SlideShare a Scribd company logo
1 of 40
Download to read offline
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY
PREPARED FOR:
RAMSEY COUNTY REGIONAL RAILROAD AUTHORITY
PREPARED BY:
HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
NOVEMBER 2010
2 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 3
Contents
Executive Summary....................................................................................................................................................... 4
Introduction: The Union Depot Opportunity ...........................................................................................................11
A Critical Site for Downtown Saint Paul
Downtown Development Context.............................................................................................................................15
Assessing Development Potential.............................................................................................................................16
Challenge: Creating External Demand
Opportunity: A Distinctive Destination
Case Study: San Francisco Ferry Building Marketplace
Recommended Development Program....................................................................................................................22
Using Programming to Enhance Demand
Options for Site Development
Development Implementation ...................................................................................................................................28
Maximizing the Opportunity for Success
Maximizing the Economic Benefits of Union Depot: Transit + Programming...................................................34
Recommended Plan of Action...................................................................................................................................37
4 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
VISIONUnion Depot will become a
transit hub filled with a
diverse mix of businesses and
cultural programming.
Investment in the reestablishment of transit uses at
Union Depot and the restoration of this historic building
will provide a new platform for growth in Saint Paul.
Several new and existing transit lines will serve the
region through the building, and its leasable areas and
monumental civic spaces can serve as a vibrant new
civic hall with an active front plaza – the next great
public space for downtown Saint Paul. It will be a hub
of activity for trains and buses, bikes, automobiles and
the Saint Paul skyway system, and can also be one for
downtown workers at the end of their day, for
Lowertown residents looking for culture and an active
urban lifestyle, and for families and visitors from
throughout the city and across the region looking for a
new opportunity to come downtown.
In addition to a multimodal transit hub, Union Depot will
be a public space surrounded by dozens of acres of
developable land – strategic redevelopment sites for
both the City and County, upland in Lowertown and
across much of the downtown riverfront. Over the years
to come, transit riders will help activate the building as
riders board and alight trains or change modes of
transit through the station. Nonetheless, Union Depot’s
remarkable civic spaces also provide an opportunity to
complement and augment transit services by creating a
distinctive destination for culture, entertainment, retail,
and other public services that bring a broader array of
people into the building and into downtown from
across the Twin Cities – a mission that will be core to
the success of the project in fulfilling the four goals
established for this Union Depot Activation and
Development Strategy:
 To ensure Union Depot becomes a vibrant and
inviting place for transit riders first and foremost, as
well as for downtown residents, employees, and the
entire Twin Cities region;
 To provide a revenue stream to support and sustain
Union Depot operations;
 To maximize the economic benefits of Union Depot
redevelopment; and
 To engender the continued growth of Lowertown as a
diverse cultural destination and a unique place to
live, work, and visit.
Union Depot should house a distinctive marketplace
and host an intensive schedule of public programs, to
complement its transit services. Based on a robust
market analysis that included assessment of local
demographics and real estate markets, incorporated
findings from the Downtown Station Area Plans and
other recent downtown planning efforts, and
considered best practices in other cities, HR&A
recommends the development of a mix of retail, event
and civic uses in the Union Depot building that could
include up to 95,000 square feet of retail and
programmed civic space, home to a regular schedule
of arts, cultural, and entertainment programs that help
drive traffic to and through the building.
This development program will complement the
transportation mission of Union Depot, and encourage
additional civic and economic activity in the building. It
is a concept has been implemented with great success
for the adaptive re-use of several transit hubs across
the country, including San Francisco’s Ferry Terminal,
New York’s Grand Central Terminal and Washington,
DC’s Union Station, among others. It is a strategy
based in part on the success of these precedents, but
also on the underlying market potential of Lowertown,
targeted to achieve a vision that is uniquely Saint Paul.
Through a phased approach to redevelopment,
beginning with the reactivation of the Union Depot
building as a monument to 21st Century infrastructure
and the people of the Metro region, Ramsey County
and the City of Saint Paul have the opportunity to
realize all four goals of this Activation and
Development Strategy.
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 5
Conceptual Reuse Program
Union Depot Building Program
Program Area Square Feet %
Permanent Tenant Areas 24,700 13%
Basement Parking or Tenant Space 31,900 17%
Great Hall 10,100 5%
Concourse 4,900 3%
Waiting Room 22,800 12%
Transit Infrastructure & Services 90,900 49%
Total 185,300 100%
Front Plaza & Lawn 41,100
*Estimated based on design development plans; subject to change through future planning
**Headhouse subbasement and other parking areas not included
6 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
UNION DEPOT CAN BE…
A multimodal transit hub for millions of transit
riders annually. Beginning with Amtrak and local and
regional bus lines in 2012, the Central Corridor Light
Rail in 2014, and plans for high speed rail and several
other regional rail lines in the decade to come, Union
Depot will be the premier multimodal transit hub in the
Twin Cities region. Ridership is expected to top 4
million people each year within 25 years. The project
also includes new and enhanced infrastructure for
cyclists and pedestrians, along with ample space for
public parking.
