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Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System
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Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System

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A paper prepared for presentation at the ISG 7th World Conference in vancouver 2010. The paper presented issues uncovered in early stages of the research being undertaken by the Smart Clothes and …

A paper prepared for presentation at the ISG 7th World Conference in vancouver 2010. The paper presented issues uncovered in early stages of the research being undertaken by the Smart Clothes and Wearable Technology research centre at the University of Wales Newport as part of the New Dynamics of Ageing - Design for Ageing Well Project

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  • The numbers of over 60’s are predicted to double to around 30% over the next 2 decades Recognised by ‘high street’ market-leaders as key to their future market-share
  • Examples of some of the innovations within their life time; Space travel / moon landing 1969 Stretch fabrics used for intimate apparel and skiwear from 1959 Motorsports clothing evolved from “normal” to highly sophisticated Active clothing used to be ‘old’ clothing – now sophisticated and linked to branding and sponsorship Unfortunately, to date much of the wearable technology has been in the form of ugly medical devices – two pics on the bottom right of slide!
  • This project brings together a cross-disciplinary team of researchers from UK universities led by the University of Wales Newport. Work packages: Behaviour – what will older users willingly wear and find usable (Westminster / Salford) Clothing – the application of modern function textiles in a clothing layering system (Newport / University of Brighton) Technology – what wearable technologies can enhance autonomy and independence (University of Ulster) Within that context we are bringing together the different research methodologies / research ‘ doorways’ Behaviour – user-needs driven Design – iterative / experimental Technology – data driven Boris – please Say what you feel most comfortable with – the illustration tries to convey the overall methodology of the project in one image!
  • There is a danger that developments become both problem focused and technology led The alternative perspective - innovations in design and technology should be led by the aspirations, desires and everyday needs of the end-user This project is centred on meaningful engagement with users from identification of end-user needs through to co-design with users and the eventual verification of working prototypes Jane McCann’s tree of requirements is based on form and function as a tool to aid designers and the development team helps to explain what we are trying to do within the project in terms of the research definition. Through cross-disciplinary design-led collaboration with expertise in: behaviour and care of older people textile and clothing design & garment engineering Information Communications Technology with wider implications for the smart environment Trying to open new doorways for research – create a new shared language in research of collaborative user needs driven design
  • User group event led by Salford with users at Newport Constituted the initial training for the research team in how to run a user-group session. We have run three such sessions so far in the project. Slide Illustrates part of our approach to gathering of hands on Qualitative information
  • Taking a user to a sporting goods trade event in Germany provided good immediate feedback for both researchers and the industry partners. User highlighted several key issues with the design and functionality of garments. Issues with: Zippers Cuffs Hoods Internal fastenings Female “older” user also had issues with the fit of woman's clothing, preferred men's clothing for fit, but had problems then with arm length etc Point of Sale display often didn’t show the full functionality to best advantage. Again this Illustrates part of our approach to gathering of hands on Qualitative information.
  • Boris – over to you! To be fleshed out in your own paper (Janes Note!) Daves Notes…. But my idea here was that we are drawing together Qualitative data (from hands on user interaction at workshops and trade shows etc – as per the previous two slides), and combining with well thought through quantitative data from the behavioural study to create what I have called: “ sophisticated empirical data outputs and extensive experiential based knowledge ”
  • Brief intro to the layering system; Base layer: Closest to body: base layer- needs to wick away moisture from the body / move with the body / etc. Sophisticated second skin seam free engineered knit garments – Often NOT suitable for older and often larger figure types! Mid layer: Mid layer provides variable degrees of insulation – fibres and fabrics that trap still air – ie; knit and fleece constructions, feathers / down etc. Outer Layer - Hard Shell: Smart in relation to textiles can refer to its breathability and wicking properties. Light weight and compact but not designed for older users! The way in which the garment is constructed can also give it smart attributes: the use of inverted zips to improve water and wind resistance has become popular of the last few years. There use of bonding and welding technologies to ensure watertight seams. There is now also the incorporation of electronic technologies into clothing.
  • Soft shell garment – relatively recent developments – rain resistant as opposed to waterproof, can help to remove the need to carry a full “waterproof” as the weather is actually very rarely so bad that a full hard shell is needed. Softer and more comfortable but not currently designed for older people – mainly used in the extreme end of outdoor activities and sports. Concentrates on keeping the wearer “comfortable” rather than trying to always keep the weather out. Personal protection (here for skaters) can often be better designed than the average hip protector!
  • Little has been done to address the technical and aesthetic design requirements of older wearers with regard to human physiology in terms of: Sizing, fit, shape, predominant posture. Thermal regulation Moisture management Protection Psychological ‘feel good factor’. Recent ‘Size UK’ survey provides little reference for the older user body size
  • Beginning the clothing development – pattern cutting driven by the findings of the body scanning. Cutting for movement – not normally found in text books
