complexes were evaluated by 1 HNMR and X-ray crystalloghraphy. In the palladium complex, the Schiff base molecule acts as a tridantate- N,N,S ligand to chelate the metal center via its indole and azomethine nitrogens and thiolate sulfur atoms to afford a complex of the type 2:1 (ligand/metal ratio) in square planner coordination geometry. Also,the Schiff base coordinates Pt+2 ion as a tridentate ligand via N,N,S atoms to form a complex of the type 1:1(ligand/metal) in square planner geometry. Anticancer activity of the ligand and its complexes are investigated in vitro assay. Suggested Pathway: Keywords: Thiosemicarbazone, Platinum complex, Palladium complex, Crystal structure, Anticancer assay INORG 8
  • 41. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page41 Synthesis, Structural Characterization And Biological Properties Of Copper Complexes With Ligands Containing Phosphonium Substituents Shin Thung Chew*, Kong Mun Lo and Kong Wai Tan Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia * E-mail: shinthung@live.com.my Abstract The interaction between anticancer drugs and nucleic acids has attracted much attention in molecular pharmacology, pharmaceutical chemistry and biological chemistry. It is commonly believed that DNA is one of the main target of many antitumor agents. In this connection, a series of copper complexes containing phosphonium substituted hydrazones was synthesized and further reacted with diamine ligands. All the compounds were characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods (FT-IR, NMR and UV-Vis) and in the case of crystalline products by X-ray crystallography. In addition, the DNA binding and nucleolytic properties of these Schiff base complexes were evaluated by using spectroscopic methods and gel electrophoresis. The topoisomerase I inhibition was also carried out in an attempt to investigate the ability of complexes to inhibit the topoisomerase I enzyme. Keywords: Hydrazones, DNA binding, topoisomerase I inhibitor, copper complexes INORG 9
  • 42. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page42 Zinc (II) Complex Bearing A Cationic Schiff Base With A Bromomethyl Group: Synthesis, Spectroscopic Characterizations And Biological Study On E.Coli Topoisomerase I Activity Sze Koon Lee, Kong Wai Tan, Hoi Ling Seng Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Email: Louiskoon@gmail.com Abstract A new cationic schiff base (STB) was synthesized by refluxing (3-Formyl-4-hydroxybenzyl) triphenylphosphonium chloride with 2-bromoethylamine.HBr. The ligand treated with zinc acetate salts in 1:1 molar ratios afforded the new metal complex, ZnSTB. Schiff base and its zinc complex formation have been confirmed by using IR, NMR, CHN and x-ray diffraction analysis. STB can be dissolved in most of the polar solvent, whereas ZnSTB only dissolve in DMF and DMSO. X-ray diffraction study shows that ZnSTB is four coordinated and the coordination geometry around zinc (II) is tetrahedral. Two bromine atoms are attached to the central zinc in cis-position and the singly deprotonated STB acts as an ON-donor ligand. The inhibition effect of STB and ZnSTB on E.coli topoisomerase I have been evaluated by gel electrophoresis. Results show that the inhibitory effect of STB is further enhanced upon complexation with zinc. Figure 1: Structure of STB INORG 10
  • 43. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page43 Figure 2: Structure of ZnSTB Figure 3: Effect of various concentrations of STB on the inhibition of E.coli topoisomerase I activity Figure 4: Effect of various concentrations of ZnSTB on the inhibition of E.coli topoisomerase I activity Keywords: Zinc, cationic, schiff base, triphenylphosphine, topoisomerase
  • 44. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page44 Synthesis and Characterization of Nickel complexes - New Insights into the Structure and Bonding of Thiourea Diamine Derivatives Hana Bashir Shawish*, Mohd Jamil Maah Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia * Email: shawishhana@yahoo.com Abstract Three series of nickel(II) complexes with thiourea ligands have been synthesized. Complexes of the formula [Ni(RNHCSNHRR̀ )2] and [Ni2(RNHCSNHRR̀ )2(NN)2]X where R= phenyl, R̀ = o-phenylamine, p-phenylamine and o-aminopyridine, NN= N,N bidentate ligand, X= NO3 - ; Cl- , have been characterized by elemental analysis, UV-Vis, IR, NMR spectroscopic studies as well as single crystal X-ray diffraction. Thiourea diamine ligands have been coordinated to nickel(II) and the differing binding modes of the ligands in the absence and presence of co- ligands have been investigated. The crystal structures of the complexes show that the reaction of thiourea ligands with nickel(II) salts yields mononuclear diamagnetic complexes with thiourea ligand coordinates as bidentate NS donors, while the reaction of nickel salts with the thiourea ligands in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline or 2,2-bipyridine affords binuclear paramagnetic complexes with the thiourea ligands coordinate as tridentate NNS donors. The ligands and their nickel complexes were subjected to test their DNA topoisomerase I inhibition efficiency. Keywords: Nickel(II) complexes, Thiourea, Diamine Derivatives, Binuclear complexes, DNA Topoisomerase I INORG 11
  • 45. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page45 A bismuth diethyldithiocarbamate compound promotes apoptosis in HepG2 carcinoma, cell cycle arrest and inhibits cell invasion through modulation of the NF-κB activation pathway Ishak, D. H. A.1 , Ooi, K. K.2 , Ang, K. P.2 , Akim, A. M.2* , Cheah, Y. K.2 , Nordin, N.3 , Halim, S. N. A.1 , Seng, H. L.1 & Tiekink, E. R. T.1** 1 Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 2 Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University Putra Malaysia, 43400, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia. 3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University Putra Malaysia, 43400, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia. *Email: abdah@upm.edu.my **Email: Edward.Tiekink@um.edu.my Abstract The compound with R = CH2CH3 in Bi(S2CNR2)3 (1) is highly cytotoxic against a range of human carcinoma, whereas that with R = CH2CH2OH (2) is considerably less so. Both 1 and 2 induce apoptosis in HepG2 cells with some evidence for necrosis induced by 2. Based on DNA fragmentation, caspase activities and human apoptosis PCR-array analysis, both the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis have been shown to occur. While both compounds activate mitochondrial and FAS apoptotic pathways, compound 1 was also found to induce another death receptor-dependent pathway by induction of CD40, CD40L and TNF- R1 (p55). Further, 1 highly expressed DAPK1, a tumour suppressor, with concomitant down- regulation of XIAP and NF-κB. Cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases correlates with the inhibition of the growth of HepG2 cells. The cell invasion rate of 2 is 10-fold higher than that of 1, a finding correlated with the down-regulation of survivin and XIAP expression by 1. Compounds 1 and 2 interact with DNA through different binding motifs with 1 interacting with AT- or TA-specific sites followed by inhibition of restriction enzyme digestion; 2 did not interfere with any of the studied restriction enzymes. Keywords: Bismuth, Apoptosis, Metallopharmaceuticals, Cell cycle, NF-κB INORG 12
  • 46. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page46 Organometallic Chemistry Kit May Chow* and Kong Mun Lo University Malaya, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Kuala Lumpur, 50603, Malaysia. *Email: kitmaychow@siswa.um.edu.my Abstract Organotin(IV) complexes have received considerable attention because of their biological properties, particularly antitumor, antibacterial and antifungal activity. An important class of organotin(IV) complexes with potential biological activities are those derived from ligands containing nitrogen and oxygen donor atoms. The easily accessibility and structural features made them the target of numerous biological and catalytic studies. New diorganotin(IV) and monoorganotin(IV) complexes have been synthesized from the reaction of the corresponding diorganotin(IV) dichloride or diorganotin(IV) dibromide with tridentate ligands such as (E)- 4-chloro-N’-(2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzylidene)benzohydrazide and (E)-4-chloro-N’-(3,5- dichloro-2-hydroxybenzylidene)benzohydrazide in methanol. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR and NMR (1 H and 13 C) spectroscopic studies, and their molecular structures have been confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Keywords: Organotin Compounds (OTCs), Mononuclear organotin(IV) complexes, Crystal structure INORG 13
  • 47. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page47 A High-Valent Iron Imido Corrolazine: Generation and Evidence of NR Group Transfer Pannee Leeladee1,3 , Guy N. L. Jameson2 , Maxime Siegler1 and David Goldberg1, * 1 Department of Chemistry, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, 21218, USA 2 Department of Chemistry and MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand Present Address: 3 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand *Email: pannee.l@chula.ac.th Abstract Iron-nitrogen multiply bonded compounds have been postulated as key intermediates in biological transformation (e.g. dinitrogen reduction in nitrogenase) and industrial processes (e.g. Haber-Bosch process). However, synthesis and characterization of such species remains challenging. Herein, generation of a new high-valent Fe-imido corrolazine complex is reported. Reaction of FeIII (TBP8Cz) (TBP8Cz = octakis(4-tert-butylphenyl)corrolazinato) and commercially available chloramine-T afforded a new species assigned as [FeIV (TBP8Cz+• )(NTs)] (Ts = 4-toluenesulfonyl) at room temperature. This new compound was characterized by UV-vis, EPR (X-band (15 K), g = 2.10, 2.00) and Mössbauer ( = -0.05 mm s-1 , EQ = -2.95 mm s-1 ) spectroscopies. [FeIV (TBP8Cz+• )(NTs)] was shown to perform stoichiometric and catalytic NTs transfer to triphenylphosphine (PPh3) giving the phospharane product, Ph3P=NTs, monitored by 31 P-NMR. Kinetic data were also consistent with the proposed NTs transfer mechanism. The reaction mixture of FeIII (TBP8Cz) + chloramine-T + PPh3 gave two new Fe corrolazine compounds i.e. [FeIV (TBP8Cz)(NPPh3)] and [FeIII (TBP8Cz)(OPPh3)], which were determined by X-ray crystallography. Full characterization of the [FeIII (TBP8Cz)(OPPh3)] structure was obtained by independently preparing the compound from FeIII (TBP8Cz) and OPPh3. This pure [FeIII (TBP8Cz)(OPPh3)] offers a benchmark for spectroscopic study on FeIII corrolazine in a structurally defined compound. INORG 14
  • 48. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page48 Isolation And Characterisation Of Novel Organometallic Derivatives Of Multidentate Phosphine Bis[(o-methylthio)phenyl]phenylphosphine and Tris[(o-methylthio)phenyl]phosphine Richard C.S. Wong* and Mei Lee Ooi Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia *E-mail: richard@um.edu.my Abstract Multidentate phosphine ligands containing thiolaryl groups have been in the limelight in recent years because of its lability towards soft metal complexes via its σ-donor and π- acceptor properties. Phosphine complexes are common in a variety of catalytic reactions, and the ability to control cis/trans isomerism via attractive interactions opens up possibilities for controlling the mechanisms of homogeneous catalytic reactions. In this work, we report the reactivity of bis(o-methylthiophenyl)phenylphosphine and tris(o- methylthiophenyl)phenylphosphine, acting as bidentate, tridentate and tetradentate ligands, respectively. Herein, we reported the syntheses and isolation of 8 novel complexes which were fully characterized by 1 H, 13 C and 31 P NMR, I.R. spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray crystallography. Keywords: multidentate, thioaryl, lability, synthesis, isolation. INORG 15
  • 49. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page49 Study of cytotoxic effects of green synthesized silver nanoparticles with different capping agents on tumor cells Wang Chunyan and Suresh Valiyaveettil* Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, 3 Science Drive 3, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543 Abstract Metal nanoparticles (NPs) have been found in a wide range of commercially available consumer products ranging from cosmetics to household detergents. This is especially true for silver (Ag) NPs, which showed antimicrobial effects. Recently, various green approaches have been used for preparing Ag NPs, as they may reduce or eliminate the toxic effects towards the environment and ultimately to human being. In our study, we explore preparation of Ag NPs using ginger, coffee and mint extracts at room temperature. The as-synthesized nanostructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and UV spectroscopy. The toxicity of Ag NPs with respective capping agents was studied using human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2). Furthermore, the level of toxicity was evaluated using changes in cell morphology, cell viability and oxidative stress. Toxicity of Ag NPs is dependent on both concentration and chemical nature of capping agents. Ag-mint NPs induced significant toxicity as competed to the other three NPs, with a viability of only 30% at a concentration of 25 µg/ml. The poster will discuss the synthesis, characterization and toxicity studies of AgNPs in detail. Acknowledgement: The authors acknowledge the support from Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore for funding and technical support. WC thanks the National University for a graduate scholarship. INORG 16
