Building relationships through conversation

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See how the Center for the Advancement of Jewish Education built instructional leadership capacity, embedded instructional coaches in the schools, built a leadership team within each school, and documented student improvement using strategic conversations to build the relationships that have sustained the work beyond its initial two years.

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Building relationships through conversation

  1. 1. Source: Lambert, J. & Mitrani, V. (Winter 2013). Building relationships through trust.Tools for Learning Schools. 16(2), 1-3TitleBodyBuilding relationshipsthrough conversation
  2. 2. Source: Lambert, J. & Mitrani, V. (Winter 2013). Building relationships through trust.Tools for Learning Schools. 16(2), 2Invite schools into conversations about“standards-based, job-embedded, and results-driven professional learning...(to establish) ashared understanding of professional learningaligned with these elements.”Invitations into dialogue
  3. 3. Source: Lambert, J. & Mitrani, V. (Winter 2013). Building relationships through trust.Tools for Learning Schools. 16(2), 2Conversations focused on improving the qualityof teaching and learning require high degreesof trust.Invitations into dialogue
  4. 4. Source: Lambert, J. & Mitrani, V. (Winter 2013). Building relationships through trust.Tools for Learning Schools. 16(2), 2“Well-designed conversations are the buildingblocks to a collaborative culture.”“They create opportunities to examineassumptions, reflect on practice, solveproblems, celebrate successes, and navigate thecomplexities of change.”Well-designed conversations
  5. 5. Source: Lambert, J. & Mitrani, V. (Winter 2013). Building relationships through trust.Tools for Learning Schools. 16(2), 2Prioritize opportunities for“teachers to cometogether to focus on conversations that improvetheir practice and the learning for students.”“These types of conversations must besustained through thoughtful planning,commitment, and clarity of purpose.”Well-designed conversations
  6. 6. Source: Lambert, J. & Mitrani, V. (Winter 2013). Building relationships through trust.Tools for Learning Schools. 16(2), 2What is a well-designed conversation?Purpose: A well-designed conversation has anend in mind — the reason why the teachersare gathering together.Well-designed conversations
  7. 7. Source: Lambert, J. & Mitrani, V. (Winter 2013). Building relationships through trust.Tools for Learning Schools. 16(2), 3Establishing norms is essential in creating trustwithin a diverse community.Example norms• Confidentiality• Equity of voiceDesigning norms for success
  8. 8. Read the full article, with moreinformation, resources, and tools tohelp you implement these ideas inTools for Learning Schools (Winter,2013).Available at www.learningforward.org/publications/tools-for-learning-schools.Download the article andaccompanying toolsInside• Storyboard, p. 4• Thinking lenses, p. 5• Four-step reflection process, p. 6• Success analysis protocol, p. 7Winter 2013Vol. 16, No. 2Your membership in Learning Forward gives you access to a wide rangeof publications, tools, and opportunities to advance professional learning forstudent success. Visit www.learningforward.org to explore more of yourmembership benefits.learNiNg SchoolSToolsforeVery educaTor eNgageS iN eFFecTiVe proFeSSioNal learNiNg eVery day So eVery STudeNT achieVeSBy Julie Lambert andValerie MitraniIn our network of Jewish parochialschools in Miami, inconsistent instruc-tional quality was impacting studentlearning throughout our system. TheCenter for the Advancement of JewishEducation, the central office and techni-cal assistance agency for these schools, de-signed an initiative five years ago to changethe perception of professional learning fromconsidering it a burdensome cost to creatingan understanding that professional learningresources are an investment in student learn-ing. The project successfully built instructionalleadership capacity at the top; embeddedinstructional coaches in the schools to supportimplementation of teacher professional learn-ing into professional practice; built a leadershipteam within each school to shepherd these in-novations; and documented student improve-ment as a result. What has sustained the workbeyond its initial two years, though, are therelationships between professionals within theschools, across schools, and between our agencyand the schools — all developed through stra-tegic conversations.Continued on p. 2Building relationshipsthrough conversation
  9. 9. Learn more withLearn more about professional learning at alllevels of education with Learning Forward, aninternational nonprofit association of learningeducators:www.learningforward.orgMembership in Learning Forward gives youaccess to a wide range of publications, tools,and opportunities to advance professionallearning for student success.

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