Differentiation Responsive Instruction Responsive Students A balanced, holistic approach to literacy learning & instructio...
Origins… <ul><li>Who I am </li></ul><ul><li>My role at the York Catholic District School Board </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Liter...
Ningwakwe/E. Priscilla George “ R a i n b o w  Woman” <ul><li>A Deer Clan Anishnawbe from the Chippewas of Saugeen First N...
The Medicine Wheel as a  Model for Education SPIRIT -attitudes, insights -overcoming challenges HEART -a feeling about one...
” Aboriginal literacy is about recognizing the symbols that come to us through the Spirit, Heart, Mind and Body, interpret...
The  R a i n b o w <ul><li>Identifies commonly-held views about what certain colours represent among various Aboriginal cu...
RED <ul><li>“ Red represents the language of  origin  of First Nations individuals and/or communities.” </li></ul><ul><li>...
ORANGE <ul><li>“ Orange symbolizes the skills required for  oral literacy  (speaking, listening…).” </li></ul><ul><li>Invo...
YELLOW <ul><li>“ Yellow refers to the  creative means  by which Aboriginal Peoples had to learn to  communicate with other...
GREEN <ul><li>“ Green refers to the literacy in the  languages of the European newcomers  to this land a little over five ...
BLUE <ul><li>“ Blue refers to the skills required to communicate using  technology .” </li></ul><ul><li>Computers and on-l...
INDIGO <ul><li>“ Indigo refers to the skills required for  spiritual or cultural literacy  – the ability to interpret drea...
VIOLET <ul><li>“ Violet refers to the  holistic base  to Aboriginal literacy, the way in which integrate all of the above ...
Key Points: <ul><li>Learners reclaim their voice </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers help Learners recognize their gifts </li></ul>...
The Literacy Prism
Making Connections… <ul><li>The parallel placement of the faces relates to the relationship of the teacher and learner –  ...
Making Connections… <ul><li>The beam of light that causes refraction represents the  shared, common beliefs  about our  ev...
METACOGNITION <ul><li>How teaching and learning originates within us  </li></ul><ul><li>An analysis of practice and eviden...
DIFFERENTIATION <ul><li>Teaching methods </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Karen Hume </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Carol Ann Tomlinson <...
ORAL COMMUNICATION <ul><li>Oral communication skills </li></ul><ul><li>Honouring cultural traditions which embrace oral li...
FUNCTIONAL SKILLS <ul><li>Functional skills and processes: reading (implicit and explicit meaning-making; making connectio...
21 ST  CENTURY SKILLS <ul><li>Inquiry-based Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Computer and Technological literacy </li></ul><ul><...
SPIRITUAL LITERACY <ul><li>Our faith as our guiding force toward social justice </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In our schools a...
CRITICAL LITERACY <ul><li>“ Reading the word to read the world…” (Paulo Freire) </li></ul><ul><li>“…  the new basics…” (Al...
 
Why are we doing this? <ul><li>To support the various initiatives of our Aboriginal Education Steering Committee; to authe...
The  L i t e r a c y   P r i s m  in Action <ul><li>A project still in its infancy… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fashioning Nativ...
As related to our mission statement: <ul><li>We are a Catholic Learning Community of collaborative partners, called to ser...
Catholic Graduate Expectations: <ul><ul><li>Metacognition:  a reflective, creative and holistic thinker; a self-directed, ...
The  L i t e r a c y   P r i s m  Supports  Literacy Gains  Initiative…  <ul><li>Equity:  “Literacy, in all its forms, is ...
<ul><li>Learning:  “Literacy development requires opportunities for making meaning, and engaging in productive social inte...
Questions? Comments?
Prayer for the Journey of Healing By Michael Way Skinner O God, Whose spirit guides all our endeavours. You who created AL...
We accept your call To play a small role in this great rising. May those who oppress others learn  Compassion, express sor...
