Class Assessment

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Classroom Assessment presentation for the 2013 TaLK Orientation in 조치원 대한민국, 11th generation TaLK Scholars. The presentation covered the basic concepts of classroom assessment and specific strategies that have been used in the EFL contexts in South Korea.

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Class Assessment

  1. 1. Class Assessment Best Practices for Monitoring and Evaluating Your Classroom pp.44-55
  2. 2. Objectives • To discuss basic concepts of classroom assessment. • To discuss specific strategies for classroom assessment. • To practice critically evaluating classroom assessment strategies.
  3. 3. Schedule • Introductions • Make groups to work in • Lecture on classroom assessment • Classroom assessment activity • Classroom assessment activity feedback • Questions/ Closing
  4. 4. Who am I? •Certified Teacher – U.S.A •8yrs teaching experience 4yrs U.S. 4yrs South Korea •MRes- Educational and Social Research •EPIK/ TaLK Teacher Trainer •Assistant Professor of English at Gimcheon University Daniel Moonasar
  5. 5. Who are you? •Graduates (4yrs with degree)? •Undergraduates (2yrs and or no degree)? •Education majors? •Teaching experience? •6 month contract? •1 year contract? •Lived or visited South Korea before?
  6. 6. Group Discussion Activity Directions: 1. Make a group of 5 people. 2. Discuss and answer the question below. 3. Pick your best answer and 1 person to speak for your group. 4. When finished, we’ll share answers. Question: Why is assessment important in the classroom?
  7. 7. Lecture Contents
  8. 8. pp. 44-45 Assess what students know Exams, quizzes , homework etc. Assessment of teacher/ methods Observations, p eer feedback Assessment of classroom practices. How to teach, differentiating teaching Assessment of the learning process How to learn and think (critical thinking)
  9. 9. The need for students and teachers to monitor and evaluate learning Assessment is an ongoing process of planning, practice, and reflection Planning Practice Reflection pp. 44-45
  10. 10. improve how students learn improve what students learn improve what methods teachers use pp. 44-45
  11. 11. improve how students learn improve what students learn improve what methods teachers use Allowing students and teachers to respond to information obtained from monitoring and evaluating student learning. Assessment fulfills this purpose by: pp. 44-45
  12. 12. Table 1.1 p. 45 What classroom assessment can show us:
  13. 13. 2. Types of Assessment Formative: observations , questioning Summative: exams, repo rt cards of (summative assessment) for (formative assessment) as (self assessment) Assessment Learning Table 1.2 p. 45
  14. 14. 2. Types of Assessment- Examples • Exams, unit/national tests, quizzes, final projects, report cards • Observations, questioning, informal/formal conversations, learning logs, checklists • Discussions, critiquing, peer feedback, journals, portfolios, projects, student created assessment p. 46
  15. 15. 2. Types of Assessment Assessment for Learning (formative assessment) Who Involves the student When When descriptive feedback is needed Reporting Not reported, not an achievement grade Design To assist educators and students to improve learning What it Checks Checks learning to determine what to do next and how to do it How it Works Specific and descriptive feedback, formal or informal reports Outcomes Individual performance vs. personal best Table 1.3 pp. 46-47
  16. 16. 2. Types of Assessment Assessment of Learning (Summative Assessment) Who Does not always involve the student When For periodic report Reporting As part of an achievement grade Design For those directly and indirectly involved in daily learning and teaching (school administration, parents, teachers, and students) What it Checks Checks what has been learned to date How it Works Usually compiles data into a single number, score, or mark as part of a formal report Outcomes Compares student's learning with other students' learning or the standard for a grade Table 1.3 pp. 46-47
  17. 17. 2. Types of Assessment Assessment as Learning (self assessment) Who Involves the student When Throughout the learning process Reporting Usually immediate feedback or reflective feedback Design Designed for learning how to think or assess What it Checks Students perceptions about themselves and critical thinking skills How it Works Students assess themselves and or others in order to become self aware of the learning process Outcomes Create self-aware learners so that they can understand the purposes of their learning and grasp what they need to do to achieve. Table 1.3 pp. 46-47
  18. 18. 3. The Classroom Assessment Process Table 1.4 p. 47
  19. 19. 3. The Classroom Assessment Process Table 1.5 p. 48
  20. 20. 4. Classroom Assessment Strategies Tips for classroom assessment strategies: 1. Use them as a framework 2. Modify them to your classroom situation 3. If possible assessment should be in English 4. Read up and look for resources pp. 49-53
