1EU Universe AwarenessProgramme EvaluationGuideMOTIVATIONLEGACYAwareness ofthe Universe(Knowledge)ScientificSkillsIntercult...
2This document contains materials to support National Managers (NM)visiting at least one school, to gather evidence for ev...
3EU-UNAWE project goalsEvaluation methodologyFramework for children: Domains of active learning of EU-UNAWEDetailed descri...
4EU-UNAWE project goalsAn evaluation concept of the European Universe Awareness programme (EU-UNAWE)must be strongly linke...
5Evaluation MethodologyThese evaluation materials focus on two key stakeholders: children and teachers.The project goals c...
6Framework for children:Domains of active learning (DAL)of EU-UNAWEUsing the general program goals, it is clear that the c...
7UNAWE Domains of active learning7UNAWE Domains of active learningObjectives EvidenceMotivationEnjoyment,InspirationCurios...
8Objectives EvidenceKnowledge & Understanding Observing, exploring and discovering:1. The Sun, Sun relative position, Sun ...
99Gathering evidence: Process diagramRoute 1 Route 2 Route 3Pre/ Post• you know teacher• Children can writeObserve• you ar...
1010Date............................Location..........................Activitybeingevaluated.................................
1111Date............................Location..........................Activitybeingevaluated.................................
1212Name of observer: ………………………Location: …………………..........Date of observation: ……………………….....Time: ..........................
13Pupil survey (8-10 years)1 What activities have you done in class about space?2 What did you enjoy about this topic?3 Is...
1414Evaluation materialsAstro-Cards classification gamesExercise 1Card game “Astro-Cards”: Identification and classificatio...
15Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 215Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 2Identification of objects belonging to the...
16Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 316Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 3Identification and classification of plane...
17Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 417Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 4Identification and classification of aster...
18Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 518Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 5Identification and classification of nebul...
19Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 619Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 6Identification and classification of galax...
20Quick evaluation: Astro-PosterAnother posibility of performing a quick evaluation is to show children the posterbellow a...
21MOTIVATIONAwareness ofthe Universe(Knowledge)ScientificSkillsInterculturalAttitudesEU UNAWEfosteringLEGACYAstronomy Aware...
22Astronomy Awareness Framework forteachers: Detailed description22Astronomy Awareness Framework forteachers: Detailed des...
23Name: ………………………..................... Date: …………………...........Workshop Location: ……………………….Time: ...........................
24About your pupils8 How did you interpret the activities for your pupils?9 What did they enjoy about the activity?10 Were...
2525Teacher letter/email templateSend to teachers before visitUniverse Awareness Activity observationDear insert teacher n...
2626Parent letter templateSend/email to teachers before visitNB recommend sending a class set to teachersDear parent,Your ...
27Teacher letter templateSend to teachers after visitDear insert teacher name,Thank you very much for allowing me to visit...
28Tracing resources/activity developmentYour name:Your location:Activity title:Audience: Children age�./TeachersNumber of ...
2929Evaluating long term impactWe recognise that long term impact is a question frequently asked in evaluation.Whilst demo...
30Checklist for the evaluation30Checklist for the evaluationTaskDateplanned CompletedTaskDecide which route is suitable fo...
31Astro-CardsMoon - Terresrial - Planets
32Astro-CardsGaseous Planets
33Astro-CardsAsteriods
34Astro-CardsComets
35Astro-CardsSun - Stars - Clusters
36Astro-CardsNebula
37Astro-CardsGalaxies
38Authors: Cecilia Scorza and Grace KimbleCoordination: Pedro RussoDesign and Layout: Charlotte ProvotISBN: 9789491760037w...
