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The Insiders Guide to BPM - Step 4

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Presentation from the book, the Insiders Guide to BPM: 7 Steps to Process Mastery

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The Insiders Guide to BPM - Step 4

  1. 1. The Insiders’ Guide toBPM7 Steps to Process MasteryBy Terry Schurter Step 4 – Orchestrate for RealTime Demand
  2. 2. The Insiders’ Guide to BPM: Step 4 Orchestrate for Real TimeDemandWhat we know…1. Work doesn’t conform to neat process models and nice rules2. Instead, it is “driven” by the context of the moment3. And there is always a new challenge we must address lurkingjust around the corner!We also know…1. More often than not, the SYSTEM doesn’t help us adapt2. Instead, it acts as a BARRIER to getting work done!So we must design our processes to…1. Enable adaptation, not be a barrier to it!Orchestrate for Real Time Demand2The Insiders’ Guide to BPM by Terry Schurter - www.tschurter.com
  3. 3. The Insiders’ Guide to BPM: Step 4 Orchestrate for Real TimeDemandTo build a foundation for process orchestration needs, we can lookat 5 (five) process characteristics that deeply influenceorchestration requirements. These 5 characteristics are:1. Work Assignment: How each participant has their work assigned2. Task Order: The order pattern in which they perform their Tasks3. Work Patterns: The work pattern for work items4. Work Triggers: How work is “triggered” (available)5. Process Duration: Duration (elapsed time) from start to finishUnderstanding Orchestration Needs3The Insiders’ Guide to BPM by Terry Schurter - www.tschurter.com
  4. 4. The Insiders’ Guide to BPM: Step 4 Orchestrate for Real TimeDemandOrchestration needs are assessed for each process Participantdefined in Step 2 – helping us to understand the needs of eachof these groups of people.In addition, because Supervisors and Managers are often directlyresponsible for work orchestration these roles are alsoincluded in the orchestration assessment.Note – starting with this step (4) we are capturing process characteristics forthe overall process experience, not Task by Task.Orchestration Needs: Participants and Managers4The Insiders’ Guide to BPM by Terry Schurter - www.tschurter.com
  5. 5. The Insiders’ Guide to BPM: Step 4 Orchestrate for Real TimeDemandWork Assignment – ExamplesBy understanding how work is assigned, we can provide process Builders with theinsights to empower real-time orchestration of work assignments based on how workactually gets done by Participants and Managers.5The Insiders’ Guide to BPM by Terry Schurter - www.tschurter.comWORK SELECTION DESCRIPTIONSelectionsAssigned by system Work is automatically assigned by a software systemIn the system, I select Participants select from a list of available work in a systemSelf-directed (my judgment) Participants determine what they will work and whenAssigned by superior Work is assigned by a supervisor (person)
  6. 6. The Insiders’ Guide to BPM: Step 4 Orchestrate for Real TimeDemandTask Order – ExamplesBy understanding the order in which process Participants perform their work, we canprovide process Builders with the insights to empower real-time orchestration ofTasks in the patterns that Participants and Managers require to be effective.6The Insiders’ Guide to BPM by Terry Schurter - www.tschurter.comTASK ORDER DESCRIPTIONSelectionsIn order Work is performed in a specific order with little or no deviationUsually in order Work is usually performed in a certain order, but variations do occurSelf-directed orderThe order of Tasks performed can vary, and is self-directed by theprocess Participant
  7. 7. The Insiders’ Guide to BPM: Step 4 Orchestrate for Real TimeDemandWork Patterns – ExamplesWork patterns describe how process Participants interact with work items. In manycases, Participants move between multiple items or perform concurrent work.Knowing these work patterns, process Builders can design user experiences thatempower Participants to effectively and efficiently engage in multiple work itembehaviors – as their real-time context demands.7The Insiders’ Guide to BPM by Terry Schurter - www.tschurter.comWORK PATTERNS DESCRIPTIONSelectionsOnly one item at a time Work is started and completed on one item at a timeSwitch between itemsWork occurs on multiple items, but only one item is open at atimeWork on multiple itemsWork occurs on multiple items at the same time (multiple itemsare open)
  8. 8. The Insiders’ Guide to BPM: Step 4 Orchestrate for Real TimeDemandWork Triggers – ExamplesUnderstanding work triggers tells process Builders how to facilitate the initiation ofwork items. Because work is often triggered in different ways, process Builders mustprovide the right capabilities to initiate work items - for the right person (or people).Where multiple triggers exist, this represents its own form of process orchestration.8The Insiders’ Guide to BPM by Terry Schurter - www.tschurter.comWORK TRIGGERS DESCRIPTIONSelectionsThe system - always All work is triggered by a systemThe system - withexceptionsWork is triggered by a system - but some work is triggered fromother placesCustomers(direct to me)Customers trigger work through direct interaction with theParticipantBy supervisor Work is triggered by a supervisorOther employees Work is triggered by other employeesMultiple places Work triggers come from multiple places
  9. 9. The Insiders’ Guide to BPM: Step 4 Orchestrate for Real TimeDemandProcess Duration – ExamplesProcess duration can deeply affect the process experience and process designrequirements. Extremely long process durations require far richer context, asParticipants are unlikely to “remember” specific details of a work item. Conversely,work items completed in the same day often require a highly streamlined userexperience to be effective.9The Insiders’ Guide to BPM by Terry Schurter - www.tschurter.comPROCESS DURATION DESCRIPTION (refers to total elapsed time)SelectionsLess than a day Less than one dayA day or more A day or more, but generally less than a weekA week or more A week or more, but generally less than a monthA month or more One month or more
  10. 10. The Insiders’ Guide to BPM: Step 4 Orchestrate for Real TimeDemandIn Step 4 we have:1) Assessed orchestration demands with 5 orchestrationcharacteristics2) Applied these characteristics to each process Participant3) Included Supervisors and Managers in our assessment, wherethis applies4) Producing information that will help process Builders developthe most efficient and contextually-relevant process design*The examples provided in this step can be augmented or adapted as needed toproduce the most useful orchestration assessment. In fact, challengingorchestration characteristic options can lead to new process insights anddiscoveries.Orchestration for Real Time Demand - Summary10The Insiders’ Guide to BPM by Terry Schurter - www.tschurter.com
  11. 11. The Insiders’ Guide to BPM: Step 4 Orchestrate for Real TimeDemand11The Insiders’ Guide to BPM by Terry Schurter - www.tschurter.comhttp://www.amazon.com/Insiders-Guide-BPM-Process-Mastery/dp/0929652096Would you like to learn more about Mastering BPM?http://acuitystudio.com/human-centric-process-analysis-and-improvement/

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