  • 50. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page50 Supramolecular metathesis: cation exchange in salts derived from the sulfa- drug, sulfathiazole Aina Mardia Akhmad Aznan,a A. P. Safwan,a Zanariah Abdullah,a Trupta Kaulgud,b Hadi D. Arman,b Matthew Mahindaratne,b Laurie E. McNeil,c and Edward R. T. Tiekink*a a Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. b Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78249-0698, USA c Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255, USA *E-mail: Edward.Tiekink@gmail.com; Fax: +60 3 79674204; Tel: +60 3 7967 6775 Abstract Co-crystallisation of equimolar quantities of sulfathiazole (STL) with each of 1,4- diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) and piperazine (PIP) lead to the facile formation of salts [DABCOH][STL_H] (1) and [PIPH][STL_H] (2), respectively. Crystallography shows the formation of aniline-N–H...O(sulfonyl) hydrogen bonds between anions to form undulating and zig-zag layers, respectively, with the cations being connected to these by charge-assisted N–H...N(thioazole) interactions. The salts were also investigated by 1 H NMR, IR and Raman spectroscopies as well as by DSC. Solid-state grinding competition experiments were monitored by PXRD. When 2 was ground with an equimolar amount of DABCO, substitution of the PIPH+ cation by DABCOH+ was proven, i.e. supramolecular metathesis had occurred, an observation correlated with the more efficient crystal packing observed in 1 cf. 2. INORG 17
  • 51. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page51 Dyes From Natural Resources Nur Atiqah Mohd Nasuha* and Yeun-Mun Choo Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia *Email: atiqah_nasuha@siswa.um.edu.my Abstract Roots of Morinda citrifolia (Mengkudu, Engkudu, or Noni) have been used traditionally by Iban community from Sarawak, Malaysia as a natural dye to produce yellow-orange shades. M. citrifolia is known to have a broad range of therapeutic effects due to its antioxidant activities. These include antiviral, antibacterial, anticancer activities as well as analgesics effects. In the present study, the chemical components were separated using various chromatographic methods. The structures were established by spectroscopic methods, particularly 2D NMR and MS. Keywords: Morinda citrifolia; Anthraquinones; Antioxidants ORG 1
  • 52. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page52 Volatile Components of Fresh Jasminum sambac Buds and the Potential Antioxidant Activities of its Methanolic Extract Katrina Mohamad Khidzir, *Sit Foon Cheng and Cheng Hock Chuah. Unit of Research on Lipids, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya,50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. * E-mail: sfcheng@um.edu.my Abstract We report on the volatile components of the methanolic extract from the fresh buds of Jasminum sambac which is categorized under the olive family, Oleaceae. A headspace solid - phase micro extraction (HS-SPME) method was utilized for profiling the volatile compounds released from fresh buds of Jasminum sambac. A 100 µm polydimethylsiloxane fibre was used to absorb and desorb the volatile compounds from the equilibrium headspace generated by the fresh buds. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with the HS-SPME was employed for the confirmation of identity and quantification of volatiles extracted. Volatile components found include farnesene, linalool, cadiene and muurolene. The antioxidant properties of the methanolic extract at different concentrations (50, 100, 250, 500 and 1000 ppm) were then examined by estimating the capability to scavenge DPPH free radicals. It was interestingly found that the methanolic extract has an IC50 value of 208.33 µg/mL compared to Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) which is 13.67 µg/mL. Keywords: Jasminum sambac, buds, solid phase micro extraction, antioxidant ORG 2
  • 53. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page53 Antioxidant Potential of Tannin-rich n-Butanol Extract from Elaeis guineensis Leaf Chun Hui Ang1 , *Sit Foon Cheng1 , Chavasiri Warinthorn2 and Cheng Hock Chuah1 1 Unit of Research on Lipids, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 2 Natural Products Research Unit, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand *Email: sfcheng@um.edu.my Abstract Aqueous fraction partitioned from methanolic extract of fresh Elaeis guineensis leaf was found to exhibit antioxidant activity in various in-vitro bioactivity evaluation assays including DPPH radical-scavenging activity assay, lipid peroxidation (LPO) inhibition assay and beta-carotene bleaching assay, as compared to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) as standard. This active aqueous fraction was subjected to further fractionation to gain n-butanol tannin-rich sticky solid, then purified chromatographically by Sephadex LH-20 and RP C-18 silica gel columns. Phytochemical screening on these purified fractions suggested that Elaeis guineensis leaf has great potential to be used as natural antioxidant and worthy of further investigations. Keywords: Elaeis guineensis, antioxidant, tannins, n-butanol ORG 3
  • 54. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page54 Synthesis of Palm Oil-Based Polyester Polyols Wei Seng Ng1 , * Sit Foon Cheng1 , Choy Sin Lee2 and Cheng Hock Chuah1 1 Unit of Research on Lipids (URL), Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 2 Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, International Medical University, Bukit Jalil, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. *Email: sfcheng@um.edu.my Abstract Palm oil-based polyester polyols were prepared from palm oil-based glycerol monostearate (GMS) and glutaric acid in a solvent free and non-catalyzed condition. The effect of temperature and effect of ratio of functionality (OH:COOH) were studied. This reaction involved esterification reaction with evolving water. Deacidification of GMS was carried out before proceeding to synthesis of polyester polyol. The acid value and hydroxyl value of polyester polyol were measured according to AOCS Official Method Te 2a-64 and AOCS Official Method Cd 13-60 (1993) respectively. From the study of the effect of temperature, the acid value decreased from 163.67 to 28.38 mg NaOH/g sample at the temperature of 190℃. Further decrement of acid value to 24.19 mg NaOH/g sample was recorded at the temperature of 200℃. Hydroxyl values of polyester polyols were measured in the range of 82 to 225 mg KOH/g sample. The polyester polyol were also characterized with 1 H & 13 C NMR, FTIR, GPC, LCMS and HPLC. Polyester polyol exhibited the characteristic peaks at about 3550 and 1732 cm-1 which attributed to -OH & - C=O stretching of ester group, respectively, confirming the formation of polyester polyols. The molecular weights of polyester polyols were recorded in the range of 560 to 34039 Dalton. Keywords: dicarboxylic acid; palm oil-based monoglyceride; polyester polyol Suggested Reading: 1. Lee, C. S., Lee, S. C. (2011). Preparation of polyester polyol from epoxidized palm olein. Chinese Journal of Chemistry, 29(4), 840-846. 2. Abdel Hakim, A. A., Mosa Nassar, Aisha Emam, Maha Sultan. (2011). Preparation and characterization of rigid polyurethane foam prepared from sugar-cane bagasse polyol. Materials Chemistry and Physics, 129, 301-307. 3. Lin, S., Zhou, J.,Chen, J. (2009). Microwave synthesis of polyester polyol used for polyurethane soles. Faming Zhuanli Shenqing, CN 101538358 A 20090923. ORG 4
  • 55. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page55 Long Chain Saturated Structured Lipids via Enzymatic Interesterification using Lipase Rhizomucor miehei (Lipozyme RM IM) Wai-Ming Kok, *Sit-Foon Cheng. and Cheng-Hock Chuah. Unit of Research on Lipids (URL), Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya. *Email: sfcheng@um.edu.my Abstract There were several reports relating positional fatty acid distributions and fatty acids composition of triacyglycerols with obesity. Unsaturated fatty acid at sn-2 position is absorbed through intestinal mucosa in the form of monoacyglycerol, while the free saturated fatty acids from sn-1 and sn-3 positions are hardly absorbed and easily excreted. That is especially evidenced for long and saturated fatty acids. In the present study, structured lipids of long and saturated fatty acids were synthesized. High oleic sunflower oil (HOS) and behenic acid ethyl ester were interesterified using sn-1,3-specific lipase (10 m/m% of total substrates), Rhizomucor miehei (Lipozyme RM IM), at 65°C for 2 hours. The synthesized structured lipids were characterized and quantified using 13 C NMR as containing 65.1 mol% of SFA, 28.7 mol% of MUFA, 6.2 mol% of PUFA at sn-1,3 positions and 81.8% of MUFA, 18.2% of PUFA at sn-2 position. Overall, there were 42.9 mol% of SFA, 46.8 mol% of MUFA and 10.2 mol% of PUFA at sn-1,2,3 positions. Keywords: Enzymatic interseterification, lipase, triacyglycerols, qCNMR. ORG 5
  • 56. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page56 Alkaloid from Alstonia rostrata Lim Jun Lee1, *, Gan Chew Yan2 , Low Yun Yee1 , Lim Siew Huah1 and Kam Toh Seok1 1 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 2 University Malaysia of Computer Science & Engineering, Ground Floor, Menara Z10, No.2, Jalan Alamanda 2, Presint 1, 62000 Putrajaya, Wilayah Persekutuan, Malaysia. *Email: junlee1988@um.edu.my Abstract A total of 20 alkaloids were isolated and characterized from the bark extract of Malayan Alstonia Rostrata (Apocynaceae), including six leuconolam-rhazinilam alkaloids, four strychnan alkaloids, two vallesiachotaman alkaloids, a corynanthean alkaloid, an asipidospermatan alkaloid, an uleine alkaloid, a vallesamine alkaloid, an akuammiline alkaloid, two skythantine alkaloids and a 2,7-napthiridine alkaloid. The structures were determined using NMR and MS analysis. Keywords: Alstonia Rostrata; Apocynaceae; Alkaloids ORG 6
  • 57. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page57 Pyridine-Based Molecular Pincer for Transition Metal Complexation Rojrit Rojanathanes*1 , Kobkun Saepang2 , Supakit Seawpakorn2 , Patchanita Thamyongkit1 , and Wittawat Keawsongsang1 1 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University 2 Program in Petrochemistry and Polymer Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University *Email: rojrit@hotmail.com Abstract Two novel molecular pincers was successfully synthesized from chelidamic acid. Both molecular pincers contains 5 nitrogen atoms forming two different pocket sizes. The nitrogen-rich cavities are designed for complexation with some transition metal ions. Carboxylic group was introduced onto the 4- position of the central pyridine core as a linker for further application in solar cell technology. The carboxylic group was successfully fabricated by two different methods, chromate oxidation and copper-free Sonogashira coupling. Keywords: pincer, chelidamic, picolinic, complexation ORG 7
  • 58. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page58 Aza Diels-Alder Rection of Cyclic Imine with Danishefsky’s Diene Shah Bakhtiar Nasir and Noorsaadah Abd Rahman Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya *Email: shah_bakhtiar85@yahoo.com, noorsaadah@um.edu.my Abstract Danishefsky’s diene is a diene with a formal name trans-1-methoxy-3-trimethylsilyloxy-1,3- butadiene. It has been known for its efficiency in Diels-Alder reactions. Calculation of the energy for the reaction between cyclic imine derivatives and Danishefsky’s Diene were carried out to determine the energy level and the selectivity for the Aza Diels-Alder reaction. The calculation used density functional theory (DFT) basis set to discern the selectivity and the transition state of the reactions. This information then will further use for the total synthesis of Mitraphylline. Keywords: Aza Diels-Alder, Danishefsky’s Diene, Density Functional Theory (DFT) ORG 8
  • 59. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page59 Total Synthesis of (±)-Cyclollicinone Chun Keng Thy, Chin Fei Chee and Noorsaadah Abd Rahman Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia E-mail: ckthy1984@yahoo.com Abstract Cycloillicinone and illicarborene A were isolated from the Illicium anisatum1 and Illicium arborescens2. This compound belongs to the class of phytoquinoids which are known for their antitumor and cytotoxic activities. In this presentation, the total synthesis of a racemic cycloillicinone is described. The key step is Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction between a β- trans-ocimene and a racemic illicinone A. A chiral Corey-Bakshi-Shibata (CBS) oxazaborolidine was used as catalyst in the reaction. The β-trans-ocimene is commercially available and the racemic illicinone A was prepared in 4 steps from commercially available sesamol via alkylation, Claisen rearrangement, prenylation and finally prenyl migration3. In summary, the (±)-cyclollicinone was prepared in 5 steps with a total yield of 19.0% ORG 9
  • 60. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page60 Keywords: cycloillicinone; illicarborene A; Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction References 1. Kubo, M., Shima, N., Harada, K., Hioki, H., & Fukuyama, Y. (2011). New prenylated C6-C3 compounds from the twigs of Illicium anisatum. Chemical and Pharmaceutical Bulletin, 59, 898-901. 2. Liaw, C. C., Chen, Y. C., Fazary, A. E., Hsieh, J. L., Chen, S. Y., & Chien, C. T. (2013). A novel prenylated C6-C3 compound with estrogen-like activity from the fruits of Illicium arborescens. Phytochemistry letters, 6, 397-402. 3. Lei, X., Dai, M., Hua, Z., & Danishefsky, S. J. (2008). Biomimetic total synthesis of tricycloillicinone and mechanistic studies toward the rearrangement of prenyl phenyl ethers. Tetrahedron Letters, 49, 6383-6385.