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Eu unawe evaluation

  1. 1. 1EU Universe AwarenessProgramme EvaluationGuideMOTIVATIONLEGACYAwareness ofthe Universe(Knowledge)ScientificSkillsInterculturalAttitudesEU UNAWEfostering
  2. 2. 2This document contains materials to support National Managers (NM)visiting at least one school, to gather evidence for evaluation of theEU-UNAWE-Program.There are four main ways proposed for gathering general information:• Observations using an Astronomy Awareness Frameworkevaluation template, for children who are too young towrite• Pre and post visit mind maps/drawings for 7-10 year olds• Quick evaluation with an Astro-poster• By means of a card game where children can identifyobjects and find correlations between themFor the evaluation of the specific activities developed by each EU-UNAWE-partner we propose some playful activities (games).In addition, survey templates linked to the framework are supplied forgathering evidence from teachers, and pupils who are old enough to write.These can be used whether or not NM are able to visit the school.Summary
  3. 3. 3EU-UNAWE project goalsEvaluation methodologyFramework for children: Domains of active learning of EU-UNAWEDetailed description of the domains of active learning (DAL)Evidence of the impact for children according to the DALGathering evidence: process diagramFirst pre/post activity template: Drawing the night skyPre/post activity template alternativeChild observation template: Gathering evidencesPupils surveyEvaluation games: Astro-CardsQuick evaluation: Astro-PosterFramework for teachers: Astronomy Awareness fieldsAstronomy Awareness Framework for teachers. Detailed descriptionTeacher workshop survey plus e-form linkLetter to teachersParent letter and ethical permissionTeacher thank you letter after visitTracing activity developmentEvaluating long term impactsChecklist for the evaluationAstro-Cards45678910111213141920212224252627282931Content
  4. 4. 4EU-UNAWE project goalsAn evaluation concept of the European Universe Awareness programme (EU-UNAWE)must be strongly linked to the general and specific goals of the programme. In resumethese are the following:The Programe is addressed specially to disadvantaged children in different socialenvironments.The program intends to stimulate through images, playful activities,experiments, models and artistic activities the children´s awareness ofastronomical objects and the place of the Earth as part of the Universe in a wayof broadening the children´s view of the world. In doing so try to use daily-life materials in the activities, experiments and models such that children canreproduce them at home.Awaken the awareness of the uniqueness of the Earth and of the need forenvironmental preservation.Motivate children to appreciate other cultures via stories and twinning activitieswith children living in other countries, making them aware of the place in whichother children live, their common cultural features and differences.Throughout stimulate children´s curiosity giving them the occasion and time toformulate their own questions related to the Universe.Develop EUNAWE-contents to be linked to daily school curricula via training ofthe teachers.To achieve these goals the partners of the project have developed diverse materials forteacher training workshops and subsequently children’s class activities.4123456
  5. 5. 5Evaluation MethodologyThese evaluation materials focus on two key stakeholders: children and teachers.The project goals cover a range of domains of learning: motivation, scientific skills, knowledge,and intercultural attitudes. A framework for evaluation specific to UNAWE, ‘AstronomyAwareness’, is proposed as the basis for gathering evidence.Care has been taken to design a research methodology that acknowledges the strengths in amulti-national project and also allows for data from different locations and activities to becombined. Therefore, it is intended that this document supports National Managers (NM) togather evidence with the aim of demonstrating a full range of impacts for teachers and pupils.Gathering evidence about children’s learningThis data collection will require a visit to at least one school. In order that data collection isrealistic, a number of qualitative evidence collection routes are proposed in anticipation thatNational Managers (NM) will select appropriate methods to suit children, capacity, hardwareand activity. It is hoped that NM will use pre/post activity drawings or an observation templatesupplied to gather qualitative information about children’s actions about astronomy. Inaddition, card games, photos, video, recordings, and notes are all admissible as evidence andwill help to build a clear understanding of the activities undertaken throughout the lifetime ofthe project.There is a survey for teachers (with e-form) and an optional follow up survey activity forchildren, suitable for 8-10 year olds. These can also be sent to schools independently of visiting,in order to gather more evidence.National Managers are most welcome to share other examples of evaluation methods.Understanding programme developmentClearly, detailed reflection has been essential to develop both children’s resources andactivities, and teacher workshops. This reflection and improvement process has the potentialto be a rich source of learning for future projects. A paper template and e-form are providedfor National Managers to complete, in order that others can gain insight into programmedevelopment, as a legacy from EU-UNAWE.Gathering evidence from teachersExcellent practice is already taking place around teacher evaluation using quantitative andqualitative questions on survey forms. Based on good examples supplied by NM, questionshave been modified in order that data can be collated and logically correlated with theAstronomy Awareness framework for children’s learning.Paper and e-forms are supplied for dissemination to teachers.Pre -existing evaluation data in different formats is welcome: eval@unawe.orgInstructions show the process for visiting and collecting qualitative evidence from one school.It is expected that this is the minimum, and greater statistical significance will be achieved foryour project if you can visit more schools or use volunteers to assist in gathering more data.
