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Ipsos MORI: Walk a mile in their shoes:

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14 May 2012: Sarah Castell and Jayesh Navin Shah presented at the British Science Association's Science Communication Conference in 2011

14 May 2012: Sarah Castell and Jayesh Navin Shah presented at the British Science Association's Science Communication Conference in 2011

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  • 1. Version 1 | PublicWalk a mile in their shoes:engaging different segmentsSarah Castell and Jayesh Navin Shah May 2012© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
  • 2. Some background• Last year, we presented findings from the Public Attitudes to Science (PAS) 2011 study• The study included a quantitative segmentation, grouping together members of the public that tend to have similar attitudes to science• Last year’s session offered a brief description of the six segments, among other PAS 2011 findings• Delegates wanted a more thorough exploration of how they might tailor engagement activities to these six segments© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
  • 3. Three things for today1. In-depth presentation of the six segments, and potential approaches for engaging them • c.20-minute presentation • c.3-minute vox pops video2. Generate ideas for how to overcome your own science communication challenges3. Discuss how to detect the impact of engagement activities among specific segments© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
  • 4. What do we mean by “segments”? Based on a quantitative segmentation model, so … Tendencies rather than certainties when grouping people Previous PAS studies have consistently Our interpretations of an identified similar objective statistical analysis segments, so these are enduring groups in the UK public … Segments have overall defining characteristics, but … so how do we use this a range of views in each segmentation?© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
  • 5. The six segmentsWho are they and what are their views?© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
  • 6. We know how interested and engaged they are in science … informed about science (net score) Confident Engagers Distrustful Engagers Late Adopters Potential low- hanging fruit agree it‟s The Indifferent important to know about science in daily The Concerned lives (net score) Hardest to engage Disengaged Sceptics … but we need to know moreBase: 2,103 UK adults aged 16+Fieldwork dates: 11 October-19 December 2010© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
  • 7. Confident Engagers are strongly positive about the role ofscience in society, and already feel sufficiently engaged “Yes [psychology is a science]. Because of things like Pavlov‟s experiments, you can show how things work by methods.” PAS 2011 participant Tend to be affluent (ABC1s), have a higher education and aged 35-44• Were enthusiastic about science at school• Relatively close proximity to science in their lives, either through work, or friends and family• Often go to all sorts of museums, galleries and festivals More likely to read broadsheets, use• Sceptical about health and science claims made in social media and adverts and in the media read science blogs© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
  • 8. Distrustful Engagers think science benefits society, but are lesstrusting of scientists and less confident of regulation “Unfortunately, there are so many things which come up in media where things have been handled wrongly. I think the NHS is in a bit of a mess, so I would not fully trust that everything would be used in the correct way.” Tend to be men, generally without children, affluent HTA stakeholder evaluation (2007) (ABC1s), with a higher education, and aged 55+• More cynical about the intentions of private companies and government, and think the public should have more say• Tend to think of scientists as introverts, working behind closed doors Tend to read right-leaning• Often sports fans, more likely to attend live newspapers, but also more likely sports events to read science magazines© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
  • 9. Late Adopters did not enjoy science at school, but now take astrong interest, based on environmental and ethical concerns “[Carbon Dioxide Removal options] are natural processes, so less likely to have unintended consequences on ecosystems.” Tend to be women, often parents generally young, Experiment Earth (2010) aged 16-34, many with an arts or humanities background• Take a broad view of what constitutes science (e.g. CSI as a science-based show)• Engage with news stories and activities that relate back to their environmental and ethical concerns (e.g. going to the zoo)• Would like to hear more scientists discuss the More likely to download or stream social and ethical implications of their work programmes or video clips, and to visit social networking websites© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
  • 10. The Concerned distinguish themselves through a more religiousor spiritual outlook on life, which informs their views on science “It shouldn‟t be done because once you start you can‟t stop or control it … The consequences would leak out somewhere.” More likely to be women, from younger age groups Public dialogue into Animals aged 16-34, less affluent Containing Human Materials (C2DEs) and from ethnic (2010) minority backgrounds• Often less convinced about established science (e.g. on climate change or vaccination)• Not sure what the economic benefits of science are• Think religion and faith should play a stronger More likely to read role in society than they currently do tabloids, and less likely to read any• Tend to have faith that the government is Sunday newspaper generally doing the right thing© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
