Research Proposal Presentation

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Research Proposal Presentation

  1. 1. Finding ‘Writing Voice” in ESL Classrooms A Thesis Proposal by Rene M Rodriguez Presented by Rene M. Rodriguez Astacio
  2. 2. Finding &quot;Writing Voice&quot; in ESL Classrooms <ul><li>It has been observed how the proficiency of the English Language of students in ESL classroom increases when an assignment of creative proportions is given. </li></ul><ul><li>When a student is offered an assignment that derives from creative approaches, the capacity and word usage of the English Language increases, academic writing often presenting the challenges that these students have with language . </li></ul>
  3. 3. Writing Voice <ul><li>A writer is defined to have a writing persona, an unique voice that always accompanies his or her writing. Many make the argument that voice is simply how the authors portray characterization. Others argue that voice is the “tone” in which the written piece, also known as the “atmosphere”. </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>According to Thaisa Frank & Dorothy Walls, in their book Finding Your Writer’s Voice, a writer’s voice is the way in which diction, syntax, and character development unfolds: it describes the individual style of an author. </li></ul><ul><li>For example: a flute has a different voice in comparison with a clarinet or an oboe; the words of one author have a different sound than the words of another. While one writer may add meter to their prose in order to make their writing poetic, others may write in short sentences to mark pace. Some submerge into the depths of characterization while others paint detailed mosaics. Nevertheless, this is not to be confused with writing style. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Writing Vehicle <ul><li>Writing style is an author’s vehicle. This is achieved by techniques such as sentence form, diction, and connotations and, in some cases, clichés. For example: assume you have just read a book that left you with a strong impression of the characters. Since that’s the strongest quality of the writer, he may have achieved it by frequent use of dialogues and body language between the characters. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Phonological Loop <ul><li>Other important aspects to be considered are the concept of phonological loop. According to the study “The Inner Voice of Writing” by Hayes and Chenoweth, In this study, the concept of “inner memory” is applied to writing and working memory in order to explain the phenomena of writer’s being able to “speak the words they intend to write” (99). Subsequently, Chenoweth and Hayes examine what and how inner memory and working memory interact. According to the model by Braddeley, there are three parts to the model of working memory: phonological loop being the most important one. Phonological loop stands for “the process of formulating text” (100). Phonological loop encompasses two parts: phonological short-term store, which contains all knowledge of a subject’s lexicon. </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>This material fades with time, so that’s when the sub vocal aspect comes in: the articulation of words being the prompt to remember the lexicon stored. The authors propose, then, that inner voice is instrumental when writing. If articulatory suspension happens, the phonologic store decreases and the writing perishes. It is also considered how influence from linguistic prowess of a language affects the flow of writing. If articulatory suspension happens, the phonologic store decreases and the writing perishes. It is also considered how influence from linguistic prowess of a language affects the flow of writing. </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>With this study, it can be deduced, then, that the phonological loop is the dominant factor, for a student’s vocabulary prowess might be affected by the readings that they might be doing before the time of writing comes, therefore traces from other writers as well as their vehicle might be found in their writings. However, this might not be the only factor that affects students. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Other Factors <ul><li>Other factors, such as writing for leisure outside of classrooms, gender writings, stress, and writing accordingly to a student’s year of study are intricate theories that go along with this research. While there are not many researches in the Academia that directly target “writer’s voice” as a factor in Language prowess, it is backed up by researches on factors found outside of classrooms, gender an ethnic studies and teaching writing in classrooms. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Research Problem <ul><li>Observing students from a Basic English course of the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus, it was found that when students were required to submit their first drafts on a topic, their language skills were poor and their English had many faults. However, when creative assignments were given, such as writing their own stories using certain vocabulary words, their dominance of the English Language increased, such as having those students write intricate passages with rich details on settings or character behavior, their grammar having fewer problems when compared to academic writing . </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>With this mindset, a research to identify this “writing voice” in student’s creative writing has been devised. </li></ul><ul><li>A writer is defined to have a writing persona, an unique voice that always accompanies his or her writing. Therefore, it can be concluded that students in classrooms whom are required to submit creative works have this voice as well, only that it is poorly developed. The contact with works from other writers of fiction may have an impact, for students might unconsciously follow patterns from writers being read at the moment. </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Nevertheless, if a student’s writing voice is developed throughout the inclusion of creative writing techniques in classrooms, the proficiency of English increases, thus having students writing for both Academia and for creative purposes. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Justification <ul><li>Many English courses taken by college students are taken in the first 2-3 years of college education, therefore emphasizing how important it is for them to develop their writing skills before they submerge into the confines of concentration classes and academic prose. While books in colleges are mostly in English, it is important for them to gather and develop their own writing persona, for even though technical language will be learned, the proficiency of including this words in their daily vocabulary will not make their writing perfect. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Objective <ul><li>With this knowledge, English Professors will be able to develop a writing voice in students, achieving confidence and individuality and fighting off &quot;writing anxiety.&quot; </li></ul>
  15. 15. Context of Study <ul><li>This research will follow the lines of documentary research: student writings from a Basic English course will be closely analyzed, searching for common grammar mistakes and their appearances on both academic and creative works, as well as well as word usage, diction, descriptions and pace—each one of this elements brought forward with the intention of defining a student’s writing persona. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Related Research <ul><li>Phonological Loop Theory </li></ul><ul><li>Writing Anxiety </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;Performing Writing, Performing Literacy&quot; by Jenn Fishman. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Research Questions <ul><li>What kind of writing comes the easiest, Academic or Creative? Why? </li></ul><ul><li>What kind of problems related to writing are there? </li></ul><ul><li>If so, do these difficulties were carried over from high school? </li></ul><ul><li>What elements of creative writing are used in the creation of text and could be implemented in classrooms? </li></ul><ul><li>What common grammar mistakes are found between each kind of writing? </li></ul><ul><li>Word Usage. Are they learned in class or obtained from another medium? </li></ul>
  18. 18. Methodology <ul><li>The sampling for this study will be based on convenience sampling, since direct access to student writings in classrooms is available. It will follow a Survey Model, gathering data in the form of creative and academic writings that measures discourse on ESL students from which a generalization and explanation on the subject of student’s writing voice, as well as a representation of a population, can be constructed. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Time and Place <ul><li>The methods for this research involve acquiring writing samples from students of INGL3101 (Basic English) from the University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez Campus that encompass Expository and Creative Writing during a full semester. These students will be from my Basic English class and, because I had though about the research before hand, a variety of academic and creative writings were assigned to the students in order to have enough data for analysis. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Validity <ul><li>In terms of validity, an explanation of each assignment was written before them being assigned. Also, if the students went for tutoring to the writing center at campus, they were asked to submit their first draft so that the original writing serves as the data. The submitted works come from emails sent by the students, since the class has a homework email where they submit their assignments. After classes in the semester are over, an email will be sent to each student to ask for their participation as well as how the research works. If any ethical issue were to arise, like the leak of the name of a participant, the submission will be destroyed. Also the names of participants in printed copies of submissions will be deleted in case they were to get lost. </li></ul>
  21. 21. References <ul><li>Chenoweth, N. Ann and John R. Hayes. “The Inner Voice in Writing.” Written </li></ul><ul><li>Communication. 20.1 (2003): 99-118. Print. </li></ul><ul><li>Creme, Phyllis and Celia Hunt. “Creative Participation in Essay Writing Process.” </li></ul><ul><li>Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 1.2 (2002): 145-166. Print. </li></ul><ul><li>Fishman, Jenn. et. al. “Performing Writing, Performing Literacy.” College </li></ul><ul><li>Composition and Communication 57.2 (2005): 224-252. Print. </li></ul><ul><li>Frank, Thaisa. Dorothy Walls. Finding Your Writer’s Voice. New York: St. Martin’s </li></ul><ul><li>Griffin, 1996. Print. </li></ul>
  22. 22. <ul><li>Summers, Nancy. Laura Saltz. “The Novice as Expert: Writing the Freshman.” College Composition and Communication 56.1 (2004): 124-149. Print. </li></ul><ul><li>Teranishi, Christy, Ned Kock, and Jeffrey Cass. “Pain and Pleasure in Short Essay Writing: Factors Predicting University Students’ Writing Anxiety and Writing Self-Efficacy.” Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy 54.5 (2011): 315-360. Print. </li></ul><ul><li>Teranishi, Christy, Ned Kock, and Jeffrey Cass. “Pain and Pleasure in Short Essay </li></ul><ul><li>Writing: Factors Predicting University Students’ Writing Anxiety and Writing Self-Efficacy.” Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy 54.5 (2011): 315-360. Print. </li></ul>

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