  6. 6. 6Framework for children:Domains of active learning (DAL)of EU-UNAWEUsing the general program goals, it is clear that the concepts underlying UNAWEcover several domains of active learning:The inspiration for assigning domains of learning for UNAWE evaluation is based on Informationfrom the Museums’ Libraries and Archives Framework ‘Inspiring Learning for All’ generic learningoutcomes and Nichols’ framework ‘(2012) Earthsmarts socioecological literacy’.Framework for children:Domains of active learning (DAL)of EU-UNAWEUsing the general program goals, it is clear that the concepts underlying UNAWEcover several domains of active learning:The inspiration for assigning domains of learning for UNAWE evaluation is based on Informationfrom the Museums’ Libraries and Archives Framework ‘Inspiring Learning for All’ generic learningMOTIVATIONAwareness ofthe Universe(Knowledge)ScientificSkillsInterculturalAttitudesEU UNAWEfostering
  7. 7. 7UNAWE Domains of active learning7UNAWE Domains of active learningObjectives EvidenceMotivationEnjoyment,InspirationCuriosityTenacity• Children are doing the tasks withpleasure• Children seem enchanted• Children react with diligence infront of the proposed activities• Children demonstrate attention• Children apply perseverance /tenacity• Children manifest inquisitiveness• Children introduce some complexquestionsDevelop Scientific Thinking & Problem SolvingTechniques; Planning & Conducting InvestigationsObservation, Identification, Classification,Making interconnections, Changing Perspective &CommunicationFrom curriculum: example of school wording of thissectionDiscussing and QuestioningAsk questions which can be answered through aninvestigationUse scientific language regularly in discussionsPlanningPlan and carry out a test to collect evidenceSelect information from a range of resourcesObservingDecide what observations need to be madeSelect appropriate equipment for observation ormeasuring resultsInterpretingDraw conclusions linked to scientific knowledge andunderstanding.Recognise patterns and trends based on the observationor investigationIdeas and EvidenceRecognise that scientific ideas are based on evidencewhich can be verified by observationsUse the imagination together with scientific knowledgeto understand and think about why something happenRecordingDecide on an appropriate method of recordingPresent results using tables, graphs, picturesEvaluationReview the work and reflect on the results• Correct use of vocabulary orgesture to name objects andphenomena observed in sky• Grouping objects/ phenomena toindicate developing understandingof astronomy concepts• Making conjectures available to becontrasted• Developing some experiencesrelated to the hypothesis• Linking new information withexisting conceptions of the sameor different areas• Removing previous points of viewaccording to new inputs• Sharing with others their newknowledgeScientificSkills
  8. 8. 8Objectives EvidenceKnowledge & Understanding Observing, exploring and discovering:1. The Sun, Sun relative position, Sun light(shadows), Day/night cycle, time zones, the seasons,the Moon, the Earth as a planet, awareness of theexistence of water and of the Earth atmosphere andSun light for the development of life on Earth, Solarand Moon eclipses,...2. The Solar system: planets characteristics andmovements, wharf planets, asteroids, comets,...3. The Stars in the night sky, the constellations,orientation, the Life-cycle of stars, the formation ofstars and planets,...4. Our place in the Milky Way, Family of galaxies,...5. Current developments in astronomy6. Magnetic fields (compass, northern lights,...)7. Several complementary questions Valuing different cultural perspective. Recognisingdifferent physical perspectives. Positive attitudetowards astronomy. Valuing inclusive education Working Individually & in Teams • Demonstrating awareness ofdifferent cultures• Ability to observe and explaindifferences in phenomena indifferent countries• Statements of future activity withregards to astronomy• Act on an appropriate way in aframe of diversityDirect observation and/or recordingof naming, first explanations,discussing, drawing, construction,creative responses, movementsand dances, etc. to demonstrateknowledge of one of the featureslisted. leftUniverseKnowledgeInterculturalAttitudes
  9. 9. 99Gathering evidence: Process diagramRoute 1 Route 2 Route 3Pre/ Post• you know teacher• Children can writeObserve• you are notleading activityObserve game• you are leadingmain activitySend teacher permission form, parent letter, arrange visitChildren do preactivity personalmeaning map(PMM)Reproduce evaluationgame from templatePractice observation templateConsider additional evidence: photo, video, drawingActivity Activity ActivityObserve record3 childrenChildren returnto PMM and addnew ideas indifferent colourOptional: supportobservations withchild interviewEval. gameObserve record3 childrenScan in PMM Enter obs. Data into google formSend PMM images/additional info to eval@unawe.orgThank teacher and classAssumptionsAdminPreactivityTeachingactivityPostactivity(straightafter)SubmittingdataAdmin
  10. 10. 1010Date............................Location..........................Activitybeingevaluated........................................Childage..............M/FLanguages:.......................School...................................................................Pretendsitisnight!Drawthesky.Whatdoyousee?Name:Instructions:Childrenaddideasaswritingordrawing,preactivity,usingapencil.Aftertheiractivity,returnandaddnewideasusingaPENorBLUEcolouredpencilPMMPersonalmeaningmaptemplatetophotocopySchool...................................................................