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When Faith Meets Pedagogy 2009

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  • To be honest, I came across the work of Dr. George almost by accident. When I was asked to participate in our Board’s Aboriginal Education Steering Committee, I wondered what I could contribute in my role as Program Resource Teacher for Literacy. My partner and I had been struggling to define our roles and establish a vision for literacy, that when I came across the Rainbow model (which happened merely through Google), it was precisely what I was looking for. Priscilla George is Anishnawbe from the Chippewas of Saugeen First Nation in Southern Ontario. She firmly believes in the holistic approach to literacy and to life: balancing the Spirit, Heart, Mind, and Body. An educator for over thirty-five years, George developed the literacy program at the Native Women’s Resource Centre in Toronto in 1987. She has also authored books on Native Literacy for national projects with Parkland Regional College and with the Ontario Native Literacy Coalition. Ningwakwe advocates for the holistic approach to literacy/life, which means recognizing and nurturing Spirit, Heart, Mind and Body concurrently.
  • -used by a teaching team with the First Nations Technical Institute; the team observed these learning outcomes when using this model -a traditional symbol of balance  the need to recognize and nurture ALL four parts of ourselves -”Aboriginal literacy is about recognizing the symbols that come to us through the Spirit, Heart, Mind and Body, interpreting them and acting upon them for the improvement of the quality of our lives. Institutional education systems have tended to focus on the Mind – through cognitive outcomes, and possibly Body – through physical education, and subjects that teach physical skill, such as woodworking. That is, 50% of us is not being recognized and nurtured in that system.” (George)
  • -developing in 1998 for adult literacy learning programs in Toronto PARTICIPANTS’ TASK: While listening/watching, complete the handout provided. In the left-hand column are the colours of the Rainbow Model. What connections can you make to what we are currently doing in our classrooms to the ideas being presented? We will compare your thoughts with the Literacy Prism facets later on in the presentation.
  • -direct teaching of Aboriginal languages is imperative -a reminder of those who have come and gone before -a reflection of one’s origins
  • -continuation of Oral Tradition
  • -expressing ideas in various formats -sounds similar? (differentiated instruction…)
  • -using “mainstream” language systems to communicate experiences, ideas specific to Aboriginal heritage  can be accessed by more people and has a significant impact -seems highly contradictory… fewer and fewer people have access to the traditional languages, but what would be tragic is loss of access to the traditions themselves; using the European languages allow people who have lost touch with the Aboriginal languages to hold to their culture and their past, while looking into the future
  • -differentiating the “space” in which the Learner experiences his/her learning opportunities, author’s his/her personal story and learns about others
  • -Aboriginal spirituality -connections to nature; symbology -mythology
  • -success for all -honouring students from where they are
  • -the prism was chosen as a symbol for this model  closely related to a rainbow  easily related to  marries a concept that is traditionally mathematical and scientific with principles which traditionally are not; this emphasizes the cross-curricular and inter-disciplinary nature of this model *teaching as an art AND a science…
  • -reflects a shifting paradigm in education  teacher as facilitator  student as partner in education
  • -embracing new notions of literacy -new ways of knowing -moving traditional institutional norms of education into the 21 st century
  • *Critical pedagogy: how we think, unthink, and rethink about how we teach
  • This ‘facet’ would also include a literacy skills continuum for each subject area/discipline to show a sense of continuity between the elementary and secondary panels. Once this continuum is established, it would be presented to each respective Subject Council for review. This review would lead to enduring expectations – what teachers should, must, and may do. The skills continuum and enduring expectations would subsequently be presented to grades 7 and 8 teachers so that teachers can not only support student learning and success, but essentially, teachers would be supporting teachers as well.