  • 61. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page61 Total synthesis of (+)-Morusalbanol A and (+)-Sorocein B Jia Ti Tee, Chin Fei Chee and Noorsaadah Abd Rahman Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 68100, Kuala Lumpur, MALAYSIA. *Email: jennytee12302um.edu.my Abstract Morusalbanol A and sorocein B are biologically active oxabicyclic compounds which appear to originate from an intramolecular cyclisation /ketalisation of a cis-trans mulberry Diels-Alder adduct (i.e. 1 & 2). Due to its sparse distribution of its natural plant source, there has been no report on the synthesis of these compounds since its first isolation in 1991. Our work involved the synthesis of Morulsalbanol A (1) and Sorocein (2). In this presentation, we describe the synthesis of the key intermediates (3) and (4) leading to Morulsalbanol A (1) and Sorocein (2), respectively through the Diels-Alder reaction (DA) (Scheme 1). To investigate the effect of different substituents on the DA reaction, model studies have been carried out using various chalcones containing hydroxy (OH), methoxy (OMe) and ethoxymethoxy (EOM) groups. The presence of hydroxyl group at C2’ position was found to be essential for the intermolecular cycloaddition reaction. However, the low yield of product was obtained when the hydroxyl group at C2’ position was replaced with a methoxy group and no product observed for the one without hydroxyl group at C2’ position. Further efforts toward the total synthesis of morusalbanol A and Sorecein B are underway. Keywords: Diels-Alder reaction, Morusalbanol A, Sorocein B ORG 10
  • 62. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page62 Preparation and Fluorescence Behaviour Of Coumarin Terminated Monolayer On Silver Particle Nurul Izzatil Aisya Asri*, Issha Nadirah Ismail, Hairul Anuar Tajuddin, and Zanariah Abdullah Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. * Corresponding author: izzatilaisya@siswa.um.edu.my Abstract Coumarin and their derivatives are known fluorescent compounds potentially used for chemical sensors and biosensors. In this work, self-assembled monolayer with coumarin terminated was successfully prepared from chemisorptions of (1) onto silver particles. The method was applied according to Brust et.al with minor modification. The adsorbate structure (1) was purified and confirmed under 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR, FTIR and LCMS. The formation of the monolayer was investigated using FTIR, UV-visible and Fluorescence Spectrometers. The size of the particle suspension was determined at around 141.7 nm. The fluorescence of the monolayer was similar to with the emission of adsorbate in Ethanol indicates that monolayer of coumarin successfully formed on the silver surface. O OO S O OO S (1) Keywords: coumarin, self-assembled monolayer, fluorescence. ORG 11
  • 63. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page63 Synthesis and Fluorescence Characterization Of Azo-Coumarin And Azo-Naphthol Mohd Helmi Hussaini Dullah, Zanariah Abdullah, Hairul Anuar Tajuddin Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur Email: helmihussaini@ymail.com Abstract Azo compounds are widely used as dyes and colorants. They are also used as laser dyes, optical brighteners and fluorescent. In this work, azo-coumarin and azo-naphthol have been synthesized by coupling of 7-hydroxycoumarin and 2-naphthol with diazonium salts intermediate. The products were purified and confirmed by 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR, FTIR, UV- visible absorption and elemental analysis. The presence of IR transmission at 1470-1508 cm-1 indicates the formation of -N=N- in both products. Their absorption and fluorescence behavior were also characterized. Absorption occurred between 320-350 nm either in ethanol or chloroform suggesting that the products are chromophores. Azo linkages was found as reliable way to modify both naphthol and coumarin including their fluorescence character. Keywords: azo-coumarin, azo-naphthol, diazotization, fluorescence ORG 12
  • 64. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page64 Alkyl Disulfide as an Alternative Absorbate for Monolayer Formation on Silver Particles Issha Nadirah Ismail, Nurul Izzatil Aisya Asri, Hairul Anuar Tajuddin, and Zanariah Abdullah. Chemistry Department , Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Email: issha89@siswa.edu.my Abstract Two types of self-assembled monolayers on silver particles have been derived from alkyl disulfides with methyl and hydroxyl terminals. Both alkyl disulfides were synthetically prepared and purified before further analyzed using spectroscopic methods. Silver particles were then prepared from reduction of silver nitrate using phase transfer method in the presence of the alkyl disulfides. The products were purified either by solvent extraction or filtration with copious amount of solvents. Alkyl disulfide with hydroxyl terminal produced highly hydrophilic monolayer protected silver particles and the other absorbate with methyl terminal produced highly hydrophobic monolayer. The similar method was repeated with common alkyl thiols for background experiment. All samples were analyzed from FTIR and UV-visible absorption. The presence of strong -CH2- band indicated the formation of organic monolayers. Broad signal for alkyl disulfide with hydroxyl terminal was observed at around 3100 cm-1 , evident of hydroxyl terminated monolayer that consistent with our prediction and the background experiment. The formation of silver particles was indicated from absorption band above 400 nm. The results suggesting that disulfide group is also practical for anchoring group for the formation of self-assembled monolayer on silver particles. ORG 13
  • 65. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page65 Comparison studies of polyaniline nanocomposite with & without TiO2 for hydrazine detection Nirosa Raman*, Kavirajaa Pandian Sambasevam and Phang Sook Wai Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya *Email: pinkyphang@gmail.com Abstract This work presents the comparison of PANI and PANI/TiO2 nanocomposite chemical sensors for hydrazine detection. The PANI and PANI/TiO2 films were prepared by chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline by ammonium persulfate in the presence of dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt (AOT) as a dopant. The polymers were characterized by UV-Vis, FT-IR, FESEM and conductivity study. Besides, the response of the chemical sensors in terms of conductivity was measured at room temperature by using four point probe method. PANI and PANI/TiO2 sensor response for hydrazine detection was evaluated based on the wavelength shift of conducting and non-conducting states of PANI upon exposure to hydrazine at different concentrations. PANI/TiO2 exhibited better performance compared to PANI due to the complementary behaviour of TiO2 nanoparticles. As conclusion, PANI/TiO2 nanocomposite can be potentially applied for hydrazine detection. Keywords: Polyaniline, TiO2, Hydrazine, Nanocomposite Suggested Reading: 1. Yuzhen Li et. al., Applied Surface Science 273 (2013) 135-143. 2. E. Subramanian et. al., Indian Journal of Engineering & Material Sciences 19 (2012) 237-244. 3. M. Nagaraja et. al., Synthetic Metals 159 (2009) 718-722. PHY 1
  • 66. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page66 Fatty Acid Nanoparticle For Topical and Oral Delivery Applications Misni Misran*, Teo Yin Yin, Woo Juin Onn, Vicit Rizal Eh Suk, Yew Han Choi Colloid and Surface Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur Contact: +603-79676776/4079 Abstract Fatty acid nanoparticle is nano-sized colloidal system that has extensively been investigated for controlled drug delivery, cosmetic and pharmaceutical application. Fatty acid nanoparticles are prepared using fatty acids which possesses negligible toxicity, biocompatible and avoids the use of organic solvents in the preparation makes them as promising delivery system. In this work, a cost effective fatty acid nanoparticles with a wide range of particle size (from 50 nm to 500 nm) were developed for topical and oral applications. Figure 1: TEM micrograph (left) and confocal laser scanning micrograph (right) of fatty acid nanoparticles The TEM micrograph of fatty acid nanoparticles showed that they were spherical shape and laser confocal laser scanning micrograph revealed that lipophilic dye was successfully incorporated into the solid matrix of nanoparticles. Fatty acid nanoparticles with high encapsulation efficiency had successfully been developed by modified its composition with liquid fatty acid. High actives loaded fatty acid nanoparticles was then incorporated into base cream to evaluate its in vitro release using Franz Diffusion Cell. Fatty acid nanoparticles enriched cream demonstrated a controlled release for the period of 24 hours. Our finding PHY 2
  • 67. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page67 suggests that the fatty acid nanoparticles prepared could be a promising delivery system for the enhancement of the therapeutic efficacy in the topical and oral application. Figure 2: Fatty acid nanoparticles prepared with different mean particle size Keywords: Fatty acid, Nanoparticle, Topical delivery, Oral delivery Patent Filled No.: PI2013002585
  • 68. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page68 Y-shaped Carbohydrate Surfactants by ‘Click Chemistry’ for Oil-in-Water Emulsions T. H. Ali, R. S. D. Hussen* and T. Heidelberg Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur *Email: r_syahila@um.edu.my Abstract A series of Y-shaped, sugar-based surfactants varying in the linkage between two hydrophilic glucose units and a hydrophobic hydrocarbon chain were prepared by copper(I) assisted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). The compounds were obtained in moderate overall yields of 23-39% based on 6-7-step processes involving a chromatographic purification. The chemical structures were confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the physical-chemical properties, i.e. self-assembly, Kraftt and cloud temperatures, air-water interface behaviour as well as oil-in-water emulsions, were studied. While one compound displayed a cubic phase, all others exclusively formed micellar solutions. All Krafft temperatures were below 10 °C and no clouding was observed up to 80 °C. The air-water interface investigations revealed an influence of the linkage on the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Besides, the linkage also affected the emulsion behaviour. Keywords: Non-ionic surfactants, Carbohydrate surfactants, Y-shaped surfactants, Wedges shaped surfactants, Click chemistry synthesis PHY 3
  • 69. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page69 Preparation of microcapsules containing alkyd resin as core Nurshafiza Shahabudin, Rosiyah Yahya and Seng Neon Gan Chemistry Department, Science Faculty, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia *Email: shafizashah@siswa.um.edu.my Abstract This work reports the preparation of poly(urea-melamine-formaldehyde) (PUMF) microcapsules with a core of palm oil-based alkyd resin and the PUMF as the shell. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and ethylene maleic anhydride (EMA) were used as a viscosity modifier. The effect of various parameters on the microencapsulation of the PUMF-alkyd microcapsules was studied, these include dispersed phase to continuous phase ratio, agitation rate and surfactants concentration. The microcapsules obtained were inspected using digital microscopy, optical microscopy (OM) and also scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The alkyd core content and the PUMF shell materials was verified using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Thermal analysis by TGA has shown that the core and shell materials have different thermal stabilities. The resultant microcapsules appear white-yellowish and free-flowing, and have a rough, porous shell which was formed by PUMF nanoparticles. Their diameters range from 500 to 150 microns. The size of the microcapsules is controllable by the agitation rate and the ratio of the dispersed phase to continuous phase. Keywords: poly(urea-melamine-formaldehyde), alkyd, microcapsule, polymerization, surfactant Suggested Reading: 1. BROWN, E. N., KESSLER, M. R., SOTTOS, N. R. & WHITE, S. R. 2003. In situ poly(urea-formaldehyde) microencapsulation of dicyclopentadiene. Journal of Microencapsulation, 20, 719-730. 2. SURYANARAYANA, C., RAOB, K. C. & KUMARA, D. 2008. Preparation and characterization of microcapsules containing linseed oil and its use in self-healing coatings. Progress in Organic Coatings, 63, 72-78. 3. THEN, S., GAN S. N. & KASIM, N. H. A. 2011. Performance of Melamine Modified Urea–Formaldehyde Microcapsules in a Dental Host Material. Journal of Applied Polymer Science, 122, 2557-2562. PHY 4
  • 70. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page70 Adsorption of Methylene blue onto Chitosan-Based Activated Carbon: Isotherm and Kinetic Studies M.S. Nusari and *A. Mainal Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, MALAYSIA *Email: azizah_mainal@um.edu.my Abstract Adsorption of Methylene blue from aqueous solution onto activated carbon prepared from chitosan was studied in a batch system. Experiments were conducted as functions of initial dye concentration, pH, contact time, adsorbent dose and temperature. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated. The Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin isotherms models were used to analyze the experimental data. The experimental data matched well with the Freundlich isotherm. Adsorption kinetics data were modeled using the pseudo- first-order and pseudo-second-order equations. The results showed that the chitosan-based activated carbon could be an alternative for the more expensive adsorbents used for the elimination of Methylene blue from aqueous solution. Keywords: chitosan; activated carbon; adsorption; isotherm; kinetics PHY 5
  • 71. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page71 Hot-Spot Motif Characterization of Interface between a Designed Ankyrin-Repeat Protein and Its Target Kinase Vannajan Sanghiran Lee1,2 Vertika Gautam 1 Wei Lim Chong1 , Sharifuddin M. Zain1 , Noorsaadah Abd. Rahman1 1 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya 50603 , Kuala Lumpur Malaysia 2 Computational Simulation and Modeling Laboratory (CSML), Center of Excellence in Physics (ThEP), CHE, Ministry of Education, Bangkok 10400, Thailand Abstract DARPins (designed ankyrin repeat proteins) are a novel class of binding molecules with the potential to overcome limitations of monoclonal antibodies, hence allowing novel therapeutic approaches. As a small, single domain proteins which can be selected to bind any given target protein with high affinity and specificity. These characteristics make them ideal agonistic, antagonistic or inhibitory drug candidates. Altogether, DARPins are a prominent member of the next generation of protein therapeutics with the potential to surpass existing antibody drugs. With the knowledge of role of heterotrimeric complex between ILK, PINCH and Parvin in signaling platform, ILK-AR (3F6Q) with high affinity for PINCH1 was used as a model system to explore a structure-based computational protocol to probe and characterize binding affinity hot spots at protein–protein interfaces. For the purpose, long time scale dynamics simulations with GPU accelerated molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in AMBER12 have been performed to locate the hot spots of protein-protein interaction by the analysis of the (MM-PBSA/GBSA) of the MD trajectories. The dynamic conformational changes of the AR complex, 3F6Q, were observed by RMSD of all the Cα atoms in which steady oscillations indicate that the equilibrium has been obtained. The negative values of PB(TOT) of 3F6Q from both MM-PBSA/GBSA methods infer a good binding interaction between ILK-AR and PINCH. Moreover, critical residues for binding HIS32(-2.17), ARG42(-6.43), SER75(-3.3), HIS98(-1.43), PHE 108(-6.55), TRP109 (-4.59) were identified by decomposition energy. The negative values corresponding to the residues identified having critical role in favourable binding. Keywords: Integrin-linked kinase (ILK), Designed Ankyrin repeat protein (DARPins), Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations Suggested Reading 1. Michael, T., Stumpp, H., Binz, K., & Amstutz, P. (2008). DARPins: A new generation of protein therapeutics. Drug Discovery Today, 13(15/16), 695-701. PHY 6