  11. 11. 1111Date............................Location..........................Activitybeingevaluated........................................Childage..............M/FLanguages:.......................School...................................................................PMMPersonalmeaningmaptemplatetophotocopyName:Whatdoyouknowabouttheskyandspace?Haveyougotanyquestions?WriteordrawName:Whatdoyouknowabouttheskyandspace?Haveyougotanyquestions?WriteordrawActivitybeingevaluated........................................School...................................................................Instructions:Childrenaddideasaswritingordrawing,preactivity,usingapencil.Aftertheiractivity,returnandaddnewideasusingaPENorBLUEcolouredpencil
  12. 12. 1212Name of observer: ………………………Location: …………………..........Date of observation: ……………………….....Time: ............................Activity being evaluated:………………………….................................Child age…………….M/F Languages:………………….........................School……………………………..........................................................Child observation template (4-7 years)Tally / score (e.g. III) Total Evidence (e.g. “smiled on seeing moon”MotivationScientificSkillsKnowledgeInternationalAttitudesSubmit information online: http://goo.gl/2eFfWName of observer: ………………………Location: …………………..........Date of observation: ……………………….....Time: ............................Activity being evaluated:………………………….................................Child age…………….M/F Languages:………………….........................School……………………………..........................................................
  13. 13. 13Pupil survey (8-10 years)1 What activities have you done in class about space?2 What did you enjoy about this topic?3 Is there anything you did not like?4 Would you like to find out more about astronomy and space in future?5 Have you got any questions about space?6 If you were going to make a Space Museum or a space display for yourclass, what topics and objects would you put in?Write or draw to explain your plan.Work on the back of this paper.Name: ............................................ Date: ........................................School: .............................................................................................Teacher: ..................................................... Age: .............................
  14. 14. 1414Evaluation materialsAstro-Cards classification gamesExercise 1Card game “Astro-Cards”: Identification and classification game of astronomicalobjects.Age:Materials:Goal:8Card set “Astro-families” (24 cards)Evaluate children´s awareness of the existence ofdifferent astronomical objects and of the place of theEarth among them by asking them just to identify thosethat they know and to name them. In doing so, childrencan group them in families (planets, comets, stars,nebula, constellations, galaxies, etc).Link to Astronomy and scientific skills:Astronomy relies strongly on the observation, identification and posteriorclassification of objects into family classes, and on their location in space atdifferent scales and distances. Observation and classification skills play thereforea key role .
  15. 15. 15Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 215Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 2Identification of objects belonging to the Solar SystemAsk children to identify some objects among the cards belonging to the SolarSystem.Objects belonging to the Solar systemLink to Astronomy and scientific skills:To learn about our cosmic adress and our neighbourhood it is important thatchildren gain a idea of all objects belonging to the Solar System
  16. 16. 16Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 316Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 3Identification and classification of planetsAsk children to identify among the cards the planets , to name them and group theminto solid and gaseous planets according to their distances to the Sun.The solid planets of the Solar SystemGaseous planetsLink to Astronomy and scientific skills:The distinktion between solid (rocky) and gaseous, and their distance to the Sunplanets plays an important role when discussing the habitability of planets. Thereforis this classification fundamental of the discussion about life in the Solar System.Also, the uniqueness of the Earth among the planets can only be understood in thisclassification context.
