Commissioner Schouten Oct2013 presentation to Washington County community group

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Washington County Commissioner Dick Schouten gave a presentation to the Committee for Citizen Involvement in October 2013. Three basic areas that encompass the work of Commissioner for his District:
1. Serving as the mayor and city council for the residents of the urban unincorporated parts of the county (nearly 200,000 people)
2. Provision of traditional county services (election, jail, health and human services, etc.). They set policy, pass laws, approve budgets for services
3. Serve as the Board of Directors for Clean Water Services, a comprehensive sanitation, water quality and stormwater management agency that is very well respected across the country.

Commissioner Schouten covered three topics:
Aloha-Reedville Study Area, Vehicle Registration Fee, and the 10-Year Plan to End Homelessness (in Year 5).

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  • The Aloha-Reedville Study and Livable Community Plan is a three-year effort being jointly undertaken by Washington County's Department of Land Use & Transportation and Department of Housing Services.
    The study's primary objectives are to understand the existing conditions within this mostly unincorporated area of Washington County and to develop strategies to enhance the community's ability to attract investments and be better prepared to accommodate the jobs and housing that regional growth will bring.
    Funded by federal Sustainable Communities grants, a Metro Construction Excise Tax grant and County matching funds.
    The study is in its final year.
  • A related effort led by ODOT is working to identify transportation solutions along the TV Highway Corridor.
    Both projects include heavy commitments to public involvement, and the project teams are coordinating closely.
  • Based on the 5,000+ public comments provided to the Aloha-Reedville Study's project team so far, we have developed a series of draft actions to address community concerns and aspirations.
    This list of actions includes:
    Roads and transit
    Sidewalks and trails
    Parks
    Streetlights
    Housing affordable to everyone
    Active commercial centers
  • We’re asking residents to join us at one of the following events to review the draft actions and talk with the project team. We're asking one question: "Will these actions move Aloha and Reedville forward in a manner you can support?"
  • Commissioner Schouten Oct2013 presentation to Washington County community group