  • 72. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page72 An in vitro biological evaluation of electrospun poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and bovine hydroxyapatite composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering Pedram Azari1 , Haris Akram3 , Gan Seng Neon1 , Rosiyah Yahya1 , Wong Chiow San2 , Belinda-Pingguan3 Murphy 1 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 2 Plasma Research Laboratory, Physics Department, Faculty of science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 3 Department of Biomedical engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Abstract Design and fabrication of a suitable scaffold for bone tissue regeneration with osteocunductive and osteoinductive properties have been a challenge for the last decade. Various biopolymers and bioceramics have been studied for their potential to serve as scaffolding materials. The success has been limited. However, lower risks of disease transfer as well as its lower costs compared to bone grafts, keeps the scaffold as a more feasible option for future studies. In this research, we have produced composite scaffolds of poly(3- hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) containing bovine derived micro particles of hydroxyapatite (BHA) through electrospinning. The morphology and structure of the scaffolds were studied by field emission microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. For biological evaluation, rat derived bone marrow stem cells were seeded on the scaffolds and cultured for a period of 14 days. Cell proliferation assay was performed to quantify the number of cells adherent to the scaffold. Alkaline phosphate assay was carried out to study any possible osteogenic stem cell differentiation. The results show that electrospun scaffolds of PHB/BHA promote cell growth as well as having osteocunductive properties. Keywords: Nanofiber, Electrospinning, Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate), Hydroxyapatite, Scaffolding PHY 7
  • 73. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page73 Synthesis, Characterization And Application Of Polyaniline (PAni) Optical Sensor For pH Detection Pameswari Subramani,Yeong Siang Chiam, Seng Neon Gan, Sook Wai Phang* Dept. of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia *Email: pinkyphang@gmail.com Abstract A simple glass fiber optical sensor coated with polyaniline (PAni) is demonstrated for pH detection. PAni is a conducting polymer which was synthesized using chemical oxidation method. In this study, dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT) is used as dopant while ammonium persulfate (APS) is used as oxidant during polymerization. PAni was synthesized using different dopant ratio (Aniline/APS/AOT) of “5:5:3”, “5:5:5” and “5:5:7”. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Ultra Visible (UV) spectroscopy was carried out to confirm the chemical structure of PAni. Furthermore, four point probe measurement was carried out to detect the conductivity of the resulted PAni. It is followed by the coating of PAni film on the optical sensor for pH detection. The response of this sensor was studied by the optical sensor set up with supporting characterization of FTIR, UV and conductivity measurement. Keywords: Polyaniline, conducting polymer, pH detection Suggested Reading: 1) Wu, G. & Zhang, H. 2013. Synthesis and characterization of camphor sulfonic acid fully doped polyaniline. Research and Application of Material, 1(1):5-8. 2) Kiran Kumari, Ali, V., Anand Kumar, Sushil Kumar & Zulfequar,M. 2011. D.C. conductivity and spectroscopic studies of polyaniline doped with binary dopant ZrOCl2/AgI. Bulletin of Material Science, 34(6): 1237–1243. PHY 8
  • 74. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page74 Hydrogen bonds formation in α/β-D-mannose and n-octyl-α/β-D- mannopyranoside using AIM and NBO analyses Zahrabatoul Mosapour Kotena*1,3 , Reza Behjatmanesh–Ardakani2 , Rauzah Hashim1 1 Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 2 Department of Chemistry, Payame Noor University, PO Box 19395-3697 Tehran, Iran 3 Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China *Email: zahrabatool2@gmail.com Abstract Density functional theory calculations on α/β-D-mannose (α/β-D-Man) and the corresponding glycosides of n-octyl-α/β-D-mannopyranoside (C8O-α/β-D-Man) were carried out for geometrical optimization and stability predictions at the B3LYP/6-31G level of theory. These compounds are related anomerically, since they differ by only the orientation of the hydroxyl group at the C1 position. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the hydroxyl group's orientations (axial vs. equatorial) at the C1 position on the intra-molecular interactions and the conformational stability of these isomers. The structural parameters of X-H∙∙∙Y intra- molecular hydrogen bonds were analyzed, while the nature of these bonds was considered using the atoms-in-molecules (AIM) approach. Natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) was used to determine bond orders and the effective non-bonding interactions. We have also reported thermodynamic properties and the electronic properties, such as the highest occupied molecular orbital, lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, ionization energy, electron affinity, electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, softness, and electrophilicity index in the gas phase for all compounds. These results showed that while α-anomers possess only one intra-molecular hydrogen bond, β-anomers possesses two intra-molecular hydrogen bonds, which further confirms the anomalous stability of the latter in the self-assembly phenomena. Keywords: Mannose, Hydrogen bonding, Density functional theory, Atoms in molecules theory, Natural bond orbital analysis PHY 9
  • 75. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page75 Bio-Functionalization of Inorganic Nanoparticles Abbas Abdulameer Salman and Thorsten Heidelberg* Chemistry Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, MY *Email: heidelberg@um.edu.my Abstract A group of surface modification reagents was developed and applied for the post-synthetic and the in-situ modification of luminescent nanoparticles. The reagents comprise of an ethylene oxide based core for good water solubility, a phosphonic acid anchor-group to mediate covalent binding to the nanocrystal, and a functional group suitable for coupling of a complementary functionalized receptor under mild ‘click’-chemistry conditions. Application of the reagent did neither alter size nor morphology of the particles, but enabled a significant surface loading of a model receptor. An average loading of about 20 molecules per particle with a correlated particle surface area of ~6 nm2 was found for narrowly distributed nearly spherical nanophosphors of ~6 nm diameter. These data indicate the bio-functionalization approach as promising for potential medicinal applications, e.g. as analytical marker or for in-vitro or in-vivo diagnosis, since the receptor loading is economic, while still providing a significant clustering effect to ensure strong receptor interactions. Keywords: Nanoparticle surface modification; ethylene oxide based phosphonates, click- coupling, biological receptor, carbohydrate coated nanocrystals PHY 10
  • 76. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page76 Exploration on the Role of Metal Cofactors and Water on the Catalytic Mechanism of Creatininase-Creatinine in Aqueous Solution from Molecular Dynamics Simulation/Quantum Study Vannajan Sanghiran Lee1,2 , Kanchanok Kodchakorn3 , Jitrayut Jitonnom2 , Piyarat Nimmanpipug2 , Prachya Kongtawelert3 , Bhusana Premanode4 , Wei Lim Chong2 , Sharifuddin M. Zain2 , Noorsaadah Abd. Rahman2 1 Computational Simulation and Modeling Laboratory (CSML), Center of Excellence in Physics (ThEP), CHE, Ministry of Education, Bangkok 10400, Thailand 2 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia 3 Thailand Excellence Center for Tissue Engineering and Stem Cells, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand 4 Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Imperial College, London, UK Abstract The catalytic reaction mechanism of creatine formation from the binding of creatinine to creatininase was explored using ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical combined approach. X-ray crystallography structure of creatininase-creatinine complex was modified before MD simulations. Two X-ray water molecules were observed to be catalytic from MD simulations as they remained in the binding sites. Molecular Mechanics Poisson- Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-PBSA) protocol was employed to calculate the binding free energy and it suggested that the binding activity were strong between creatinine and Zn2+ , Asp 45 and Glu 183. A two-step mechanism was proposed for water adding step and ring opening step for Mn2+ /Zn2+ and Zn2+ /Zn2+ pathway in presence of two catalytic waters. The pathway of the fragment in the binding region was successfully determined by synchronous transit methods with local density approximations with PWC functional. A lower activation energy occur during the water adding step and also a lower energy barrier for the ring opening step clarifying Zn2+ /Zn2+ pathway was the preferable pathway. Keywords: creatininase-creatinine, catalytic mechanism, molecular dynamics simulation, quantum mechanics PHY 11
  • 77. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page77 Synthesis and characterization of of new sol–gel titanium(IV) butoxide– cyanopropyltriethoxysilane in cooperated with imidazolium-based ionic liquids Shabnam Bakhshaei*, Sharifah Mohamad, Sharifuddin Md Zain Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, *Email: bakhshaei.s@gmail.com Abstract This work reports successful synthesis and characterization of titanium (IV) butoxide- cyanopropyltriethoxysilane hybrids (Ti-CNPrTEOS ) in cooperated with two selected imidazolium-based ionic liquids of 1-methyl-3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl)imidazolium chloride (M[MItmsp]-Ti-CNPrTEOS) and 1-benzyl-3- (trimethoxysilylpropyl)imidazolium chloride (Bz[MItmsp]-Ti-CNPrTEOS). The new sorbents were prepared through sol-gel method in acidic catalyzed condition. In synthesize of our sorbents, titanium(IV) butoxide was used as precursor, cyanopropyltriethoxysilane and imidazolium-based ionic liquids played as co-precursor. Relatively, the cation of ionic liquid was continuing attachment to the hydroxyl groups on the surface of silica and titania through methoxysilyl head to form hybrid sorbent Characterization studies were operated on Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), thermogaravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) to support the formation of sorbents structure. The results of different characterization techniques clarified the formation of mesoporous structures .This suggests new sorbents are capable of removing both polar and non-polar compounds. Keywords: Sol-gel method, titanium (IV) butoxide, Cyanopropyltriethoxysilane, imidazolium-based ion liquid. PHY 12
  • 78. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page78 Effect of Water Concentration on the Structural and Diffusion Properties of Guanidinium Trifluoromethanesulfonate Ionic Liquid− Mixture Naimah Haron1* , Nor Asrina Sairi1 , Mohamed Kheireddine Aroua2 , Yatimah Alias1 1 Chemistry Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 2 Chemical Engineering Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Abstract We have performed molecular dynamic simulations in order to investigate the properties of guanidinium trifluoromethanesulfonate [Gdm][Tfo] ionic liquid (IL) − water system. We observe the transition of those this mixture from pure IL to an aqueous solution by analyzing the changes in density and microscopic properties (radial distribution function and hydrogen bonding) as well as dynamical properties (diffusion coefficient) at 7 different concentration samplings of each mixture ranging from 0 to 100 mol % water. Our simulations discovered across all of the different structural, bonding and dynamical properties major structural changes consistent with a transition from IL−water mixture to aqueous solution at water concentration around 80 mol %. Among the structural changes observed was rapid increase in the frequency of hydrogen bonds, both water - water and water - anion. Finally, the diffusion coefficient of individual cation and anion show a rapid transition from rates consistent with diffusion in IL to rates consistent with diffusion in water beginning at 80 mol % water. Keywords: Molecular dynamics, Guanidinium ionic liquid, Water, Microscopic physical properties PHY 13
  • 79. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page79 CO2 Capture in Ionic Liquid: A review on mixed solvent systems Nor Asrina Sairi1 , Mohd Azlan Kassim1 , Rozita Yusoff2 , Mohamed Kheireddine Taieb Aroua2 1 Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 2 Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Abstract The growing concern of climate change and global warming has given rise to a thriving research field dedicated to finding solution. One area in particular has received considerable attention in lowering of CO2 emission from a large-scale source such fossil fuel power plant. Through numerous CO2 capture technologies have been proposed, absorption are currently believed to be the most suitable ones for fossil fuel power plant. The operation of absorption process is reviewed in this paper, together with the use of absorbent, such as physical absorbents, chemical absorbents and their blended solutions. Major concern such as CO2 capture efficiency, absorption rates, energy requirement in regeneration and volume of absorbents, are addressed. Keywords: CO2 capture, Absorption, Mixed solvent system PHY 14
  • 80. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page80 Transesterification reaction: Facile reaction by ionic liquids as catalyst – A review Zati Ismah Ishak1 , Nor Asrina Sairi1 , Yatimah Alias1 , Mohamed Kheireddine Taieb Aroua2 1 Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 2 Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Abstract The expanding production of biodiesel through transesterification reaction of vegetables oil and methanol have generated glycerol in quantities exceeding the current demand. As a fall of the glycerol price and the risk of seeing a large amount of glycerol being accumulated as waste, there is a need of efford towards converting glycerol into various value-added chemicals. The production of biodiesel and convertion of glycerol into glycerol carbonate as one of the value-added product hold a common method which is transesterification reaction. The reaction is catalyzed either by acid, base and enzyme catalyst. In this review paper, the ionic liquids catalyzed transesterification reaction towards biodiesel production and conversion of glycerol are throughly discussed. Ionic liquids has always been applied as environmentally-friendly catalyst in moving towards sustainable process. Keywords: Transesterification, Biodiesel, Glycerol, Ionic Liquids, Catalyst PHY 15