A catalyst for economic development. Preliminary
projections show that the transportation components of
the Union Depot project recently approved for
construction by the Ramsey County Regional Railroad
Authority, can deliver nearly $565M in economic
benefits throughout the region over the next 25 years.
Nonetheless, these benefits can be substantially
augmented through the establishment of a diverse mix
of permanent users and temporary programs in the
building’s civic spaces. As documented in several other
cities and other transit hubs, large civic buildings
activated by destination programming and retail uses
have become signature urban amenities that attract
residents, employers and visitors; some have resulted in
double-digit percentage increases in surrounding
property values. If filled with permanent uses and
temporary events that complement and enhance transit
services and the unique character of Lowertown – arts
and cultural programs, restaurants and sustainable
agricultural products, and locally-based small
businesses – Union Depot can also add hundreds of
jobs and result in significant property value increases,
beyond the baseline benefits of transit.
A new anchor for a Lowertown Market District.
The Saint Paul Farmers Market – just one block from
Union Depot – has become a signature asset for
Lowertown, attracting upwards of 20,000 people on a
Rendering of Union Depot and the Central Corridor Light Rail from Wacouta and Fourth Streets. (RCRRA).
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 7
given weekend and more than a half million people
each year. The Union Depot building has the capacity
to develop a distinctive small-tenant marketplace that
complements this Twin Cities destination for fresh
produce with artists, restaurants, prepared foods and
other locally-owned small businesses and entrepreneurs
seeking to start new companies or expand business
lines. Such a diverse marketplace – part of a larger
tenant mix and programming strategy for Union Depot
– would bring more traffic into the Depot building to
support retail demand and leasing values, while also
driving additional foot traffic to the farmers market
and businesses throughout Lowertown. Retailers and
other small businesses from throughout Saint Paul and
Ramsey County, representing not only the farm-based
businesses that have shown excess demand for stalls at
the farmers market, but also local arts, culture, and
prepared foods, can be designed to complement the
Farmers Market and Lowertown business community.
They can help provide a vibrant station environment
and amenities for transit riders while also inducing new
demand for transit services at Union Depot,
encouraging ridership outside of regular commuter
hours. While a Union Depot marketplace might start
small, with select market days or programs, done right
and managed by experienced leadership, it could
grow into a permanent market destination for
downtown and Ramsey County as part of a larger
Lowertown Market District.
A hub for arts, culture and entertainment. Union
Depot can become a centerpiece for Lowertown’s high
profile arts community, cultural programming, and
burgeoning entertainment district. Its front lawn and
interior civic spaces can be filled with arts and cultural
uses and events, as well as restaurants and bars that
add critical mass to the Lowertown Entertainment
District. Events, organized programming, and art
exhibitions can be designed and promoted to bring
diverse audiences from local, regional, and global
constituencies that will drive demand for leasable
space. Combined with a distinctive destination events
venue, Union Depot can also become a premier
entertainment and cultural hub in the Twin Cities.
A site for new jobs, homes, and visitors. Greater
accessibility through mass transit connections and a
catalytic development program in the historic Union
Depot building can help turn surface parking lots and
other sites throughout Lowertown and on the Union
Depot property into new mixed-use transit-oriented
development. Augmenting a transit hub with amenities
for residents and workers can lay a foundation for
private investment for decades to come – investment
that will produce new jobs, provide homes for new
residents, and attract new visitors from near and far.
A critical link for riverfront redevelopment.
Positioned below the bluffs of downtown Saint Paul
and stretching nearly to the Lower Landing, the Union
Depot building provides the greatest potential
connection to the riverfront. It lies at the heart of the
17-mile-long Great River Park, currently the subject of
a major master planning initiative. Its programming
and development can become a destination arts,
culture, and food stop along this new signature
economic development initiative for the City, while also
enhancing the value of dozens of acres of government-
owned property stretching from the Bruce Vento
Nature Sanctuary to the Science Museum of Minnesota.
Appropriately redeveloped, it can be a catalyst for
the regeneration of the city’s waterfront, as other cities
have experienced with comparable projects.
_____
Union Depot can be all of these things for Ramsey
County and the City of Saint Paul, but concerted action
will be needed to make these ideas a reality. As the
infrastructure is laid for Union Depot’s new transit
services, a development and stewardship platform must
be built to ensure Union Depot becomes a vibrant civic
asset for the people of Saint Paul and the region that
maximizes Ramsey County’s return on investment.
8 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
Rendering of the Union Depot Waiting Room with modern pavilions that could be used for market tenants. (RCRRA).
Rendering of the Union Depot multimodal transit hub project at night. (RCRRA).