    1. 1. Commissioner Dick Schouten WASHINGTON COUNTY Committee for Citizen Involvement October 15, 2013
    2. 2. Overview • Aloha-Reedville Study Update • Vehicle Registration Fee • 10-year Plan to End Homelessness • Questions?
    3. 3. Update on Aloha-Reedville Study
    4. 4. Aloha-Reedville Update
    5. 5. Aloha-Reedville Update
    6. 6. Aloha-Reedville Update Draft actions are meant to address these areas of community concern: • Roads and transit • Sidewalks and trails • Parks • Streetlights • Housing affordable to everyone • Active commercial centers
    7. 7. Aloha-Reedville Update We’re asking Aloha-Reedville residents to join us at one of the following community events:
    8. 8. Vehicle Registration Fee
    9. 9. County Transportation System Facts • • Washington County maintains: Approximately 1,300 miles of roads: – half urban; half rural – 1,075 miles paved; 225 miles gravel • Of paved roads: – 198 miles are arterials – 247 miles are collectors • • Over 430 lane miles of countymaintained arterials and collectors are in cities Pavement is just part of the system: – – – – – 189 bridges 3,021 culverts 700 miles of ditches 284 signalized intersections Lighting, landscaping, signs
    10. 10. Transportation Funding Strategy “Three Legged Stool”
    11. 11. Maintenance Funding Challenges • Gas and user taxes not keeping up with cost increases • Material and labor costs outpacing revenue growth – Example: Asphalt costs have tripled since 2004 • Increasing deferred maintenance
    12. 12. Increasing Need Funding gap expected to double within 10 years Projected Funding v. Needs $55 Amount (in millions) $50 $45 $40 Projected Needs $35 Forecast Funding $30 $25 $20 12 20 13 20 14 20 15 20 16 20 17 20 18 20 19 20 20 20 21 20 Year 2012 deferred maintenance estimate = $10.5m 2021 deferred maintenance projected = $22m Forecasted Funding grows at approx. 3% annually while Projected Needs grows at approx. 5% annually
    13. 13. Vehicle Registration Fee Overview • Current proposal: $30 annual fee per vehicle; $17 for motorcycles – Works out to $2.50 per month • State law would exempt: – – – – – – Farm vehicles Antique vehicles Campers & travel trailers Trucks weighing over 26,000 lbs. Publicly owned vehicles Vehicles owned by disabled veterans • 60% to County and 40% to cities
    14. 14. Vehicle Registration Fee Overview • At $30 per year, a local vehicle registration fee would: – Generate about $12.6 million per year – Would bring County roads up to standard and keep them there for 15 to 20 years – Help cities maintain and improve their roadways – Some traffic signals could be updated to help move traffic more efficiently • Most importantly, funds would pay for road maintenance now, avoiding more expensive repairs later
    15. 15. Next Steps/Questions • Public hearing June 3, 2014 • Additional public outreach until then • More information at: www.co.washington.or.us/vrf
    16. 16. 10-year Plan to End Homelessness
    17. 17. 10-year Plan to End Homelessness Goals for ending homelessness: l • Prevent people from becoming homeless • Move people into housing • Link people to services and remove barriers • Increase income and economic opportunities • Expand data collection l • Implement public education on homelessness
    18. 18. 10-year Plan to End Homelessness Point-In-Time Homeless Census 1600 1383 1400 # of People 1200 1243 1000 800 1374 1352 1153 Homeless 950 752 748 Literally Homeless 751 Chronic Homeless 600 432 400 200 182 145 189 160 0 2009 2010 2011 2012 77 2013 At mid-point of the 10-Year Plan implementation: • • • • • 58% decrease in chronic homeless people 42% decrease in literally homeless people 12% decrease in people fleeing or attempting to flee domestic violence 15% increase in student homelessness 116% increase in homeless veterans
    19. 19. Causes of Homelessness Top 12 Catalysts to Homelessness Top 5 Causes 2013 48% Rent Burdened Benchmark (2007) 41% Unemployed Rent Burden Unemployed 21% Kicked out by Family/Friend Kicked Out by Family/Friends Drugs/Alcohol (Self) 19% Drug/Alcohol Addiction Criminal History 16% Criminal History Eviction Domestic Violence Mental/Emotional Disorder Other Increase in homeless as a result of: Drugs/Alcohol (In Home) • Kicked Out by Family/Friends By Choice Poor Rental History 0 50 100 150 200 250 Household 300 350 400 450 • Mental/Emotional Disorder
    20. 20. System Capacity Homeless Housing Inventory 900 800 739 700 Beds 600 605 796 624 Total Bed Inventory Permanent Supportive Housing 510 500 410 400 300 329 100 0 350 260 200 138 102 10 1/28/2009 434 166 102 98 10 10 1/27/2010 1/26/2011 Rapid Re-housing Emergency Shelter Safe Haven 221 164 Transitional Housing 98 10 1/25/2012 142 114 96 10 1/30/2013 796 beds served 1,626 people in a portfolio of homeless programs  New Rapid Re-housing (permanent) provides diversion from the shelter system  Permanent Supportive Housing prioritized for persons with disabling conditions  Beds will be aligned in new single-point entry assessment system
    21. 21. Moving Forward • Keep people in their housing! 62% of the homeless population is living doubled-up and experiencing barriers to rental housing in this landlord market with <3% vacancy rate. – Prioritize the need for emergency prevention resources; e.g. one-month rent assistance and utility assistance. – Develop affordable housing and create greater access to market rate housing. • Move people to permanent housing. – Re-program funds to deploy more Rapid Re-Housing that diverts people from the homeless system. Expand this cost effective national best practice that minimizes family crisis. • Align systems of care. – Link people to housing, services and affordable health care opportunities through a countywide single-point entry assessment system at Community Action. – Scheduled for implementation in 2014. • Data-driven planning. – Research risk factors leading to housing instability, and develop strategies to address socioeconomic elements; e.g. poverty, insufficient education, underemployment, and lack of job skills.
    22. 22. Questions? www.co.washington.or.us www.twitter.com/WashcoOregon www.facebook.com/WashcoOregon

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