  • Wearable technologies should Enhance the clothing layering system Wearable technologies currently found within garments for performance sport for the youth market Vital signs monitoring and medication reminders, as required. The self-monitoring of fitness provides personal comparison of performance, such as distance, speed, duration, repetition of movements, posture etc. Examples of garments with textile-based sensors – Currently NOT designed for older wearers! Additional Functionality we could have: Information services and communication could be included: Security and safety - with the ability to summon help. Identification, location and environments in which the activity takes place. Services to provide weather forecasting, travel information, route finding, transport scheduling and information to do with leisure and entertainment
  • An example of current Handheld and / or wearable technology for GPS way finding. Could be seen as too complex and awkward for many users to meaningfully engage with. Examples of available textile based controls that may be customised to suit older users. Here we have two jackets from USA based The North Face using soft switches from UK based Textronics One possible Example of current and near future interface for feedback. Garment embedded tech interfaced with currently available smart phone tech. May be to complex and or expensive for rapid uptake by the current group of older users.
  • It may be more appropriate for the older user to have a simpler dedicated and wearable interface. These are very early non functioning rapid prototypes produced by PhD student David Taylor to illustrate some ideas for a technology interface which is not built into the garment. In this case giving the user flexibility in which garment they would want to wear, and moving away from the potential complexity of an expensive and relatively fragile “Smart Phone” interface. The bangle is an injection moulded piece, with a ‘set in’ OLED screen and tactile polymer switches. The arm band is made from ripstop hard shell fabric or laminated soft shell fabric with a velcro closure and a ‘welded in’ rigid or flexible OLED screen combined with sewn in soft switches from Textronics.
  • Research into Academic Publication – to introduce new researchers to this emerging hybrid discipline One book already Planning two more Several papers already published Research into Teaching - MA/MFA Smart Clothes and Wearable Technology programme at UWN Validated in March 2010 Launch Autumn 2010 Education of designers and researchers of the future in Smart Clothes and Wearable Technology Unique in UK / Europe Research creating a route into industry Development of real working prototypes Development of new / improved strategies for routes to market: promotion and sales, customisation, maintenance, servicing Sustainable end of life disposal / reuse of a hybrid mix of emerging wearable technologies Possibility of ‘spin out’ commercialisation from UWN Research creating real social and economic benefits Knowledge and expertise transfer into industry and the wider community Long term impact on the well being of the active ageing Potential lessening of the burden on heath and care services
  • Thanks to Boris. Due to the current problems with travel the teams wishes to thank University of Westminster for making this presentation.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Design for Ageing Well: Improving the Quality of Life for the Ageing Population using a Technology-Enabled Garment System 1 Altemeyer B, 2 McCann J, 2 Taylor D 1 University of Westminster, 2 University of Wales Newport
    • 2. The Active Ageing
      • ‘ Baby Boomers’ have been accustomed to making choices in the design of their clothing throughout their lives
      • Within their lifetime textile innovations have included stretch fibres, fleece constructions and waterproof / ‘breathable’ protection
      • User expectations and requirements have developed accordingly
    • 3. Innovations within their lifetime
      • Witnessed early adopters of technical textiles – tech clothing, intimate apparel, sportswear
    • 4. New vision…
      • Change the perception and reality of Wearable technology for older people
    • 5.
      • Source: McCann
    • 6. WORK PACKAGE 1: BEHAVIOUR
    • 7. Meaningful qualitative user engagement
      • Setting up and working with user-groups
    • 8. Introducing users to the trade
      • Requirements capture at a sporting goods trade event
    • 9. Quantitative data analysis
      • Examples:
      • Working with the University of the Third Age in UK, and Germany’s ‘Best Ager’ project.
      • Conducting online and live surveys with around 40,000 members of U3A
      • Will have sophisticated empirical data outputs and extensive experiential based knowledge
    • 10. WORK PACKAGE 2: CLOTHING
    • 11. What is currently available?
      • Textile driven functional clothing based on ‘the layering system’
        • moisture management ‘base-layer’
        • insulation mid layer
        • protective outer layer
        • additional personal protection elements
    • 12. Hybrid protection
      • Soft Shell technology
      • Personal protection
      Source: The North Face - MET 5 Jacket, Dainese - Multisport Jacket, Nike - Spectra Suit for Team USA
    • 13. The needs of the changing body
      • This project will capture the size and shape of users that fit into the BMI for underweight, average, over-weight and clinically obese.
      • Scanning will form the basis for very accurate pattern shape and fit for the older user.
    • 14. Addressing users technical and fit requirements
    • 15. WORK PACKAGE 3: TECHNOLOGY
    • 16. Embedded Technology Source: Textronics – NuMetrex, Adidas Polar - Fusion
    • 17. Range of user interfaces
      • Current handheld GPS / 3G access to the ‘cloud’
      • Current garment embedded soft switches
      • Current and near future interfaces
      • Source: Garmin, blogs.consumerreports.org, www.mycountryside.org.uk
      • Source: Images from Fibretronic website / TNF website
      • Source: Textronics/Addidas and www.diytrade.com
    • 18. Range of user interfaces
      • Concept Designs:
      • Bangle / small OLED screen / Bluetooth LE
      • Arm band/OLED screen/Bluetooth LE
      • Source: Taylor 2010
    • 19. Project Impact
      • Research into Academic publication
      • Research into teaching
      • Research creating a route into industry
      • Key Impact – Social and economic benefits to society
        • Knowledge and expertise transfer into industry and the wider community
        • Long term impact on the well being of the active ageing
        • Potential lessening of the burden on heath and care services
    • 20. Thanks
      • Thanks to Boris for presenting
      • Contact:
      • [email_address]
      • [email_address]

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