  • 81. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page81 The Role of Hydrogen Bonding by New Protic Ionic Liquids in Driving Phase Separation or Phase Miscibility in UCST Ternary Mixtures. Wan Melissa Diyana Wan Normazlan1* , Vijaya Ranganathan2 , Usman Ali Rana2 , Nor Asrina Sairi1 , Yatimah Alias1 and Douglas MacFarlane2 1 Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 2 School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton 3800, Victoria, Australia. *Email: melissamazlan@siswa.um.edu.my Abstract Extracting organic solvent from water are always become an interest in relevance industry. Liquid- liquid equilibria is one common type of separation process that is widely used industrially. In this study, two new protic ionic liquids i.e. bis-(2-ethylhexyl)ammonium tosylate and tris-(2- ethylhexyl)ammonium tosylate were synthesized and characterized to be used as an extractor to separate azeotropic mixture of water and isopropanol. The miscibility of protic ionic liquids with water and isopropanol generally increases upon heating, and both systems undergo an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) type phase transition. Minor changes on temperature were the parameter to control the phase separation. In order to understand more on the chemical activities during phase separation and phase miscibility, both ternary mixtures were analyzed using Proton Magnetic Nuclear Resonance (1 HNMR). The removal of hydrogen(s) attached to nitrogen of protic ionic liquid’s cation was the driving force for phase separation. This has been observed on both ternary mixtures. As an addition to this study, the compositions for protic ionic liquid, water and isopropanol in organic and aqueous rich phase were determined at phase separation temperature 293 – 315 K. The reported composition values indicated that bis-(2-ethylhexyl)ammonium tosylate were able to extract 60.97 % of isopropanol from water and tris-(2-ethylhexyl)ammonium tosylate successfully extracted 47.92 % of isopropanol. Hence, from these values, bis-(2-ethylhexyl)ammonium tosylate shows a better ability as an extractant compared to tris-(2-ethylhexyl)ammonium tosylate. Keywords: Ionic liquid, Protic ionic liquid, UCST, 2-propanol Suggested Reading: 1. Y. Kohno and H. Ohno, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 5063. 2. L. Zhang, J. Han, D. Dongshun and J. Jianbing, Fluid Phase Equilibria, 2007, 255, 179. 3. M.G. Freire, L.M.N.B.F. Santos, A.M. Fernandes, J.A.P. Cautinho and I.M. Marrucho, Fluid Phase Equilibria, 2007, 449. PHY 16
  • 82. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page82 A Fabrication of Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Substrate Using an Ionic Surfactant-Mediated Langmuir-Blodgett Method Prompong Pienpinijtham,1 Xiao Xia Han,2 Sanong Ekgasit,1,* and Yukihiro Ozaki2,* 1 Sensor Research Unit, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand. 2 Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337, Japan. *Email: prompong.p@chula.ac.th; sanong.e@chula.ac.th Abstract Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy is a sensitive technique for measuring the Raman spectrum of a small number of molecules adsorbed on a noble metal surface or nanoaggregate. In this study, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were employed to fabricate a gold nanoparticle film for using as SERS substrate by an ionic surfactant-mediated Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) method. The gold film was formed by adding ethanol to a gold colloid/hexane mixture in the presence of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB). Consequently, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) assembled at the water/hexane interface due to the decrease in surface charge density of AuNPs. DTAB was easily replaced by target molecules for SERS purposes because of the Coulombic interaction between DTAB and gold surface. The SERS enhancement factor of the 80 nm gold nanoparticle film was approximately 1.2  106 using crystal violet (CV) as a Raman dye. The SERS signal from the proposed DTAB- mediated film was approximately 10 times higher than that from the octanethiol-modified gold film, while the reproducibility and stability of this film compared to an octanethiol- modified film were similar. This method can also be applied to other metal nanostructures to fabricate metal films for use as a sensitive SERS substrate with a higher enhancement factor. Keywords: Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), Gold nanoparticles, Langmuir- Blodgett (LB), Ionic surfactant PHY 17
  • 83. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page83 Electrospun Titanium Dioxide Fibers as Stationary Phase in Thin Layer Chromatography Supamas Kanjanakunthon1 , Nipaka Sukpirom2 and Puttaruksa Varanusupakul2,* 1 Program of Petrochemistry and Polymer Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand 2 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand *Email: puttaruksa.w@chula.ac.th Abstract Electrospun fibers are interesting materials to use as stationary phase for thin layer chromatography (TLC). Titanium dioxide electrospun fibers are nanostructures, uniform, and good selectivity for basic compounds. The electrospinning factors including the electric potential, the distance between a needle and a collector, and the flow rate of the solution influenced the fiber morphology. In addition, the anatase structure of titanium dioxide was transformed to rutile structure when temperature of calcination was increased. The obtained electrospun fibrous titanium dioxide was then used as a stationary phase for thin layer chromatography (TLC). Separation of dye compounds containing basic groups were performed and compared with conventional silica-based TLC. The efficiency of the separation using the electrospun fibrous titanium dioxide TLC was better than that of the conventional silica-based TLC. In addition, the analysis time and the amount of consumables required for the analysis were subsequently reduced. Keywords: thin layer chromatography; titanium dioxide; electrospun fiber; stationary phase PHY 18
  • 84. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page84 Effects of Sintering Temperature on Conductivity and Oxygen Permeation of La0.3Sr0.7Co0.9Fe0.1O3 Perovskite Anucha Koedtruad,1 Koichiro Mitsuke2 and Soamwadee Chaianansutcharit1, * 1 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand 2 Department of Molecular Science, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Aichi, 4448585, Japan *Email: csoamwad@chula.ac.th Abstract Perovskite La0.3Sr0.7Co0.9Fe0.1O3 (LSCF3791) has been recognized as a potential cathode material for Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) due to its mixed electronic and ionic conductivity (MEIC). The electrical conductivity and oxygen permeation of materials varied depending upon the sintering temperatures from 1100o to 1300o C. LSCF sintered at 1100o C exhibited metallic-like behavior and dominated in p-type carrier. On the contrary, LSCFs sintered at 1200 and 1300o C showed semiconducting-like behavior with the decreasing of p-type carriers and the increase in n-type carriers. Moreover, LSCF sintered at 1200o C also exhibited high oxygen permeation rate as a result of high quantity of oxygen vacancy around Co3+ ion sites and low surface -CO3 2- , –OH species, respectively. Keywords: LSCF, Perovskite, Solid oxide fuel cell, conductivity, oxygen permeation PHY 19
  • 85. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page85 Formation of Branched-Chain Glycolipids Nano-Emulsions for Topical Drug Delivery Systems Norazlinaliza Salim, Rauzah Hashim and Noraini Ahmad Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Email: azlinalizas@um.edu.my Abstract Nano-emulsion is a dispersion of two immiscible liquids, usually water and oil, which are generally stabilized by a surfactant. It has droplet size in the nanometer range, typically less than 200 nm and visually it appears transparent to translucent1 . Low viscosity, high kinetic stability against creaming or sedimentation, and large interfacial area make nano-emulsions of increasing use in different practical applications2 . It offers several significant advantages including powerful permeation ability, no skin irritation, and high drug-loading capacity3 . The most important factor in the study of nano- emulsion system is the selection of an appropriate surfactant which will efficiently emulsify or solubilized the chosen active ingredients4 . Among the synthetic glycolipids, branched-chain glycolipids provide a closer alternative to natural ones, which are difficult to extract from natural resources5 . In this point of view, we have synthesized a new class of branched-chain glycolipids for surfactant functions6-7 . In this research, we focused on two glycosides namely, 2-hexyldecyl-β(/α)-D- glucoside (2-HDG) and 2-hexyldecyl-β(/α)-D-maltoside (2-HDM). Both have identical number of hydrocarbon chain length (C16) but differ in their head group size and polarity, hence differ in hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB). The self-assembly properties of the glycolipids have been studied, observing rich phase behaviours under thermotropic and lyotropic conditions7 . Due to their amphiphilic characteristics and specifically non-irritant to the skin, these synthetic branched-chain glycolipids, not only provided alternative nonionic surfactant, but also could be used as a new drug carrier system especially for the treatment of the skin diseases topically. Keywords: Surfactant; Branched-chain glycolipids; Nano-emulsion; Topical drug delivery. References: 1. Solans, C., Izquierdo, P., Nolla, J., García-Celma, M. J. Curr. Opin. Colloid Interface Sci. 2005, 10, 102- 110. 2. Tadros, T., Izquierdo, P., Esquena, J., Solans, C. Adv. Colloid Interface Sci. 2004, 108-109, 303-318. 3. Mason, T. G., Wilking, J. N., Meleson, K., Chang, C. B. and Graves, S. M. J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 2006, 18(41), 635–666. 4. Kuneida, H., Shinoda, K. J. Colloid Interface Sci. 1985, 107(1), 107-121. 5. Hill, K., von Rybinski, W., Stoll, G. Alkyl Polyglycosides: Technology, Properties and Applications, VCH, Weinheim, 1997. 6. Hashim, R., Hashim, H. H. A., Rodzi, N. Z. M, Hussen, R. S. D., Heidelberg, T. Thin Solid Films 2006, 509, 27-35. 7. Ahmad, N., Ramsch, R. Esquena, J., Solans, C., Tajuddin, H. A., Hashim, R. Langmuir 2012, 28(5), 2395- 2403. PHY 20
  • 86. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page86 Kinetic and isotherm adsorption of phenol from wastewater using activated carbons prepared from jatropha seed husks by KOH activation Faheem Ahmed Qaid*, Abdul Hamid bin Yahaya and Rosiyah binti Yahya Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, 50603 Malaysia *Email: absifaheem@yahoo.com Abstract Presence of phenol in the environment has been a serious concern especially with rapid industrialization which has created new uses for phenol. The acute toxicity of phenol to aquatic life and humans and the stringent effluent standard to be met by industries as specified by regulatory organizations have necessitated the development of innovative, effective and economical methods for treating wastewater bearing the phenol. In this study batch isotherm and kinetic studies were carried out on a laboratory scale to evaluate the adsorption capacity and contact time on phenol removal. The equilibrium time was 250 minutes. The kinetics of adsorption of phenol ions on Jatropha seed husks could be adequately described by the Langmuir model and pseudo-second order reaction rate model . Keywords: Adsorption, phenol, waste water, Jatropha seed husks PHY 21
  • 87. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page87 Synthesis and Mesomorphic Properties of Schiff’s Base Ester with Terminal Methoxy Substituent Yee Ting Chong1 , Norazilawati Muhamad Sarih1, * Sie Tiong Ha,2 Rezaul Karim Sheikh3 1 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Malaya, Lembah Pantai, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 2 Department of Chemical Science, Faculty of Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jln Universiti, Bandar Barat, Kampar, 31900 Perak, Malaysia. 3 Department of Applied Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi-6205, Bangladesh. * Email address: nmsarih@um.edu.my Abstract Liquid crystal is fascinating material and often applied in organic electronic and energy conversion applications. N-(4-Methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline (MBBA) was the first synthesized Schiff base liquid crystal that exhibit nematic phase at room temperature1 and mesomorphic properties of aromatic Schiff’s base were arising from terminal substituents either flexible chains or varying in the polarity of the terminal groups were previously reported in previous studies.2-5 In previous studies, the results revealed that Schiff base and ester are some of the common useful linking units for generating mesomorphism in two and three aromatic rings compounds.2-5 The presence of different polarity of terminal substituents has been well reported that will either promote or suppress the mesomorphic properties. A homologues series (Figure 1) of two aromatic ring Schiff base ester containing alkanoyloxy chain (n = 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 and 18) in one end and methoxy group in other end were synthesized based on modification methods from literatures.6-7 The structures of the compounds were determined by spectroscopic methods such as FTIR, 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR. Phase transitions temperatures were determined through thermal analysis through using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The liquid crystalline textures of the newly synthesized compound were determined through polarized optical microscope (POM). All of the synthesized compounds were showed the present of nematic phase. Nematic phase is favourable due to the terminal intermolecular interaction was much stronger than that of the lateral intermolecular interaction and hence disrupted the lamellar packing of the molecules. PHY 22
  • 88. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page88 Figure 1: Structure of 4-n-alkanoyloxybenzylidene-4’-methoxy-aniline Keywords: Liquid Crystals; Schiff base; Nematic References 1. H. Kelker, B. Scheurle, Angew. Chem. Int. Edn. 81 (1969) 903. 2. Z. Galewski, H. J. Coles, J. Mol. Liq. 79 (1999) 77. 3. J. Godzwon, M. J. Sienkowska, Z. Galewski. Acta Physica Polonica A. 113 (2008) 4. 4. S. Sakagami, T. Koga, A. Takase. Liq. Cryst. 29 (2002) 1087. 5. S.T. Ha, G. Y. Yeap, P. L. Boey. Australian Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences. 3 (2009) 3417. 6. G. Y. Yeap, W. S. Ooi, Y. Nakamura et al. Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 381 (2002) 169. 7. G. Y. Yeap, S. T. Ha, P. L. Lim et al. Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 423 (2004) 73.
