divided families history table 02
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divided families history table 02 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. As the D.P.R.K. (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea or North Korea) outpaces South Korea (R.O.K. or Republic of Korea) in economic development, it calls for economic and cultural exchangeswith the South, including proposals regarding divided families.
  • 2. South Koreabegins to catch up to the D.P.R.K. in economic development.
  • 3. Red Cross talks regarding divided families end without agreement.
  • 4. Koreans begin immigrating to the United States in largenumbers, becoming one of the top five countries of origin ofimmigrants to the United States. After the passage of theImmigration and Nationality Act of 1965, abolishing quotas on thenumber of Asians allowed to enter the United States.
  • 5. KBS (KoreanBroadcasting System)hosts a ‘Campaign toReunite Ten MillionDividedFamilies’ telethonthat attracts millionslooking for theirdivided families, butsadly only within SouthKorea,due to the D.P.R.K.’snon-participation.Still, after the 95minute program wasextended to 453 hoursand 45 minutes due tooverwhelmingresponse, 10,000 out of109,000 applicantswere reunited.
  • 6. Choong Lim Chun, a Canadian,begins to reunite divided families,including Korean Americans,after receiving a letter and pictureof his older sister in 1979 from asecurity guard for North Korea’sOlympic team, while working as areporter for the New Korea Times.Although Korean Americans initiatecontact, North Koreans seek theirrelatives as well by advertising inNorth Korean media and later,applying to meet them. After hisdeath in 1995, his wife Soon Youngcontinues his work.
  • 7. Three “Golden Years”: Korean Americans, e.g. Soo GyungLim, publicly advocate for reunification and reunions. Travel tothe North is abundant.
  • 8. “Dark Times”:North Korea endsKoreanAmerican visitsdue to complaintsfrom its generalpopulace aboutpreferentialtreatment given tothe familymembers of KoreanAmericans.