  17. 17. 17Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 417Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 4Identification and classification of asteriods and cometsAsk children to identify among the cards the asteroids and comets and to discuss abouttheir differences and location in the Solar System.Link to Astronomy and scientific skills:Both asteroids and comets are considered as fossiles objects of the Solar System andare connected to ist formation history. Planets formed in the past from the collisionsof hundred of thousands of asteroids which had in turn formed out from dust grainsof the protoplanetary disc sorrounding the Sun. Comets are icy objects that, when closeenough to the Sun, displays a visible coma (a thin temporary atmosphere) and a tail. Itis thought that the Earth water came from lots of comets impacting its surface.
  18. 18. 18Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 518Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 5Identification and classification of nebula and star clustersAsk children to identify among the cards the nebula (birth place of stars) and the openand globular star clusters.
  19. 19. 19Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 619Astro-cards evaluation gamesExercise 6Identification and classification of galaxies, galaxy familiesand galaxy clusters
  20. 20. 20Quick evaluation: Astro-PosterAnother posibility of performing a quick evaluation is to show children the posterbellow and ask them to identify as many objects as possible. In doing so they coulddescribe their size and location (e.g. within the Milky Way, outside the Milky Way).
  21. 21. 21MOTIVATIONAwareness ofthe Universe(Knowledge)ScientificSkillsInterculturalAttitudesEU UNAWEfosteringLEGACYAstronomy Awareness Frameworkfor teachersTeacher additional area for impact: LegacyTeachers gain subject knowledge for teaching their pupils in the domains previouslyexplained. In addition there is potential for the impact of the project to be multipliedthrough:• Teachers disseminating knowledge• Teachers critically appraising resources and activities, in order to makerecommendations for future projects• Embedding astronomy activities into curriculum
  22. 22. 22Astronomy Awareness Framework forteachers: Detailed description22Astronomy Awareness Framework forteachers: Detailed descriptionDefinitionMotivationScientificSkillsKnowledgeInterculturalAttitudesLegacy1. Enjoyment2. Inspiration3. Creativity4. Persistence1. Curiosity2. Observation3. Identification4. Classification5. Making interconnections6. Changing perspective7. CommunicationObserving, exploring  and discovering:1. The Sun, Sun light (shadows), Day/night cycle, the seasons, the Moon, the Earthas a planet, awareness of the existence of water and of the Earth atmosphere andSun light for the development of life on Earth, Solar and Moon eclipses.2. The Solar system: planets characteristics and movements, wharf planets,asteroids, comets.3. The Stars in the night sky, the constellations, the life-cycle of stars, the formationof stars and planets4. Our place in the Milky Way, Family of galaxies5. Current developments in astronomy1. Valuing different cultural perspectives2. Positive attitudes towards astronomy1. Disseminating knowledge to other teachers2. Recommendations for improvements3. Embedding new materials in curriculumMotivation1. Curiosity7. CommunicationObserving, exploring  and discovering:Observing, exploring  and discovering:InterculturalCurrent developments in astronomy1. Valuing different cultural perspectivesInterculturalDisseminating knowledge to other teachers
  23. 23. 23Name: ………………………..................... Date: …………………...........Workshop Location: ……………………….Time: ...............................Date of teacher workshop:…………………………..............................Age of class taught: …………….School name: ................................School adress:………………….........................................................Your email adress: .....................................................................School…………………………….........................................................Teacher workshop survey (page 1/2)We would prefer that this is completed online at: http://goo.gl/XejyPAbout you1 What did you enjoy about the course?2 Did you gain knowledge about the universe? Please explain.3 Did you develop any new skills or practice existing skills?4 Did the course make you consider cultural perspectives differently?5 Did you share aspects of this course with other staff? How?6 Have you got any recommendations for improvements to your course?7Have you embedded any new materials into the curriculum as a result of this course?Name: ………………………..................... Date: …………………...........Workshop Location: ……………………….Time: ...............................Date of teacher workshop:…………………………..............................Age of class taught: …………….School name: ................................School adress:………………….........................................................Your email adress: .....................................................................School…………………………….........................................................