  • 89. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page89 Preparation and characterization of poly (3-hydroxybutyric acid)/poly(vinyl acetate) thin films 1 Olla .H.Sharhan, 1 Abdul Hamid Yahaya and 2 Mohamed Mahmoud Nasef 1 Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 2 Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering , University Teknologi Malaysia, Jalan Semarak, 54100 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Email: Olla_sh@yahoo.com Abstract Poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid) (PHB) is an interesting biodegradable polymer having properties similar to polypropylene (PP) that was not applied due to its poor mechanical properties and biodegradability. So this study aims to blend PHB with poly (vinyl acetate) (PVAc) at various ratios to improve its working properties and confer it a controlled biodegradability that can be recovered by converting PVAc to polyvinyl alcohol upon disposal by treatment with NaOH solution. In this study, films of the blends were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The morphology and thermal properties of (PHB) and (PVAc) blends were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Results suggest that PVAc is compatible with PHB and molecular chain interaction takes place as revealed by the decrease in intensity of C=O of PHB ester group with the increase in PVAc ratio. Although the addition of polyvinyl acetate shifts the onset of PHB decomposition to higher temperature, the PHB/PVAC blends are thermally more stable in terms of the pure polymers. PHY 23
  • 90. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page90 Development of in vivo Inflammation Imaging Probes Sung-Jin Park1 , Nam-Young Kang1 , Anandhkumar Raju1 , Xiao Wei Emmiline Ang1 , Animesh Samanta1 , Seong-Wook Yun1 and Young-Tae Chang*,1,2 1 Singapore Bioimaging Consortium Agency for Science, Technology and Research 2 Department of Chemistry & Med Chem Program Life Sciences Institute, National University of Singapore *Email: chmcyt@nus.edu.sg Abstract Inflammation is immune response of a body normally triggered by infection, tissue damage or allergic substance. During immune reaction, macrophages are localized at the center, because macrophages infiltrate into inflamed area, initiate immune response by antigen-presenting and terminate immune reaction by scavenger functions (phagocytosis). Therefore, development of technology for macrophage visualization in live animals has been of great interest for the better understanding of inflammation and the development of therapeutics for immune disorders. Here, we developed small molecule probes that can selectively detects macrophages by diversity oriented fluorescent library approach (DOFLA), and can show in vivo animal imaging in the inflamed region, which was induced by lipopolysaccharide, bacteria and cancer cell line, respectively. Our developed probes were applied for optical in vivo imaging by Fluorescence Stereomicroscopy, IVIS Spectrum, Fluorescence Molecular Tomography and Multi-Spectral Optoacoustic Tomography. So, we suggest that the developed probes can be utilized for optical in vivo imaging tools and can be the motif of non- invasive imaging probes for PET. In addition, our probes can be applied for intra-organ inflamed area like atherosclerosis and Alzheimer disease. Keywords: inflammation, imaging probe, macrophage, in vivo animal imaging PHY 24
  • 91. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page91 Development of in vivo imaging probes for pancreatic islets by Diversity Oriented Fluorescence Library Approach (DOFLA) Nam-Young Kang1 , Sung-Chan Lee1 , Sung-Jin Park1 , Seong-Wook Yun1 , and Young-Tae Chang1,2,* 1 Laboratory of Bioimaging Probe Development, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium, Agency for Science, Technology and Research , Singapore 138667, Republic of Singapore. 2 Department of Chemistry & NUS MedChem Program of Life Sciences Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543, Republic of Singapore * Correspondence should be addressed to: chmcyt@nus.edu.sg Abstract Glucose homeostasis is mainly regulated by hormones released from the islets of Langerhans. Disruption or dysregulation of hormone production and secretion in the islets lead to hyperglycemia and diabetes. Visualization of insulin secreting pancreatic beta cell is a critically important research component in diabetic study, but an in situ imaging probe for the intact Langerhans islets is lacking at present. Considering the central role of islet cells in the development of diabetes and as the targets for treatment, it is useful to develop a non-invasive method to examine functional states of the islet cells. Therefore, we propose to develop novel Bioimaging Probes for pancreatic islet via a unique approach “Diversity Oriented Fluorescence Library Approach (DOFLA)” composed of more than 10,000 intrinsically fluorescent small molecules by combinatorial chemistry. As an expansion of high throughput DOFL screening, we discovered a live cell imaging glucagon probe that stains alpha cell selectively. We aim to discover fluorescent compounds that stain pancreatic islet selectively. Selected fluorescent compounds will be further optimized as bioimaging probes to allow a unique and powerful tool for pancreatic islet imaging and facilitated isolation as well as in vivo imaging of islets byoptical imaging, nuclear imaging (PET/SPECT) and MRI. Keywords: Langerhans islets, Diabetes, Bioimaging Probes, DOFLA PHY 25
  • 92. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page92 Fluorescent chemical imaging probes for live stem cells Young-Tae Chang1,2 and Seong-Wook Yun2 1 Department of Chemistry & NUS MedChem Program of Life Sciences Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore. 2 Laboratory of Bioimaging Probe Development, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore. *Email: chmcyt@nus.edu.sg Abstract There has been a remarkable advancement in the technology of using stem cells during last decade. Now human embryonic stem cells can be expanded and differentiated into specific types of cells in vitro. Somatic cells obtained from patients suffering from genetic diseases can be reprogrammed into pluripotent stem cells to be used for disease mechanism study and drug development. Neural stem cells transplanted into damaged lesion of the brain or spinal cord help recover impaired function. For successful utilization and application of the stem cells, however, strict control of their quality is required due to their tendency to differentiate into heterogeneous cell types. Differentiation stages and types of stem cells have been typically identified by detecting marker expressions using antibodies, which often requires cells to be fixed and permeabilized. Therefore, development of more convenient tools that can be applied to detect, isolate and characterize live stem cells is necessary. By image-based high content screening of our Diversity Oriented Fluorescence Library (DOFL), we discovered colorful fluorescent chemical probes CDy1, CDg4 and CDb8 that stain embryonic stem cells, and CDr3 that stains neural stem cells selectively. Applications of the probes to assay development and adult stem cell isolation will be further discussed. Keywords: DOFL, Embryonic stem cell, Imaging Probe, Live cell imaging, Neural stem cell PHY 26
  • 93. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page93 Near-Infrared Raman Reporters for SERS-based in vivo Cancer detection Animesh Samanta1 ,Kaustabh Kumar Maiti,2 U. S. Dinish1 andYoung-Tae Chang* 1 Affiliation of first authorSingapore Bioimaging Consortium, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore 2 CSIR-National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science & Technology (NIIST), Chemical Science & Technology Division (CSTD), Organic chemistry section, Industrial Estate, Thiruvananthapuram - 695019, Kerala, India *Email: chmcyt@nus.edu.sg Abstract We explored the application of tricarbocyanine dyes as Raman reporters for advanced imaging techniques such as Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS). SERS probes are based on the 109 –1015 fold scattering enhancement caused by the proximity of Raman active signature molecules to the surface of metal nanoparticles (NPs) which can be modulated with molecular recognition motifs to render diagnostic tools for optical imaging and therapeutic studies. However, the preparation of ultrasensitive SERS probes is hampered by the limited availability, sensitivity, and reproducibility of Raman-active compounds at near-infrared (NIR) region. We designed a combinatorial approach to discover highly sensitive SERS reporters and identified CyNAMLA-381 as the most sensitive NIR SERS reporter. Furthermore, we conjugated target specific antibody such as scFv anti-HER2 and analyzed its cell localization by mapping experiments. Finally, we validated the in vivo application of this targeted nanotags after i.v. injection in nude mice bearing xenografts generated form SKBR3 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, this Reporter was applied along with two more partners (Cy7LA and Cy7.5LA) for multiplex targeted in vivo cancer detection in mice bearing xenograft generated from OSCC cells. Keywords: tricarbocyanine, gold nanoparticles, tumor, surface-receptor, sensitive. PHY 27
  • 94. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page94 Effect Of Pure Cationic Micelle ([Ctabr]T On The Rate Of Alkaline Hydrolysis Of N-(2-Aminophenyl)Phthalimide Wan Hamdah Wan Ahmad Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur Email: hamdah@siswa.um.edu.my Abstract The hydrolysis of N-(2-aminophenyl)phthalimide (N2AmPhPT) (2.0 × 10-4 M) was studied within the total concentration of [CATBr]T ranging from 4 × 10-4 M to 1.7 × 10-1 M at 2 × 10- 3 M NaOH respectively and 35ºC. Pseudo first-order rate constants, kobs are shown graphically in Fig.1. The observed data were treated in the frame of the pseudophase ion exchange (PIE) theory proposed by Romsted1 (Eq.1). The nonlinear least-squares calculated values of mr Mk and CTA SK are (38.8±2.7) s-1 and (49.2 ± 4.1)M-1 respectively, with 103 kw = 71.6 s-1 at 105 cmc = 4.00M. PHY 28
  • 95. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page95 Quantitative Correlation Between Counterion (X) Affinity to Cationic Micelles and X-Induced Micellar Growth for X = 2,6-Dichlorobenzoate Ions Norazizah A. Razak*, Nor Saadah M. Yusof and M. Niyaz Khan Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia *E-mail: norazizah_razak@yahoo.com Abstract A semi empirical kinetic (SEK) method has been used to determine the ratio of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr) micellar binding constants of counterion X- and Br- (a reference counterion), i.e. KX/KBr (= RX Br ). The values of KX and KBr have been derived from the kinetic parameters obtained in the presence spherical/non-spherical and spherical micelles, respectively. This rather new method gives the respective mean values of RX Br as 4.7 ± 0.6 for X = 2,6-Cl2C6H3CO2 - . Literature report on the values of RX Br for X = 2,6- Cl2C6H3CO2 - (2,6-Cl2Bz- ) for which the reported value is 5.0. The values of RX Br offer quantitative evidence of the perception that the strong micellar binding of certain counterions is the cause of the micellar structural transition from spherical to cylindrical to wormlike entangled micelles. Rheological properties, such as Newtonian behavior, reveal indirectly the presence of spherical micelles (SM) in the CTABr micellar solutions containing MX for X = 2,6-Cl2Bz- . The micelles remain spherical within [2,6-Cl2Bz- ] range 0.01 – 0.34 M at 0.015 M CTABr. It can be concluded that the magnitudes of the thermodynamic of ion-exchange constant, RX Br for ion exchange X- /Br- on the cationic micellar surface in aqueous solution could affect the physical properties such as the structure of micelles of ionic surfactant solutions. Keywords: Rheology, Kinetics, Spherical micelles, Counterion (X- ) effects, Micellar growth, Quantified X- - affinity to micelles PHY 29
  • 96. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page96 Multidonor Substituted Perylene Dyes through Unusual Bromination of Perylene Monoimide Ashok Keerthi, 1, 2 Yeru Liu,2, 3 Qing Wang,2, 3 Suresh Valiyaveettil1, 2 * 1 Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543 2 NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 3 Department ofMaterials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 *Coresponding authour e-mail: chmsv@nus.edu.sg Abstract Recently, design and synthesis of advanced materials using perylene chromophore has been an active area of research. Unique light-harvesting and redox properties on conjunction with high thermal stabilities of perylene dyes offer potential applications in organic photovoltaics. Perylene monoimide (PMI) was brominated to give tetra- and tribrominated molecules, which undergoes Suzuki coupling reaction with 4-(diphenylamine) phenyl boronic acid and gave PMI derivatives. The photophysical, electrochemical and theoretical calculations of the synthesized compounds were investigated. Singles crystals of tetra substituted PMI were grown and studied in detail. The structure property relationships were studied to see the effect of position and number of substituents on perylene core unit. All molecules showed a broad absorption up to 750 nm. Corresponding anhydrides of PMIs were used for fabrication of dye- sensitized solar cells. Acknowledgement: The authors acknowledge the support from Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore for funding and technical support. WC thanks the National University for a graduate scholarship. PHY 30