  • 11. The Indifferent do not feel informed about science, but are notespecially interested or concerned either “You always hear these things without always knowing what they are. It‟s „medical‟, but that‟s about as far as I‟ve actually thought about it. It‟s like „cells‟, you often read things without fully understanding what it is anyway.” Tend to be older people HTA stakeholder evaluation (2007) and retired, often less affluent (C2DEs)• Generally tend not to be interested in new challenges or learning new skills• Generally don‟t go to museums or galleries• Are put off by technical terms and jargon Least likely to have internet access, so television and• Don‟t think there is much they can change newspapers are important, with the way things are run especially tabloids© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
  • 12. Disengaged Sceptics were put off science at school, and todaythey find it overwhelming “It‟s no use talking to us about CO2 emissions and expecting us to change our behaviour instantly. A tonne of carbon, what does that even look like! I want to know what‟s going to More likely to be happen around here.” women, less affluent (C2DEs), and with no The Big Energy Shift (2009) formal qualifications• Think things like science and the economy are too complex for them to understand• Take a conservative attitude towards science and health regulation• Don’t want personal involvement, but want to More likely to read know the Government is listening to the public tabloids, and less• But will engage with news stories if there is a non- likely to have science narrative that interests them internet access© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
  • 13. So do these groups of people really exist?• This short video was taken with members of the general public who attended our PAS discussion groups in London in February 2011 To view this video, please go to the BIS YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com/user/bis govuk#p/a/u/0/DW61a3ni4Xc© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
  • 14. But remember, people don‟t travel around as segments! More likely than average to attend a science-related activity (e.g. science museum) with … Distrustful Engager, Indifferent, tend not to alone do science activities Late Adopter, with son or daughter The Concerned, with friends Disengaged Sceptic, no tendencies Confident Engager, alone or with friends© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
  • 15. Some of our ideas on how you might engage these groups Dispel myths about CONFIDENT ENGAGERS scientists – show they work in teams and have to be creative DISTRUSTFUL ENGAGERS LATE ADOPTERS Not just about the “science” – some may respond more to the THE CONCERNED social and ethical implications (e.g. of climate change) THE INDIFFERENT the intentions of What are scientists in areas such as stem cell research, and how will this benefit people? DISENGAGED SCEPTICS© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
  • 16. Some of our ideas on how you might engage these groups CONFIDENT ENGAGERS DISTRUSTFUL ENGAGERS segment be Could this science ambassadors to the other segments? LATE ADOPTERS “Before, science was the Bunsen Burner, nothing else, and then I thought, Demystifying science – THE CONCERNED it‟s everything – anyone can do science gardening, food, glasses!” PAS 2011 participant THE INDIFFERENT Both these segments respond best when science isn‟t isolated, but a part of culture, and related to the things they DISENGAGED SCEPTICS do in their daily lives© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
  • 17. Version 1 | PublicThanks and now for your ideas!sarah.castell@ipsos.comjayesh.shah@ipsos.com© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
  • 18. In your breakout groups …1. Familiarise yourself with the segment on your table2. Share your communications challenge with others on your table3. Group discussions • What in life really matters to this segment? • How can you use the things that matter to involve them with your issue? • How would you use media channels, messages, events, activities, within your budget? • What does success look like? What will the segment do or think differently as a result of your action? • Prepare to present back your top three insights to the group© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Public
  • 19. Distrustful Engagers – what do they think of science? % All UK adults aged 16+ agreeing School put me off science % Distrustful Engagers agreeing Public consultation events are just public relations It is important to know about events and don‟t make any 85% science in my daily life difference to policy 71% 67% 51% 24%In general, scientists want to 88% On the whole, science will make life better for the 82% make our lives easier average person 72% 12% 80% 40% 37% The speed of development in 50% 58% science and technology 54% 49% The science I learnt at school means they cannot properly has been useful in my job be controlled by government 63% 59% Rules will not stop scientists Finding out about new doing what they want behind scientific developments is closed doors easy these daysBases: 2,103 UK adults aged 16+; 260 Distrustful EngagersFieldwork dates: 11 October-19 December 2010© Ipsos MORI Version 2 | Public
  • 20. Distrustful Engagers – what kinds of things would they say? “I‟m sometimes sceptical of “Unfortunately, there are so many peer review. Don‟t we tend to things which come up in media look after our own? Sometimes where things have been handled we‟re very critical, but doctors wrongly. I think the NHS is in a bit tend to be a closed circle and if of a mess, so I would not fully trust one makes an error they … that everything would be used in cover up and protect their own.” the correct way.” Public Attitudes to Science 2011 HTA stakeholder evaluation (2007) “As far as Im concerned, “In the current political [my medical information] is climate is your research stored in a general office biased in favour of area, accessible by every things to support single member of staff who climate change?” works in the surgery.” Experiment Earth (2010) Use of Medical Records in Medical Research (2006)© Ipsos MORI Version 2 | Public
  • 21. Late Adopters – what do they think of science? % All UK adults aged 16+ agreeing School put me off science % Late Adopters agreeing Human activity does have a The science I learnt at school significant effect on the has not been useful in my climate everyday life 91% 74% 40% 52% 24% 36% 44% Scientists should be 68% 68% 77% rewarded for communicating It is important to know about their work to the public science in my daily life 65% 82% I want scientists to spend 81% 86%Science is such a big part of more time discussing the our lives that we should all social and ethical take an interest implications of their workBases: 2,103 UK adults aged 16+; 392 Late AdoptersFieldwork dates: 11 October-19 December 2010© Ipsos MORI Version 2 | Public