  • These skills are crucial to 21st century learners because students must be able to construct personal knowledge in order to make good decisions. Since knowledge is constantly changing, students must be equipped with these skills to continue learning independently, even once they have left school. *Teacher librarians as key partners here…
  • -self-identification process -offering of Native Studies courses
  • From: Moving Literacies for Learning Forward. High-Level Indicators for Principals and Other Facilitators of Teacher Learning (October 2008) -evidence-based ways to make a difference in students’ achievement -features certain instructional approaches: modeling, shared practice, guided practice, independent practice; groupings: whole class or small groups -involves a great deal of metacognition on the part of both teachers and students
  • From: Moving Literacies for Learning Forward. High-Level Indicators for Principals and Other Facilitators of Teacher Learning (October 2008) -evidence-based ways to make a difference in students’ achievement -features certain instructional approaches: modeling, shared practice, guided practice, independent practice; groupings: whole class or small groups -involves a great deal of metacognition on the part of both teachers and students
  • Transcript of "When Faith Meets Pedagogy 2009"

    1. 1. Differentiation Responsive Instruction Responsive Students A balanced, holistic approach to literacy learning & instruction The Literacy Prism Based on the Research and Work of Ningwakwe/ E. Priscilla George When Faith Meets Pedagogy October 23, 2009. Christine Cosentino Program Resource Teacher, Literacy (Grades 7-12) York Catholic District School Board
    2. 2. Origins… <ul><li>Who I am </li></ul><ul><li>My role at the York Catholic District School Board </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Literacy PRT </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Aboriginal Ed. Steering Committee </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. Ningwakwe/E. Priscilla George “ R a i n b o w Woman” <ul><li>A Deer Clan Anishnawbe from the Chippewas of Saugeen First Nation </li></ul><ul><li>Former National Speaker for the National Indigenous Literacy Association (NILA); currently serves as President </li></ul><ul><li>Former schoolteacher, having taught primary grades, special education, and English as a Second Language with the TDSB for 14 years </li></ul><ul><li>Was an Addictions Counsellor at an Aboriginal Treatment Centre </li></ul><ul><li>taught in the Working Skills for Native Women program through George Brown College </li></ul><ul><li>Believes that literacy impacts all areas of </li></ul><ul><li>Life </li></ul>
    4. 4. The Medicine Wheel as a Model for Education SPIRIT -attitudes, insights -overcoming challenges HEART -a feeling about oneself or others -interconnectedness -different worldviews MIND -knowledge -research and development -assessment BODY -skills -dialogue and collaboration -relationships
    5. 5. ” Aboriginal literacy is about recognizing the symbols that come to us through the Spirit, Heart, Mind and Body, interpreting them and acting upon them for the improvement of the quality of our lives . Institutional education systems have tended to focus on the Mind – through cognitive outcomes, and possibly Body – through physical education, and subjects that teach physical skill, such as woodworking. That is, 50% of us is not being recognized and nurtured in that system .”
    6. 6. The R a i n b o w <ul><li>Identifies commonly-held views about what certain colours represent among various Aboriginal cultures </li></ul><ul><li>Each colour is affiliated with an aspect of literacy education </li></ul>
    7. 7. RED <ul><li>“ Red represents the language of origin of First Nations individuals and/or communities.” </li></ul><ul><li>Languages were given by the Creator and are an integral part of daily life </li></ul><ul><li>Language is the primary vehicle through which culture and tradition are shared and passed down from generation to generation </li></ul>
    8. 8. ORANGE <ul><li>“ Orange symbolizes the skills required for oral literacy (speaking, listening…).” </li></ul><ul><li>Involving the Elders to share the teachings </li></ul><ul><li>Talking Circles </li></ul>
    9. 9. YELLOW <ul><li>“ Yellow refers to the creative means by which Aboriginal Peoples had to learn to communicate with others who spoke another language or through other than the written word, by using symbols (pictographs, artwork, music) and/or sign language.” </li></ul><ul><li>Crafts help students get in touch with their creativity </li></ul>
    10. 10. GREEN <ul><li>“ Green refers to the literacy in the languages of the European newcomers to this land a little over five hundred years ago, English and/or French, and which have also been given the status of official languages.” </li></ul><ul><li>Using these languages reclaim voices that have been traditionally silenced </li></ul>
    11. 11. BLUE <ul><li>“ Blue refers to the skills required to communicate using technology .” </li></ul><ul><li>Computers and on-line learning </li></ul><ul><li>Networks and social networking sites used to share stories and experiences </li></ul>