  21. 21. 4. Assessment as Learning Strategies Table 1.5 pp. 49-50 Name Purpose How to do it How it’s used Time Learning Logs To have students record and reflect on what they have learned. In a notebook or journal have the students answer questions such as: Today I learned… Next class I want to learn… Today was hard because… I didn’t understand… Use this for every class, or once a week. Questions can be modified for your situation. Additionally have the students read over all of them. Low- Medium
  22. 22. 4. Assessment as Learning Strategies Table 1.5 pp. 51-52 Name Purpose How to do it How it’s used Time Wall Posters To have the students self assess themselves and observe their progress Have the students create posters that reflect what they learned. Have the students answer questions on the poster such as Today I learned… I am good at… I need help with… I didn’t like This can be done at the end of a unit as review or a project. Students will be able to see their progress in class and what they need to work on. Instead of answering questions students can put smiley or sad faces next to items on their posters. High
  23. 23. 4. Assessment for Learning Strategies Name Purpose How to do it How it’s used Time Exit/ Admit Slips Used for assessing or understanding key concepts Upon entering or exiting the classroom students will be given a slip of paper with or be asked a question from the classes lesson. Students must write or answer the question correctly to be allowed in or out of the class. This strategy can also be used as a classroom management technique or used to check that information has been conveyed such as homework, or what materials they need to bring to the next class. Low Table 1.6 pp. 51-52
  24. 24. 4. Assessment for Learning Strategies Table 1.6 pp. 51-52 Teacher poses a question, observation, or challenge. Students think and write out answers individually. Students pair up & combine their best answers. Students share their new improved answer w/the class.
  25. 25. 4. Assessment of Learning Strategies - Rubrics Table 1.8 p. 54
  26. 26. 4. Assessment of Learning Strategies - Rubrics Table 1.8 p. 54
  27. 27. Classroom Assessment Activity Objective: Create a classroom assessment strategy based on the lecture, orientation book, and your ideas. Part 1 Instructions: 1. Discuss and plan an assessment strategy based on the scenario given to you. 2. You do not, or may not need to answer all of the assessment process questions. 3. Keep your answers succinct and focused as possible with the time that you have. 4. You have about 25 minutes to work.
  28. 28. Classroom Assessment Activity Objective: Create a classroom assessment strategy based on the lecture, orientation book, and your ideas. Part 2 Instructions: 1. Discuss the other group’s assessment plan that was given to you. 2. First read the scenario and then the group’s assessment strategy. 3. Focus on giving specific constructive feedback. Refrain from giving negative or unconstructive feedback. 4. Write notes directly on the other group’s paper.
  29. 29. Classroom Assessment Activity Objective: Create a classroom assessment strategy based on the lecture, orientation book, and your ideas. Part 3 Instructions: 1. Each group will take a turn giving feedback to the other group. 2. Focus on giving specific constructive feedback. Refrain from giving negative or unconstructive feedback.
  30. 30. Feedback and Questions
  31. 31. Sources Bibliography and Links Cohen, A. D. (1996). Verbal reports as a source of insights into second language learner strategies. Applied Language Learning, 7(1–2), 5–24. Pally, Marcia. Sustained Content Teaching in Academic ESL/EFL: A Practical Approach. Houghton Mifflin Company, 222 Berkeley Street, Boston, MA 02116- 3764, 2000. Oxford, Rebecca L., Mary Evelyn Holloway, and Diana Horton-Murillo. "Language learning styles: Research and practical considerations for teaching in the multicultural tertiary ESL/EFL classroom." System 20.4 (1992): 439-456. Reid, Joy M. Learning Styles in the ESL/EFL Classroom. Heinle & Heinle Publishers, International Thomson Publishing Book Distribution Center, 7625 Empire Drive, Florence, KY 41042. 1995. Saito, Hidetoshi. "EFL classroom peer assessment: Training effects on rating and commenting." Language Testing 25.4 (2008): 553-581.
  32. 32. Sources Assessment Basics and Concepts http://www.celt.iastate.edu/teaching/cat.html http://www.cmu.edu/teaching/assessment/assesslearning/index.html http://www.cmu.edu/teaching/assessment/index.html Assessment Strategies https://www.eduweb.vic.gov.au/edulibrary/public/teachlearn/student/activity4_4A. pdf http://wvde.state.wv.us/teach21/ExamplesofFormativeAssessment.html http://www.scsk12.org/scs/subject-areas/esl/pdfs/hurleys-esl-modifications.pdf Rubrics http://www.schrockguide.net/assessment-and-rubrics.html http://edtechteacher.org/index.php/teaching-technology/assessment-rubrics http://www.nwic.edu/assessment/AssessmentResources/rubrics/InstructionRubri c.pdf

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