  24. 24. 24About your pupils8 How did you interpret the activities for your pupils?9 What did they enjoy about the activity?10 Were there any constraints to implementing the activity?11 What do you think your pupils learnt?12 Did they have the opportunity to try out any new skills?13 Did they have opportunities for cultural learning?14Which aspects of curriculum assessment did the activities address?15Please rate the UNAWE resources out of 10,(10= excellent):16How could future projects support opportunities for children to be involved in astronomy?Any other comments?Teacher workshop survey (page 2/2)
  25. 25. 2525Teacher letter/email templateSend to teachers before visitUniverse Awareness Activity observationDear insert teacher name,Thank you for taking the opportunity to attend the recent Teacher training course on<insert date>.I am looking forward to your class participating in activities which aim to increase theirunderstanding and excitement about astronomy.As part of the programme, and to allow it to continue free of charge, UNAWE are obligedto gather information about the activities and how children respond to them.I hope you do not mind me contacting you to request assistance. I have chosen yourschool because <insert specific reasons here >II would like to ask permission to visit you for an evaluation activity. I do not anticipatethat this would detract from your normal class activities,. I hope to gather evidenceabout children’s learning in the form of a short activity and some observations. Thesemay also be useful for teacher assessment. I would also like to find out your opinionsabout implementing the activities.If you are happy for this activity to take place, I would be grateful if you could circulatethe letters attached to parents; I would like to collect them when I visit.Here are some dates which might be suitable for a visit:<Dates>If none of these suit you then please let me know good alternatives.Please feel free to contact me by email: <email address> or phone <number> at aconvenient time to check times and dates.With best wishes and thanks for your support,National Manager nameNational Manager <insert location>UNAWEwww.unawe.org
  26. 26. 2626Parent letter templateSend/email to teachers before visitNB recommend sending a class set to teachersDear parent,Your son/daughter’s teacher <insert name> has recently taken part in a workshop aiming toincrease children’s understanding and excitement about astronomy.Owing to your teacher’s enthusiasm for astronomy, we have chosen your child’s class for a followup visit, so that we can see activities taking place in the classroom.As part of the programme, and to allow it to continue free of charge, Universe Awareness areobliged to gather information about the activities and how children respond to them.I would like to ask permission to gather information in different ways. I would be grateful ifyou could indicate on the attached form whether you are happy for anonymous evidence to begathered as shown below.If you have noticed your child speaking about astronomy topics recently, I would be veryinterested to hear about it. <email here> if you have any questions please do not hesitate tocontact me:With best wishes and thanks for your support,National Manager nameNational Manager <insert location>UNAWEwww.unawe.org26Name of child / childrenSchoolYour nameWe would like to gather evidence about UNAWE children’s astronomy programme. This may be used incommunicating the benefits of the trip; for example in may go on a website for researchers, educators,parents or teachers to look at. It may be used to persuade other organisations to run a similar project,which may involve press coverage. Children will not be identified by name.Please indicate if you are happy for evidence (photo/video/microphone/written) to be gathered.We will not use the images taken, or any other information you provide, for any other purpose.Contact details will only be used to communicate with you, and all conditions of the Data ProtectionAct 1998 will be adhered to.I give permission for my son/daughter to take part in the ‘Universe Awareness’ school activity duringclass time, at school, and for evidence to be collected as indicated above.Signed: Data:SchoolYour nameYour nameWe would like to gather evidence about UNAWE children’s astronomy programme. This may be used inI give permission for my son/daughter to take part in the ‘Universe Awareness’ school activity during
  27. 27. 27Teacher letter templateSend to teachers after visitDear insert teacher name,Thank you very much for allowing me to visit on <insert date here>.I would like to thank you and the class for making me feel welcome, and forfacilitating collection of vital evidence about learning. This data will be used toimprove the programme, and also to develop future Programmes.In case you have not yet completed the online survey, here is the address:http://goo.gl/XejyPChildren’s opinions are of key importance and likeiwise, I am keen to see thechildren’s opinions from their survey activity. (NB delete if children are under8)The results will be made available in a full report towards the end of 2013, andif you would like a copy please send your contact details to eval@unawe.orgIf you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact me:<insertemail here>National Manager nameNational Manager <insert location>UNAWEwww.unawe.org
