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Evaluation of Information

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From GNED 104 course - Research - course I created at Morrisville State College

From GNED 104 course - Research - course I created at Morrisville State College


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Transcript

  • 1. GNED104 -- Library Research Methods
    • Evaluation
    • Of
    • Your sources
  • 2. Evaluation of Your Sources.
    • Books, magazines, websites
    • Criteria
      • Authority/credibility
      • Content
  • 3. Evaluation of Your Sources -- Books
    • Authority/credibility
    • 1. Is author's name included?
    • 2. What is the expertise of the author? Is it related to the topic of the book?
    • A. Education
    • B. Profession
    • C. Other publications
  • 4. Evaluation of Your Sources -- Books
    • Authority/credibility
    • 3. What is the author's opinion? Is it backed up with facts (statistics, historical data, etc.)?
    • 4. Who publishes the item? Is there hidden "agenda," or a cause, or is it just a business?
  • 5. Evaluation of Your Sources -- Books
    • Authority/credibility
    • 5. Is it a reliable source? Why? Does it include a bibliography or works cited page?
    • A. Check book reviews
    • B. Is it listed in other sources?
  • 6. Evaluation of Your Sources -- Books
    • Content
    • 1. When was item written?
    • A. Older material may be out of date
    • B. Older material may be useful for historical research
    • 2. Is the content meaningful and useful? Why ?
    • 3. Is there evidence of any bias, either by the author or the publisher? Bias is not necessarily bad if it is obvious
  • 7. Evaluation of Your Sources -- Books
    • Content
    • 4. Is it objective or subjective (facts, or opinion/creative)?
    • 5. Is the information accurate? Why?
    • 6. Is it primary source material? Did the person witness the event (primary) or just writing about it (secondary)?
  • 8. Evaluation of Your Sources -- Magazines
    • Authority/credibility
    • 1. Is author's name included?
    • 2. What is the expertise of the author?
    • (Education, profession, publications,etc.)
    • 3. What is the author's opinion is? Is it backed up with facts (statistics, historical data, etc.)?
  • 9. Evaluation of Your Sources -- Magazines
    • Authority/credibility
    • 4. Who publishes the item? Is there hidden "agenda," or a cause, or is it just a business?
    • [For example, Washington Monthly (a newspaper) is owned and published by the Unification Church]
    • 5. Is it a reliable source? Why? Does it include a bibliography or works cited page?
  • 10. Evaluation of Your Sources -- Magazines
    • Content
    • 1. When was item written?
    • A. Technical topics need current material
    • B. Older magazines may be useful for certain topics
    • 2. Is the content meaningful and useful? Why ?
  • 11. Evaluation of Your Sources -- Magazines
    • Content
    • 3. Is there evidence of any bias, either by the author or the publisher?
    • 4. Is it objective or subjective (facts, or opinion/creative)?
    • A. Newspapers such as National Inquirer or the Star are not considered factual!!
    • B. Many magazine articles in popular magazines may appear factual but are actually more subjective
  • 12. Evaluation of Your Sources -- Magazines
    • Content
    • 5. Is the information accurate? Why?
    • 6. Is it primary source material?
    • A. Newspapers may be primary or secondary. If reporter witnessed the event in person then it is primary, if not it is secondary.
    • B. Be careful. Some articles may appear to be primary sources but are really secondary.
  • 13. Evaluation of Your Sources -- Web Pages
    • Authority/credibility
    • 1. Is author's name included?
    • A. You must know who wrote or who is responsible for a website.
    • B. Do not use a site if there is no obvious author or group responsible for it.
    • 2. What is the expertise of the author?
    • A. Anyone can put up a webpage on any topic!!
    • B. Expertise must be evaluated when looking at web sites.
  • 14. Evaluation of Your Sources -- Web Pages
    • Authority/credibility
    • 3. What is the author's opinion? Is it backed up with facts (statistics, historical data, etc.)? What is the source of the statistics or other facts?
    • 4. Who publishes the item? Is there hidden "agenda," or a cause, or is it just a business? (N.R.A. website would not give a balanced view on gun control)
    • 5. Is it a reliable source? Why? What other sites point to it?
  • 15. Evaluation of Your Sources -- Webpages
    • Content
    • 1. When was item written?
    • A. Many web sites never get updated.
    • B. Don’t use a web site if there is no date for when it was created or updated.
    • 2. Is the content meaningful and useful? Why ?
    • 3. Is there evidence of any bias, either by the author or the publisher?
  • 16. Evaluation of Your Sources -- Webpages
    • Content
    • 4. Is it objective or subjective (facts, or opinion/creative)? Where is the web site housed? Who is the host site?
    • 5. Is the information accurate? Why?
    • 6. Is it primary source material? Is the author involved in the events or simply restating ideas from others?