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 9
ACTIONRamsey County and the City
of Saint Paul should develop
a public-private partnership
to spearhead Union Depot
programming and leasing,
adopting a phased approach
for success.
Large-scale city-changing development initiatives like
the Union Depot project have benefits that last for
generations and accrue over time. Those projects that
have been most successful focus on a great first phase
of development; the initial years after the ribbon is cut
are often critical to building momentum for the long-
term success of the project. Bringing people into the
building in early years can induce new transit ridership
while also driving new foot traffic to Lowertown
businesses. It can create a vibrant place – an amenity
that people want to live near and around which
employers want to locate.
Ramsey County has taken the first and most pivotal
step in this plan for success: it has committed to the
restoration of the Union Depot building and the
improvement of its site for new transit services; it has
provided the physical platform for growth. Now, with
less than two years before the building is reopened to
the public and the first Amtrak trains rolls into the
station, there are three overarching initiatives that can
help ensure Union Depot becomes a vibrant and
inviting place that encourages transit ridership,
generates revenue to sustain its operations, and
catalyzes economic and real estate development for
Ramsey County and the City of Saint Paul, while
leveraging private resources to the greatest extent
possible to maximize the benefit of public funds.
1. Pursue public-private partnership
implementation of Union Depot programming and
development. While the core transit functions of the
Depot should remain with the Ramsey County Regional
Railroad Authority, private entrepreneurship can help
the County define a realistic development business plan
and realize the greatest public benefit from the project
with the least public cost. Ramsey County should
identify a private not-for-profit or for-profit
development partner through a well-marketed
solicitation process that results either in the designation
of an existing organization as a master-lessee of the
Depot’s programmable space or the creation of a new
special-purpose not-for-profit entity.
2. Pursue efforts to improve the marketability of
the Union Depot building and site. A new
connection from the Waiting Room to the riverfront, a
new anchor tenant for the Union Depot site, a
commitment to the development of a signature linear
park along the Train Deck, all could improve the
chances of attracting a top-quality development
partner for Union Depot. These are but three of a host
of measures outlined in this report that Ramsey County
should pursue to make the site more attractive to
potential developer partners.
3. Establish the parameters for public
programming and the use of civic space. Arts,
cultural, entertainment, educational, and market
programming can help make Union Depot a destination
for residents, workers, and visitors throughout the Twin
Cities, activating the building’s impressive civic spaces,
inducing demand for transit services, and creating
demand for retail and other leasable areas in the
station complex. RCRRA must define the parameters
for the use of spaces within the station complex to
maximize development flexibility while not
encumbering the station’s core function as a multimodal
transit hub.
_____
Ultimately, RCRRA must act swiftly and efficiently to
ensure that Union Depot is an activated, inviting public
place when the station opens in 2012 and as it builds
momentum as the premier transit hub in the region.
10 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
Union Depot’s historic Waiting Room has the capacity to become a vibrant civic gathering place – a flexible space for rentals and
development, with small-business public marketplace that complements and augments its function as a mass transit waiting room for
the 21st Century. (HR&A)
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 11
Introduction: The Union Depot Opportunity
Union Depot presents a once-in-a-generation
opportunity for Ramsey County and the City of Saint
Paul. As the economy begins to emerge from the
recession, multiple levels of government are making an
investment that will yield substantial returns for
decades to come. The Union Depot construction project
recently approved by RCRRA will have three direct
legacies imperative to downtown development and
local, regional, and national economic growth:
 Multimodal Transit Infrastructure: The reactivation of
Union Depot as a multi-modal transit hub will create
a new gateway to Saint Paul for the 21st Century.
Amtrak, local and intercity buses, the Central
Corridor Light Rail, and ultimately several other
transit lines, combined with significant improvements
to bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure in downtown,
will provide alternative means of transportation for
millions of commuter and leisure trips every year,
fostering the sustainable long-term growth of the
Metro region, and making it a more attractive place
to live, work, and play.
 A Monumental Civic Building: The Union Depot
investment includes a meticulous restoration of the
landmark 1920 Charles Sumner Frost building, listed
on the National Register of Historic Places. In
addition to serving as a grand gateway to the Twin
Cities, Union Depot can provide a new platform for
economic, cultural and community development to
enhance its mass transit benefits. The monumental
Waiting Room – half the size of a football field –
and the Guastavino-tiled Concourse will be reopened
to the public for the first time since the 1970s. These
distinctive spaces will have substantial capacity for
public and private use that complement and augment
multimodal transit hub functions. In the historic
Headhouse, the Great Hall can continue to serve as a
destination event venue for the region while also
becoming a flexible public space for Lowertown and
the downtown office community – a new “living room”
for Saint Paul. These expansive interior public
spaces, combined with a newly expanded front
plaza and lawn, offer a significant opportunity to
create a vibrant civic gathering place that catalyzes
private investment in tens of thousands of square feet
of potential tenant spaces within the building and on
numerous development sites throughout downtown.