    12. 12. INDIGO <ul><li>“ Indigo refers to the skills required for spiritual or cultural literacy – the ability to interpret dreams, visions or natural events, which are seen to be messages from the Spirit World – the sighting of an animal, the shape of a cloud, seeing a certain person at a particular point in time, etc.” </li></ul>
    13. 13. VIOLET <ul><li>“ Violet refers to the holistic base to Aboriginal literacy, the way in which integrate all of the above – facilitating spiritual, emotional, mental and physical learning outcomes – striving for balance .” </li></ul>
    14. 14. Key Points: <ul><li>Learners reclaim their voice </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers help Learners recognize their gifts </li></ul><ul><li>Learners become Teachers and role models </li></ul><ul><li>The process of learning as a journey </li></ul>
    15. 15. The Literacy Prism
    16. 16. Making Connections… <ul><li>The parallel placement of the faces relates to the relationship of the teacher and learner – learning side-by-side , each contributing to a collective body of knowledge, using a common language ; this implies that teacher and student are working alongside one another to foster positive and mutually-beneficial co-operation. </li></ul>
    17. 17. Making Connections… <ul><li>The beam of light that causes refraction represents the shared, common beliefs about our ever-expanding understanding of literacy and desire for improved student learning . </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Learning is on-going </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Never a finite process </li></ul></ul></ul>
    18. 18. METACOGNITION <ul><li>How teaching and learning originates within us </li></ul><ul><li>An analysis of practice and evidence to inform goal-setting and decision-making </li></ul><ul><li>Professional development </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Voluntary teacher networks </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Critical pedagogy (Joan Wink) </li></ul>
    19. 19. DIFFERENTIATION <ul><li>Teaching methods </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Karen Hume </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Carol Ann Tomlinson </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Learning opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Embracing the arts in all curricular areas </li></ul><ul><li>Creative, critical thinking </li></ul><ul><li>Addressing the needs related to boys’ literacy </li></ul>
    20. 20. ORAL COMMUNICATION <ul><li>Oral communication skills </li></ul><ul><li>Honouring cultural traditions which embrace oral literacy and giving them an authentic place in the classroom to promote inclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Recognizing that certain learners (especially boys) require frequent discussion to promote the development of ideas </li></ul>
    21. 21. FUNCTIONAL SKILLS <ul><li>Functional skills and processes: reading (implicit and explicit meaning-making; making connections ); writing (content – idea development; conventions – spelling, punctuation, grammar) </li></ul><ul><li>Media literacy </li></ul><ul><li>Operational literacy – including Modern and International Languages (French, Italian, Spanish, etc.) </li></ul>
    22. 22. 21 ST CENTURY SKILLS <ul><li>Inquiry-based Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Computer and Technological literacy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Web 2.0 Applications </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Informational literacy </li></ul><ul><li>Digital-Age Literacy, Effective Communication, High Productivity, Inventive Thinking (enGauge 21 st Century Skills for 21 st Century Learners) </li></ul>
    23. 23. SPIRITUAL LITERACY <ul><li>Our faith as our guiding force toward social justice </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In our schools and classrooms </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In our communities </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In the world </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Students as agents of social change </li></ul><ul><li>Inspiration: Scriptural traditions, Catholic Graduate Expectations, Catholic social teachings </li></ul><ul><li>Seven Grandfather Teachings: Honesty, Humility, Courage, Wisdom, Respect, Generosity and Love </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Consistent with the Cardinal (prudence, justice, temperance, courage) and Theological (faith, hope, love) virtues </li></ul></ul></ul>
    24. 24. CRITICAL LITERACY <ul><li>“ Reading the word to read the world…” (Paulo Freire) </li></ul><ul><li>“… the new basics…” (Allen Luke) </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding teachers’ and students’ positioning </li></ul><ul><li>Embracing and challenging divergent points of view </li></ul><ul><li>Bringing in multiple interpretations of the world into the classroom </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural literacy; cultural proficiency </li></ul>