  • 97. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page97 Morphology Studies of Doped Polyaniline Nanocomposites Containing TiO2 Nanoparticles and Graphene Nanoplatelets Perakassh veloo, Yen Nee Koh, Sook Wai Phang, * Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. *Email: pinkyphang@gmail.com Abstract Polyaniline (PAni) nanocomposite containing hexanoic acid (HA) as dopant, titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles and graphene nanoplatelets was synthesized by using chemical oxidation method. In this study, magnetic material (graphene nanoplatelets) and dielectric material (TiO2) was added during polymerization. The nanocomposites were characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, UV-Vis (UV) spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffractometry (XRD) and Thermogravimetric analysis. Additional analysis on the conductivity and morphology studies was investigated by using four-point probe and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). The nanocomposites recorded conductivity in the range of 3.559 X 10-1 – 2.557 S/cm. Keywords: Polyaniline, Nanocomposite, Graphene nanoplatelets Suggested reading: 1. Amantia, D., Gutierrez, D., Aubouy, L., & Mart, M. (2013). with exfoliated graphene nanoplatelets ( GNPs ), 10450–10457. 2. Li, Y., Peng, H., Li, G., & Chen, K. (2012). Synthesis and electrochemical performance of sandwich-like polyaniline/graphene composite nanosheets. European Polymer Journal, 48(8), 1406–1412. 3. Xiang, J., & Drzal, L. T. (2012). Templated growth of polyaniline on exfoliated graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) and its thermoelectric properties. Polymer, 53(19), 4202–4210. PHY 31
  • 98. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page98 Development of Photosensitive Ceramic Thin Films for Photovoltaic Applications Muhammad Adil Mansoor, Muhammad Mazhar and Zainudin Artfin. Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Abstract Production of clean energy is a big challenge to humanity because the conventional fossil fuel or nuclear energy are highly environment polluting. The alternate environment friendly sources of energy are solar energy and hydrogen therefore efforts are being made to discover benign materials for photovoltaic applications and production of H2 from abundantly available water source. The energy difference between the oxygen evolution potential and the hydrogen evolution potential is 1.229 eV at 25 o C.1 Therefore; ideally one would like to have a chemically and optically stable semiconductor, in which the conduction and valence bands are positioned favourably so that they straddle the hydrogen and oxygen evolution potentials. To overcome the overpotential which is mainly associated with oxygen evolution, a semiconductor material with a band gap of 1.8-2.0 eV is preferred. This poster presentation highlights synthetic strategy for the synthesis of single source molecular precursors that are capable of delivering all the elements of interest bonded in one structure so that desired metal oxide thin films can be deposited onto the target substrate.2-6 Such molecular precursors provide opportunity to deposit thin films by Aerosol Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (AACVD) with controlled composition and architecture.7,8 We therefore report the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of specifically tailored new single source molecular precursors (i.e. [Mn2Zn2(TFA)8(THF)4] (1), [Fe6(PhCOO)10(acac)2(O)2(OH)2] (2), [Fe2(acac)2(dmaeH)2]2+ [ZnCl3(THF)]- (3) and their use for the deposition of nanostructured MnZnO3, α-Fe2O3, ZnFe2O4 thin films respectively on FTO glass substrates using AACVD for their possible technological applications. References: 1. A. Tahir and K. G. U. Wijayantha, Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry, 2010, 216, 119. 2. M. Hamid, A. A. Tahir, M. Mazhar, M. Zeller, K. C. Molloy, and A. D. Hunter, Inorg. Chem. 2006, 45, 10457. 3. M. Veith, Dalton Trans.2002,2405. 4. V. G. Kessler, Chem. Commun.2003,1213. 5. A. C. Jones, J. Mater. Chem. 2002,12,2576. 6. M. Veith, M. Haas and V. Huch, Chem. Mater. 2005, 17,95. 7. A. Brethon, L. G. Hubert-Pfalzgraf and J. C. Daran , Dalton Trans. 2006,250. 8. M. Afzaal, M. A. Malik and P. O'Brien J. Mater. Chem..2010,20,4031 PHY 32
  • 99. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page99 Development of a Reusable Biosensor for Small Molecules Adam Henry Sivapathama , Nadiya Taha Darwisha , Mai Mai Khooa and Sook Mei Khora* a Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, MALAYSIA *Corresponding author: Dr. Sook Mei Khor; E-mail: naomikhor@um.edu.my; Tel: +603- 79677022/Ext: 2520; Fax: +603-79674195. Abstract Biosensors are chemical sensors that can transform chemical information into analytically useful signals. They provide simple, rapid and cost-effective analyses in various industries. They are reagent-free, non-toxic waste producing and have high selectivity and sensitivity, among others. A reusable biosensor allows repeatable usage over time which is advantageous in that it provides high throughput analysis with high accuracy, precision and better reproducibility. Thus, this study aims to develop a new method for surface regeneration in order to create a biosensor which can be used repeatedly for small molecules detection, in this case, biotin. Indeed, small molecule detection is important in the development of novel pharmaceuticals, in relation to drug design. Pulse voltammetry methods were explored to regenerate the sensing interface. AN-EV 1
  • 100. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page100 Identification and Evaluation of Air Pollution Tolerance Index of Plant Species under the Impacts of Marble Industry Pollutants of Potwar Region of Pakistan 1,2,3 Mehwish Jamil Noor, 2 Muhammad Aqeel Ashraf, 3 Mushtaq Ahmad,1 Amber latif, 1 Sonia Fatima 1 Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of science and Technology, Fatima Jinnah Women University, Rawalpindi. Pakistan 2 Geology Department, University Malaya 50603 Kuala Lumpur 3 Department of Plant Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan Abstract Biological monitoring and assessment studies due to Marble industries pollutants were carried out using Air Pollution Tolerance Index (APTI) of plants. Four parameters ascorbic acid, total chlorophyll, relative water content and leaf extract pH of selected plant leaves were carried out with a view to find out the air pollution tolerance as well as sensitivity of the plant species and signifying the APTI of different plants life forms. Vitisvinifera, Lantana camara, Ricinuscommunis, Calatropisprocera, Psidiumguajava, Eucalyptus globules, Cannabis sativa, Broussonetiapapyrifera and Amaranthusviridiswere selected in pairs from experimental and control site and were analyzed for their biochemical and physiological parameters.APTI was higher for Lantana camara showed highest APTI and tolerance among selected plant species.Ascorbic acid content was nearly equal in all species from both sites. Higher Relative water content and pH values for leaf extract, Stomatal clogging, reduction in average leaf area, chlorosis, wilting, brown patches, and necrosis was observed in vegetation in experimental sight. Soil moisture was less in experimental site. It was concluded that marble industries are having a considerable impact on the surrounding vegetation. It was concluded that marble industries are having a considerable impact on the surrounding vegetation. Keywords: Marble, pollutants, plant species, biological monitoring, assessment AN-EV 2
  • 101. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page101 Biodegradation Studies of Dichlorvos under Different Sets of Conditions 1, 2 Rizwana Naureen, 1 Imran Hashmi, 3 Mohd, Jamil Maah, 2 Ismail Yusoff, 2 Muhammad Aqeel Ashraf 1 Institute of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, National University of Science and Technology, Islamabad, Pakistan 2 Geology Department, University Malaya 50603 Kuala Lumpur 3 Department of Chemistry, University Malaya 50603 Kuala Lumpur Abstract The objective of the research was to isolate dichlorvos (2, 2 – dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate) degrading strain of Pseudomonas sp. The acclimatized bacterial culture was identified through morphological, physical and biochemical characterization. Identification was performed up-to species level using analytical profile index (API), where isolated strain was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Degradation was studied at different pH, temperature and at different dichlorvos concentrations of 100, 300 and 500 mg L-1 . The decrease in organic matter was measured after every 24 h, indirectly by Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) while degradation metabolites of dichlorvos were analyzed by GC-MS. The results showed that maximum degradation was achieved for 100 mg L-1 of dichlorvos after 120 h of incubation period at pH 7 and 30o C, whereas the COD removal was 80, 65 and 53% at varying pH while at varying temperature it was 86,67 and 59% for 100, 300 and 500 mg/L, respectively. Quantitative analysis through gas chromatography showed percent degradation of 85, 64 and 60% at pH 7 for 100, 300 and 500 mg/L of dichlorvos, whereas at 30o C, the maximum degradation observed was 91, 73 and 68%, respectively. The degradation metabolites of dichlorvos extracted with n-hexane were studied using retention time and fragmentation pattern by GC-MS analysis. Dimethylphosphate and dimethylmonochlorvos were major degradation by-products with m/z value of 109 and 185 respectively, indicating a 90% degradation rate. Keywords: Dichlorvos, isolation, pseudomonas sp., characterization, degradation AN-EV 3
  • 102. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page102 Prediction of cetirizine hydrochloride content in medication tablet using ATR-FTIR and PLS Shiau Yi Tan and Kah Hin Low* Department of Chemistry, University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia *Email: lowkayin@um.edu.my Abstract An alternative approach for the determination of cetirizine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical tablet was developed using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry coupled with chemometric. Partial least square regression models were constructed using unit vector normalized and first order derivatized spectra in the region of 1800-1100 cm-1 . The coefficient of determination found to be more than 0.9 with the root mean square of errors of prediction ~0.2 % for both cases. The proposed approach is relatively simple, rapid and compatible to the assay by high performance liquid chromatography. Keywords: cetirizine hydrochloride, chemometric, infrared, partial least square Suggested Reading: 1. Beebe, KR., Pell, RJ. & Seasholtz, MB. (1998). Chemometrics A Practical Guide. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2. Low, K.H., Zain, S.Md., Abas, M.R., Misran, M. & Ali Mohd, M. (2009). J. Korean Chem. Soc. 53(6):717-716. 3. Müller, ALK., Flores, EMM., Müller, EI., Silva, FEB. & Ferrão MF. (2011). J. Braz. Chem. Soc.. 22 (10): 1903-1912. AN-EV 4
  • 103. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page103 Remediation of Heavy Metal Contaminated Soil Using Banana Stem as the Organic Fixing Additive Mehrnaz Ashrafi1 *, Sharifah Mohamad2 , Ismail Yusoff3 , Fauziah Shahul Hamid1 1 Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya 2 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya 3 Department of Geology, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya * Email: mehrnaz_ashrafi@yahoo.com Abstract Heavy metal pollution of soil is an increasingly urgent problem all over the world mainly due to anthropogenics activities. In this study banana stem amendment, as an inexpensive fixing agent, was applied to an artificially metal-contaminated soil to fix Pb, Cd and Zn in the soil. A metal leaching experiment was designed to simulate the rainfall conditions in order to obtain information on the potential mobility of metals. The results from the metal leaching analysis revealed that banana stem amendment generally reduced the Cd leaching. Specifically, the cumulative amount of Cd in the leachates after 6 leaching events was reduced by 78% in the amended soil. Moreover, a sequential extraction analysis was carried out at the end of the experiment to find out the speciation of the heavy metals. The findings from the sequential extraction analysis indicated that the addition of banana stem amendment notably reduced exchangeable form of Cd and increased its residual form in the soil. Our study implies that banana stem amendment can be used as a low-cost and environmentally safe additive for the remediation of Cd-contaminated soil. Keywords: Heavy metals, Remediation, Metal leaching, Sequential extraction AN-EV 5
  • 104. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page104 Development and Validation of Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometer (LCMSMS) for the Simultaneous Determination of Common Drugs of Abuse in Forensic Cases in Malaysia: Application to Dried Blood Stain (DBS) Fathiah Zubaidi1,2 , Guan Huat Tan1 , Choo Yeun Mun1 1 Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 2 Department of Chemistry Malaysia, Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation, Petaling Jaya, Malaysia. Abstract A novel liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometer (LC-MS-MS) with multiple reactions monitoring procedure has been developed for the simultaneous determination of multiple common drugs of abuse in postmortem blood specimens for medico legal purposes in Malaysia. This concise method is capable to facilitate twenty multiple drugs of abuse and their metabolites commonly found in medico-legal cases in a single run, which significantly reduces analysis time compared to separated run. The results demonstrated high selectivity with the use of Restek PFP Propyl (5 μm, 50 x 2.1 mm i.d.) column. Different buffer systems were studied and 2 mM ammonium formate with 0.2% formic acid in water: 2 mM ammonium formate with 0.2% formic acid in acetonitrile of gradient operating condition proved the best for sample dissolution. The method was proven to be repeatable and reproducible. The study ranges covering 80-120% of the tested concentrations of analytes obtained r2 >0.9990. Limits of detection of up to 5ng/ml and recovery of 85-110% were also obtained. The capability of the method was verified using ten real case samples and proficiency testing samples received by Malaysian enforcement laboratory. Keywords: LC-MS-MS, Drugs of Abuse (DOA), Dried Blood Stain (DBS). AN-EV 6