  • 22. Late Adopters – what kinds of things would they say? “Science and the arts “[Carbon Dioxide Removal are both creative in options] are natural different ways. processes, so less likely to Leonardo da Vinci did have unintended science and arts.” consequences on Public Attitudes to ecosystems.” Science 2011 Experiment Earth (2010) “A human would express “With the weather in our pain in an experiment. Why own country, the tsunami, should an animal go in Chile and the amount of through what a human isn‟t pollution in China, we prepared to go through?” know something is Animals Containing Human happening.” Materials dialogue (2010) Experiment Earth (2010)© Ipsos MORI Version 2 | Public
  • 23. The Concerned – what do they think of science? % All UK adults aged 16+ agreeing Human beings have evolved % Concerned agreeing from other animals Government funding for 68% science should be cut We depend too much on because the money can be science and not enough on 52% faith better spent elsewhere 45% 25%Scientists should listen more 74% 29% The more I know about science, the more worried Ito what ordinary people think am 66% 15% 33% 24% 41% Scientists seem to be trying 47% 62% new things without stopping 40% Jobs in science are very to think about the 68% interesting consequences 56% 48% The speed of development in 71% science and technology People shouldn‟t tamper with means they cannot properly nature be controlled by governmentBases: 2,103 UK adults aged 16+; 490 ConcernedFieldwork dates: 11 October-19 December 2010© Ipsos MORI Version 2 | Public
  • 24. The Concerned – what kinds of things would they say? “Technology makes people “The risks are exploitation, lose jobs. Machinery is manipulation, it being used for more efficient, so you don‟t the wrong purposes, but we‟re need people, so you have always seeing the goalposts, job cuts.” or the line of what‟s acceptable, being pushed Public Attitudes to Science further and further.” 2011 HTA stakeholder evaluation (2007) “It shouldn‟t be done because once you start you can‟t stop or control it … The “Half the world is starving – consequences would leak all this should be out somewhere.” addressed before we take this further.” Animals Containing Human Materials dialogue (2010) Animals Containing Human Materials dialogue (2010)© Ipsos MORI Version 2 | Public
  • 25. The Indifferent – what do they think of science? % All UK adults aged 16+ agreeing I enjoy new situations and % Indifferent agreeing challenges Public consultation events 81% are just public relations 89%It ison learningfor me to keep important events and don‟t make any new skills difference to policy 61% 48% 63% I don‟t think I‟m clever 51% enough to understand it is important to know about science and technology 46% 68% science in my daily life 32% 40% 25% 33% 77% 46% It‟s normal for scientists to Science is such a big part of 84% our lives that we should all disagree take an interest 63% 57% 71% Science and technology are The UK is too small to make too specialised for most an impact on climate change people to understand themBases: 2,103 UK adults aged 16+; 389 IndifferentFieldwork dates: 11 October-19 December 2010© Ipsos MORI Version 2 | Public
  • 26. The Indifferent – what kinds of things would they say? “I only know what‟s presented to me. Maybe TV “You always hear these things advertisements or magazines – without always knowing what they things that we look at … are. It‟s „medical‟, but that‟s about [Science] is the part of the as far as I‟ve actually thought about newspaper that we skip it. It‟s like „cells‟, you often read normally.” things without fully understanding what it is anyway.” Public Attitudes to Science 2011 HTA stakeholder evaluation (2007) “It‟s difficult to know “That nanotechnology what we can do [to stuff, the vivisection, I mitigate climate change] don‟t understand that. It‟s in our little way.” so confusing, all these atoms and molecules.” Experiment Earth (2010) Public Attitudes to Science 2011© Ipsos MORI Version 2 | Public
  • 27. Disengaged Sceptics – what do they think of science? % All UK adults aged 16+ agreeing I dont think Im clever enough to understand % Disengaged Sceptics agreeing science and technology Public consultation events I cannot follow developments are just public relations in science and technology events and don‟t make any 82% because the speed of difference to policy 58% development is too fast 72% 32% 43% Government should delay There is so much conflicting new medicines or 90% information about science it technologies until scientists 79% is difficult to know what to are completely certain there 73% believe are no bad side effects 22% 71% 54% 40% 81% Rules will not stop scientists 70% I enjoy new situations and doing what they want behind challenges closed doors 92% 49% 89% The speed of development in science and technology 96% It is important for me to keep means they cannot properly on learning new skills be controlled by GovernmentBases: 2,103 UK adults aged 16+; 269 Disengaged ScepticsFieldwork dates: 11 October-19 December 2010© Ipsos MORI Version 2 | Public
  • 28. Disengaged Sceptics – what kinds of things would they say? “It was quite interesting to have taken part in something like this, “It‟s no use talking to us about especially if you‟ve got a CO2 emissions and expecting background where you don‟t know us to change our behaviour much about science. It‟s made me instantly. A tonne of carbon, more aware of … the world that‟s what does that even look like! I behind the scenes working on want to know what‟s going to curing diseases.” happen around here.” Animals Containing Human The Big Energy Shift (2009) Materials dialogue (2010) “The graph showed 100 “I wouldn‟t have parts per million in 200 connected science years, and a 1°C increase in to all these areas.” temperature. How will it Public Attitudes to affect us? Should we really Science 2011 be concerned about 2°C?” Experiment Earth (2010)© Ipsos MORI Version 2 | Public