  28. 28. 28Tracing resources/activity developmentYour name:Your location:Activity title:Audience: Children age�./TeachersNumber of participantsActivity type: Festival, workshop, game, lesson, drop in, outreach, otherWhere did it take place?Date of activityTime of activityHow did you develop this resource? (conception and delivery)Image file nameIn order to better understand your programme development process, we wouldlike to ask you to reflect on and complete the following information online. Pleasecomplete one form per activity including teacher workshop activities you havedeveloped.Information can be brief.We would prefer that this is completed online at: http://goo.gl/yJQY5(Please send an image of the programme to eval@unawe.org)1234567891011Here are the questions:
  29. 29. 2929Evaluating long term impactWe recognise that long term impact is a question frequently asked in evaluation.Whilst demonstrating long term impact was not stated as an evaluation outcomein this EU proposal, if you wish to gather supporting information then it would bepossible using the following interview methodology:Search records for a class that you can still contact, who have takenpart in previous UNAWE activities.Contact a teacher at the school and request an interview with a groupof pupils.Use the following questions for a semi-structured interview (Thismeans encourage conversation around the four key questions). :• Record age, date, name, school and year of UNAWEparticipation.• On a scale of 1-10, where 1= dislike and 10 = like very much,how do you feel about astronomy?Discuss responses with the group.• If you were planning to teach younger children aboutastronomy, what would you like to tell them about?• Do you ever observe the night sky?• Do you think you will use what you know about astronomy infuture?In addition, it is then necessary to find a control group of pupils thesame age, who have not taken part in UNAWE activities.If you submit notes about interviews with both groups, these can beincluded, correlated with the Astronomy Awareness framework, aspart of the final report.There is a google form here to submit information.Interviewing to assess long term impact123
  30. 30. 30Checklist for the evaluation30Checklist for the evaluationTaskDateplanned CompletedTaskDecide which route is suitable for youIdentify school (s) to observeSend teacher letters together with parent informationSet observation datesProduce evaluation game using templatePractice observation scheduleConsider video recording or sound/photos as additionalmaterialAgree activity, timing and pupils to observe with teacher.You may need to explain evaluation game or pre visitmaterials.Discuss photography and video with teacherPhotocopy PMMPhotocopy teacher surveyPhotocopy pupil survey if pupils are over 8Recharge digital camera/dictaphoneTake game/PMM/observation sheets/ teacher survey/pupilsurvey to school, together with any recording hardwareRoute 1: Pre visit PMMRoute 2: Observe activity and record 3 pupils minimumRoute 1: Post visit PMM OR Route 3: post visit evaluationgame plus observationsGive teacher survey and pupil surveyCollect teacher survey (if not eform), pupil surveys andparent permission formsRoute 1: scan in PMMsRoute 2 and 3: submit observation dataDownload and email any supporting video/photo/drawingevidenceThank teacher and classTaskDecide which route is suitable for youDecide which route is suitable for youIdentify school (s) to observeIdentify school (s) to observeSend teacher letters together with parent informationSend teacher letters together with parent informationSet observation datesSet observation datesProduce evaluation game using templateProduce evaluation game using templatePractice observation schedulePractice observation scheduleConsider video recording or sound/photos as additionalmaterialAgree activity, timing and pupils to observe with teacher.Discuss photography and video with teacherPhotocopy PMMPhotocopy PMMPhotocopy teacher surveyPhotocopy teacher surveyPhotocopy pupil survey if pupils are over 8Photocopy pupil survey if pupils are over 8Recharge digital camera/dictaphoneRecharge digital camera/dictaphoneTake game/PMM/observation sheets/ teacher survey/pupilsurvey to school, together with any recording hardwareRoute 1: Pre visit PMMRoute 1: Pre visit PMMRoute 2: Observe activity and record 3 pupils minimumRoute 2: Observe activity and record 3 pupils minimumRoute 1: Post visit PMM OR Route 3: post visit evaluationgame plus observationsGive teacher survey and pupil surveyGive teacher survey and pupil surveyCollect teacher survey (if not eform), pupil surveys andparent permission formsRoute 1: scan in PMMsRoute 1: scan in PMMsRoute 2 and 3: submit observation dataRoute 2 and 3: submit observation dataDownload and email any supporting video/photo/drawingevidenceThank teacher and classplanned
  31. 31. 31Astro-CardsMoon - Terresrial - Planets
  32. 32. 32Astro-CardsGaseous Planets
  33. 33. 33Astro-CardsAsteriods
  34. 34. 34Astro-CardsComets
  35. 35. 35Astro-CardsSun - Stars - Clusters
  36. 36. 36Astro-CardsNebula
  37. 37. 37Astro-CardsGalaxies
  38. 38. 38Authors: Cecilia Scorza and Grace KimbleCoordination: Pedro RussoDesign and Layout: Charlotte ProvotISBN: 9789491760037www.eu-unawe.org

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