Risk and Crisis in a DynamicEnvironment: Crisis Communication in a             Wired World             EUPRERA 2010       ...
Crisis Process
Visibility of communicative efforts
Crisis response• Visible to constituents• Became focus of crisis communication  research
Focus today• Once “hidden” aspects of crisis  communication• Pre-crisis and Post-crisis• New risks and communication demands
Evolution via online world
Evolution via online world
Evolution via online world
Evolution: Post-crisis communication• More visible• Less attention/interest than crisis phase• First to become more visible
Evolution: Post-crisis communication• More memorials• Online memorials  – Official and Spontaneous  – Uni-vocal and Multi-...
Online memorials• Official   – Operated/sponsored by the organization• Spontaneous   – Content sharing sites (Flickr and Y...
Online memorials• Uni-vocal: speak with one voice  – Typical for organization sponsored  – The Cantor Families Memorial Si...
Functions of memorial•   Celebrate or honor persons or events•   Aid in healing from the crisis•   Allows for grieving•   ...
Private becomes public
Choices for organization: Risk• Become involved with memorial• Level of involvement  – Links (recognition)  – Sponsorship/...
Evolution: Pre-crisis communication• Semi-private become public  – Focus on prevention  – Act upon threats/warning signs• ...
Paracrisis• Managed much like a crisis  – Communication interventions• Stakes can be high as in a crisis
Now public communication• Response to the challenge  – Communication about corrective action  – Reason there is no threat
Online reality Constituents
Social media• Venue where challenges transpire  – Challenge  – Response
Paracrisis• Like a crisis• Really a threat/warning sign• Many now handled in public  – Especially true for challenge crise...
Private becomes public
Visibility is risk• Actions more visible• Pressure to be effective• Danger of not reacting
YouTube Video• Nestle sought to block it• Increased awareness• First charges of censorship
Response = Censorship"Oh please...its like were censoring everything to allow onlypositive comments"
Change• Greater transparency across range of crisis  communication
Rules• Avoid being absent• Go where the action is• Be there before the crisis
Finale• New challenges• Channel selection• Moving from private to public   – Errors compounded• Still driven by strategic ...
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Risk and Crisis in a Dynamic Environment: Crisis Communication in a Wired World

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Presentation explaining the concept of paracrisis and the effect of social media on pre-crisis communication.

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Risk and Crisis in a Dynamic Environment: Crisis Communication in a Wired World

  1. 1. Risk and Crisis in a DynamicEnvironment: Crisis Communication in a Wired World EUPRERA 2010 W. Timothy Coombs University of Central Florida
  2. 2. Crisis Process
  3. 3. Visibility of communicative efforts
  4. 4. Crisis response• Visible to constituents• Became focus of crisis communication research
  5. 5. Focus today• Once “hidden” aspects of crisis communication• Pre-crisis and Post-crisis• New risks and communication demands
  6. 6. Evolution via online world
  7. 7. Evolution via online world
  8. 8. Evolution via online world
  9. 9. Evolution: Post-crisis communication• More visible• Less attention/interest than crisis phase• First to become more visible
  10. 10. Evolution: Post-crisis communication• More memorials• Online memorials – Official and Spontaneous – Uni-vocal and Multi-vocal
  11. 11. Online memorials• Official – Operated/sponsored by the organization• Spontaneous – Content sharing sites (Flickr and YouTube) – Web sites – Social networking sites – Blogs
  12. 12. Online memorials• Uni-vocal: speak with one voice – Typical for organization sponsored – The Cantor Families Memorial Site 9/11• Multi-vocal: array of voices – Common in spontaneous – Allows for individual expression – Transocean for Deepwater Horizon victims
  13. 13. Functions of memorial• Celebrate or honor persons or events• Aid in healing from the crisis• Allows for grieving• Honor those who helped
  14. 14. Private becomes public
  15. 15. Choices for organization: Risk• Become involved with memorial• Level of involvement – Links (recognition) – Sponsorship/Host
  16. 16. Evolution: Pre-crisis communication• Semi-private become public – Focus on prevention – Act upon threats/warning signs• Growth of the paracrisis
  17. 17. Paracrisis• Managed much like a crisis – Communication interventions• Stakes can be high as in a crisis
  18. 18. Now public communication• Response to the challenge – Communication about corrective action – Reason there is no threat
  19. 19. Online reality Constituents
  20. 20. Social media• Venue where challenges transpire – Challenge – Response
  21. 21. Paracrisis• Like a crisis• Really a threat/warning sign• Many now handled in public – Especially true for challenge crises – Rumor crises too
  22. 22. Private becomes public
  23. 23. Visibility is risk• Actions more visible• Pressure to be effective• Danger of not reacting
  24. 24. YouTube Video• Nestle sought to block it• Increased awareness• First charges of censorship
  25. 25. Response = Censorship"Oh please...its like were censoring everything to allow onlypositive comments"
  26. 26. Change• Greater transparency across range of crisis communication
  27. 27. Rules• Avoid being absent• Go where the action is• Be there before the crisis
  28. 28. Finale• New challenges• Channel selection• Moving from private to public – Errors compounded• Still driven by strategic thinking (old)

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