    25. 26. Why are we doing this? <ul><li>To support the various initiatives of our Aboriginal Education Steering Committee; to authenticate our commitment to supporting our Aboriginal students </li></ul><ul><li>To define a framework that reflects our beliefs about sound literacy principles unified under a holistic approach that is beneficial to all students </li></ul>
    26. 27. The L i t e r a c y P r i s m in Action <ul><li>A project still in its infancy… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fashioning Native Studies courses around this framework (2009-2010) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Professional Learning Series </li></ul></ul>
    27. 28. As related to our mission statement: <ul><li>We are a Catholic Learning Community of collaborative partners, called to serve one another by being committed to and accountable for quality learning by all with Jesus as our inspiration. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Metacognition: collaborative partners; committed … and accountable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Oral Communication: quality learning by all </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Differentiation: quality learning by all </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Functional Skills: quality learning by all </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>21st Century Skills: quality learning by all </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spiritual Literacy: called to serve one another; Jesus as our inspiration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Critical Literacy: collaborative partners; accountable for quality learning by all </li></ul></ul>
    28. 29. Catholic Graduate Expectations: <ul><ul><li>Metacognition: a reflective, creative and holistic thinker; a self-directed, responsible, lifelong learner </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Oral Communication: an effective communicator; a reflective, creative and holistic thinker </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Differentiation: a caring family member; a responsible citizen; a collaborative contributor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Functional Skills: an effective communicator; a self-directed, responsible, lifelong learner </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>21st Century Skills: a reflective, creative and holistic thinker; a collaborative contributor; an effective communicator </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spiritual Literacy: a discerning believer formed in the Catholic faith community; a reflective, creative and holistic thinker; a self-directed, responsible, lifelong learner ; a collaborative contributor; a caring family member; a responsible citizen </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Critical Literacy: a discerning believer formed in the Catholic faith community; a reflective, creative and holistic thinker; a self-directed, responsible, lifelong learner ; a collaborative contributor; a caring family member; a responsible citizen </li></ul></ul>
    29. 30. The L i t e r a c y P r i s m Supports Literacy Gains Initiative… <ul><li>Equity: “Literacy, in all its forms, is an equity issue.” </li></ul><ul><li>Curriculum: “Subject specialists have a collective responsibility for developing literacies for learning.” </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment & Evaluation: “Educators need to know how and whether they’re making a difference in students’ literacy knowledge and skills.” </li></ul>
    30. 31. <ul><li>Learning: “Literacy development requires opportunities for making meaning, and engaging in productive social interaction and talk.” </li></ul><ul><li>Learning Tools: “Whereas the technologies of print previously defined literacy, new technologies are broadening notions of text and creating new literacies. Print literacies are not eclipsed, but rather exist in a new context.” </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching Practices: “Literacies for learning can be embedded when teachers develop a pedagogy of literacy for their discipline.” </li></ul>The L i t e r a c y P r i s m Supports Literacy Gains Initiative…
    31. 32. Questions? Comments?
    32. 33. Prayer for the Journey of Healing By Michael Way Skinner O God, Whose spirit guides all our endeavours. You who created ALL people in your image, Lead us to seek compassion as we gather here today. We place before you the pain and anguish Rooted in the loss of land, language, lore, Culture and family kinship That aboriginal peoples have experienced. We live in a faith of resurrection, and We are confident that all people will rise From the depths of despair and hopelessness.
    33. 34. We accept your call To play a small role in this great rising. May those who oppress others learn Compassion, express sorrow And ask forgiveness. Toughen the broken, Homeless and afflicted. Heal their spirits. In your mercy and compassion, walk with us, As we continue our journey of healing, To create a future that is just and equitable. God, you are our hope. Amen.

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