  • 105. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page105 Preliminary Result On Screening Of Pharmaceuticals In Hospital Sungai Buloh Wastewater Treatment Plant Ummi Noor Salhah Masseren* , Tay K.S, Abas M.R.B Environment Research Grant, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya. Abstract Pharmaceuticals pollution in water environment has been a concern not only to human health, but also aquatic organisms. Studies have recently shown that pharmaceutical products at trace levels in water environment including wastewater, surface water, groundwater and more recently drinking water yielded negative effects to environment and human when exposed. A screening analysis was conducted for pharmaceuticals in wastewater treatment plant of Hospital Sungai Buloh, Selangor. The objective was to investigate the potential for pharmaceuticals contamination of treated hospitals wastewater. The samples were taken from two stages of the conventional treatment; influent and effluent. This analytical procedure involved solid-phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). After filtration using glass fibre filter, samples were extracted and subsequently separated into different fractions of acids, bases and neutrals. The separation is important to reduce complexity, which later results in lower matrix effects. This was achieved with separate method, using C18 Bondelut and Oasis HLB SPE cartridge, depends on the type of compound. The determination of pharmaceuticals in wastewater has employed GC separation techniques coupled to MS. The identification of pharmaceuticals is made by spectral interpretation from GC-MS analysis. Targeted pharmaceuticals are selected from the statistic of pharmaceuticals utilization in Malaysia, 2008.From the structure of the compound, the mass is identified and compared in mass spectra of GC-MS analysis results.The following 20 compounds were detected in the wastewater: Acids; Naproxen, Tolfenamic acid, Clofibric acid, Aspirin, Gemfibrozil, Ibuprofen, Ketoprofen, Salicylic acid, Mefanamic acid. Bases; Sotalol, Atenolol, Ciprofloxacin, Ranitidine, Norfloxacin, Acebutolol, Metoprolol. Neutrals; Cotinine, Acetaminophen, Caffeine, Carbamazepine. Keywords: Mixed-mode solid-phase extraction, Pharmaceutical analysis, Influent, Effluent, Hospital wastewater treatment AN-EV 7
  • 106. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page106 Detection of creatinine in urine samples by gold nanoparticles Jarinya Sittiwong, Fuangfa Unob* Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Payathai Road, Bangkok 10330, Thailand *Email: Fuangfa.u@chula.ac.th Abstract A method based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) reaction was proposed for detection of creatinine in human urine samples after extraction on sulfonic acid functionalized silica gel. The parameters affecting the extraction of creatinine by the adsorbent were studied. With the proposed extraction method, the matrix and pH of urine samples showed no interfering effect on creatinie detection. In the presence of creatinine, the aggregation of gold nanoparticles, resulting in a change in the surface plasmon resonance and solution color, was observed and quantitated by a spectrophotometer. The effect of AuNPs concentration and reaction time between AuNPs and creatinine on the determination was investigated. The method provided a determination of creatinine in a range of 15-40 mg L-1 with a detection limit of 13.7 mg L-1 . It was successfully used in the detection of creatinine in human urine samples. Keywords: gold nanoparticles, creatinine, urine samples, surface plasmon resonance AN-EV 8
  • 107. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page107 Chemometric Analysis of Spectroscopic Data on Shape Evolution of Silver Nanoparticles Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide Kanet Wongravee*1 , Tewalak Parnklang1 , Yukihiro Ozaki2 , Chuchaat Thammacharoen1 , Sanong Ekgasit1 1 Sensor Research Unit, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand. .2 Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, Sanda, Hyogo. *Email: kanet.w@chula.ac.th Abstract An alternative approach for synthesizing colloidal silver nanoprisms with controllable localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) via a chemical shape transformation of silver nanosphere induced by H2O2 is proposed. According to the growth mechanism of silver nanoplates, the spectrophotometric method combined with chemometric analysis has potential to reveal the structural evolution process as observed by surface plasmon resonance phenomena. The extinction spectra of the evolving nanostructures were analyzed by factor analysis and error indicator functions. Five major components attributed to the different particle shapes and sizes were theoretically predicted. Furthermore, the concentration profiles and pure spectra of these components were resolved using multivariate curve resolution– alternative least squares (MCR–ALS) analysis. The predicted structural morphologies of each component given by chemometric calculation were in excellent agreement with those observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) images. The procedure was powerful and accurate which exhibits all hidden information without a requirement of extensive laboratory measurements. Because of the simplicity, the low operating cost, and the rapid spectrophotometric measurements, the purposed procedure opens up a new insight to the study of metal nanoparticle evolution. Keywords: Silver nanoprisms, Hydrogen peroxide, Chemometrics AN-EV 9
  • 108. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page108 The Influence of Triton-X on the Evaporation Rate of Methanol- An analysis using Reversed-Flow Gas Chromatography (RF-GC) Methodologies H.H. Mohammad1,* , Khalisanni Khalid1,2 , Kheng Soo Tay1 , Sharifuddin Md. Zain1 , Rashid Atta Khan1 1 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 2 Food and Agricultural Analysis Laboratory Program, Technical Service Centre, Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI), 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia *Corresponding author: enal_fifi@yahoo.com Abstract Reversed-Flow Gas Chromatography (RF-GC) is a relatively new technique to determine the physicochemical properties of solute. So far, RF-GC has been used to determine the diffusion coefficient of various solvents. However, the used of RF-GC in other applications such as environmental studies have not been reported. In this study, RF-GC which is a part of flow- perturbation gas chromatography was used to investigate the rate of evaporation of methanol in the presence surfactant (Triton X-100). Waste methanol is considered as an ignitable hazardous waste by US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) when its concentrations is equal to or greater than 24% in water. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Triton X-100 as non-ionic surfactant to suppress evaporation rate of methanol. The result of this study indicated that the evaporation rate of methanol was found to be retarded by the presence of Triton X-100. The percentage of retardation was found to increase with increasing concentration of Triton X-100. Keywords: evaporation rate, diffusion rate, Reversed-Flow Gas Chromatography (RF-GC) AN-EV 10
  • 109. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page109 Efficient removal of engineered nanoparticles from water using renewable resources Ramakrishna Mallampati, Ong Pin Jin, Suresh Valiyaveettil Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117543. E-mail: chmsv@nus.edu.sg Abstract The increasing use of engineered nanoparticles (NP) in industrial and household applications is expected to lead the contamination of environment. Results from ecotoxicological studies showed that certain NPs induce significant toxicity to living organisms. Unlike, other pollutants, nanomaterials are difficult to remove due to differences in size, shape, composition, charges and stability in water. In this study, we employed biopeels to extract ZnO, TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles from water. The structure of adsorbents was characterized using FESEM, TEM, EDS and XRD. The adsorption capacity of biopeel towards different NPs was investigated with varying contact time intervals. Results showed that biopeels can adsorb nanoparticles efficiently. The adsorption mechanism was investigated based on the surface charge of the pollutants and the functional groups present on the adsorbent. It is expected that such a simple and efficient method can solve the nanotoxicity problem significantly. Acknowledgement: The authors thank the Environment and Water Industry Programme Office (EWI) under the National Research Foundation of Singapore (PUBPP 21100/36/2, NUS WBS no. R-706-002-013-290, R-143-000-458-750, R-143-000-458-731) for the financial support of the work. The authors also thank Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, NUS Environmental Research Institute (NERI) for funding and technical support. AN-EV 11
  • 110. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page110 Multi-residue Analysis of β-Agonists in Tissues by LC-MS/MS Mak Oi Wei1 , Maheswari D/O Paliyanny2 1 Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya 2 Food Additive Laboratory, Department of Chemistry of Malaysia *Email: oiweimak@hotmail.com Abstract We have developed QuEChERS method to determine the presence of different β-agonists’ members in animal tissues by improving the extraction and cleanup, followed by UPLC- MS/MS. β-agonists were originally used in the therapeutic treatment of asthma and emphysema but also misused as a feed addictive to promote leanness of meat and reduce fat. Intake of β-agonists may cause anxiety, hypertension, essential tremor. β-agonists have been banned for use as growth promoters in livestock in Malaysia. So it is necessary to develop highly sensitive QuEChERS method for this analysis. Keywords: QuEChERS, β-agonists, extraction, UPLC-MS/MS Suggested Reading: 1. Juan, C., Igualada, C., Moragues, F., León, N., & Mañes, J. (2010). Development and validation of a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for the analysis of β-agonists in animal feed and drinking water. Journal of Chromatography A, 1217(39), 6061-6068. 2. Lee, M. S. (Ed.). (2012). Mass spectrometry handbook (Vol. 7). Wiley. com. 3. Lehotay, S. J., Collaborators, M. O., Hans, A. V. G. M. C., Gnter, M. V. H. T. A., Mette, L. R. F. K. M., Hammack, E. P. A. B. W., & Parker, A. W. A. (2007). Determination of pesticide residues in foods by acetonitrile extraction and partitioning with magnesium sulfate:collaborative study. Journal of AOAC International, 90(2), 485-520. UP 1
  • 111. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page111 Extraction Of Phytonutrients From Crude Palm Oil And Red Palm Oil Using Ionic Liquid Ong Pei Pei1 and Dr. Ng Mei Han2 1 Department of chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 2 Malaysian Palm Oil Board, No.6, Persiaran Institusi, Bandar Baru Bangi, 43000, Kajang, Selangor, Malaysia. Email: pei_0818@hotmail.com meihan@mpob.gov.my Abstract Ionic liquid can replace organic solvent such as hexane in the extraction of phytonutrients. There is a need to find a substitute for hexane as organic solvent is volatile and can evaporate to atmosphere with detrimental effects on the environment and human health. Ionic liquids in room temperature are highly thermal- and electrochemically stable. They possess negligible vapour pressure, have relatively low viscosity and high density. Thus, it can be used as environmentally friendly media for a range of industrially important chemical processes. Throughout the whole project, the amount of Ionic Liquid used in extraction was varied to obtain the optimum ratio of Ionic liquid needed for successful extraction of phytonutrients from Crude Palm Oil (CPO) and Red Palm Oil (RPO). Vitamin E and Carotene content analysed by using High performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and UV-VIS spectrophotometer. Keywords: Ionic Liquid Suggested Reading: 1. Dupont, J., Consorti, C. S., SUAREZ, P. A., & DE SOUZA, R. F. (2002). Preparation of 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium-based room temperature ionic liquids. Organic syntheses, 79, 236-243. 2. Earle, M. J., & Seddon, K. R. (2000). Ionic liquids. Green solvents for the future. Pure and Applied Chemistry, 72(7), 1391-1398. 3. Ng, M. H., Choo, Y. M., Ma, A. N., Chuah, C. H., & Hashim, M. A. (2004). Separation of vitamin E (tocopherol, tocotrienol, and tocomonoenol) in palm oil. Lipids, 39(10), 1031-1035. UP 2
  • 112. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page112 Alkaloids from Alstonia sp. Su-Han Ng and Toh-Seok Kam Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia *Email: suhan1213@gmail.com Abstract A study of the alkaloidal composition of the leaves of Alstonia penangiana was carried out. A total of 8 alkaloids were obtained, consisting of four pure alkaloids and two unresolvable alkaloid pairs. Structural determination of these alkaloids were based on spectroscopic methods. The alkaloids isolated were vincorine (S1), norvincorine (S2), alstomaline (S3), demethoxyalstonamide (S4), alstonerine (S5) and alstonerinal (S6), alstophylline (S7) and alstophyllal (S8). Keywords: Alstonia penangiana , alkaloids Suggested Reading: 1. Alexander, M. K. An Introduction to the Chemistry of Alkaloids, Page Bros, London. 2. 1970. Hesse, M. Alkalolds: Natures curse or blessing?, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2002. UP 3
  • 113. Abstract -Poster 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page113 Analysis of Compound P, A By-Product of Palm-Based Ester Using HPLC-MWD Sim-Yee Cha1 , Bonnie Yen-Ping Tay2 , and Pei-Meng Woi1 1 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur 2 Quality and Environmental Assessment Unit, Advanced Oleochemical Technology Division, Malaysian Palm Oil Board Email: simyee_90@hotmail.com Abstract The title of the project is the analysis of Compound P, a by-product of palm-based ester using High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Multi-Wavelength Detector (HPLC-MWD). The main objective of the project is method development. A best method to detect Compound P in various cosmetic samples by using HPLC-MWD is needed to be found. We manipulated the HPLC conditions, by changing the column used, solvent ratio, solvent used and flow rate. By screening through different types of cosmetic samples, we analyzed the peak of Compound P by calculating its recovery using external standard as calibration. The project was divided into two parts, each part with different type of columns, to find out which column is better in determining Compound P. For method 1, Chrom Reversed Phase Endcapped 100-4.6mm column was used and for method 2, HG Reversed Phase 250x4mm column was used. UP 4
  • 114. Sponsors 5TH UM-NUS-CU TRILATERAL MINI SYMPOSIUM AND SCIENTIFIC MEETING 2014 11-12 FEBRUARY 2014, UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA, KUALA LUMPUR Page114 SPONSORS DKSH Malaysia Sdn. Bhd. Bumipadu Solution Sdn. Bhd.

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