 A Catalyst for Economic Growth and a Site for Long-
Term Development: The Union Depot project will
create jobs, augment real estate values, and enhance
the economic competitiveness of downtown Saint Paul
and communities connected to transit throughout the
region, with estimated economic benefits of nearly
$565 million over the next 25 years. Moreover, in
addition to serving as a catalyst for new investment
and development in downtown, the Union Depot site
itself presents a significant opportunity for long-term
downtown growth, covering approximately ten
percent of the entire land area of downtown Saint
Paul; enough land to support the project’s
transportation infrastructure as well as potential
development sites for future buildings. At the
intersection of Lowertown and the Mississippi River,
Downtown and the region, the site holds the long-
term potential for new homes and new jobs for the
City and County.
This Activation and Development Strategy concentrates
on a central element for Union Depot’s success: the
redevelopment of Union Depot real estate as an
unparalleled civic asset for the people of Saint Paul
and the entire Twin Cities region. It addresses:
 The development context that will influence Union
Depot redevelopment;
 The site’s development potential, including challenges
for serving transit riders and opportunities for making
the most of the Union Depot investment, based in best
practices from comparable projects;
 How Ramsey County and the City of Saint Paul can
establish an organizational and financial structure to
advance station development that complements and
supports the Depot as the premier multi-modal transit
hub in the region with vibrant civic and economic
activity; and
 The potential economic benefits of the Union Depot
project, and a strategy for maximizing benefits to
City, County, and region.
12 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
The public sector owns nearly the entire downtown riverfront in Saint Paul, shaded in yellow. Dozens of acres of development sites
within this area are owned by Ramsey County, while the United States Post Office owns a 750,000 square foot building
immediately to the west of Union Depot. The Depot building istelf lies at the center of the riverfront, granting the opportunity for a
significant development project to catalyze new development all along the riverfront, and on several strategic development sites
throughout downtown identified in the Downtown Station Area Plan, outlined above. (HR&A, Google Earth)
The historic Union Depot building will be restored to its former glory and expanding with a new entrance pavilion along Kellogg
Boulevard and a new loading dock facility. Although the 35-acre Union Depot site will include new rail tracks and platforms for
both rail and bus services, a significant portion of the site will be available for future vertical development as markets rebound and
and Lowertown matures with more amenities, including transit and other uses in the Depot building itself. (HR&A, Google Earth)
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 13
A Critical Site for Downtown Saint Paul
The 35 acres that Ramsey County acquired for the
Union Depot project represent approximately ten
percent of the entire land area of downtown Saint Paul
and approximately one-third of the downtown
riverfront. Its assets lie at the heart of Saint Paul’s
past, present, and future economic growth: it was the
confluence of the railroads and river boats at the site
that gave rise to the historic warehouses of Lowertown;
it is the restoration of the building and introduction of
Amtrak, buses, and light rail that are powering job
creation and creating a platform for growth in this
challenging economy; and it will be the confluence of
transit lines planned for the future that will continue to
augment Saint Paul’s ability to attract new jobs,
residents, and visitors.
Investments made today in the Union Depot building
and on its site will lay the groundwork for decades of
economic development. The planned program of the
transportation project can be considered as three
interrelated elements: transit infrastructure and
services, restored station spaces, and site work.
Transit Infrastructure and Services: Ultimately, Union
Depot is planned to provide 4 rail platforms leading to
8 passenger rail tracks, a major facility for intercity
and local buses, a welcome mat for the terminus of the
Central Corridor Light Rail, a bicycle facility, more than
650 parking spaces, and enhanced infrastructure for
pedestrians and cyclists across the site. Each of these
uses will have a presence in the Union Depot building
and on its surrounding land. While all of these
program elements are expected to materialize in the
next 25 years, they will be implemented incrementally,
with Amtrak, bus, and cyclist facilities opening in 2012,
the Central Corridor Light Rail debuting in 2014, and
additional regional rail lines following soon thereafter.
Restored Station Spaces: The Union Depot construction
project will include a detailed restoration of the historic
building and its front plaza. Major building areas
include:
 Approximately 25,000 square feet of permanent
tenant space in existing building spaces;
 Nearly 40,000 square feet of interior civic spaces,
including an expansive 300-foot by 80-foot column-
free Waiting Room, a nearly 5,000 square foot
Concourse with historic Guastavino ceilings, and a
10,000 square foot Great Hall;
 A one-acre front plaza, closed to automobile traffic
and reconfigured to welcome pedestrians.
 Nearly 32,000 square feet of basement space with
the potential for conversion to leasable area.
 Approximately 90,000 square feet of in-building
transportation infrastructure uses and services.
Site Work: Around the Union Depot building, the site
stretches from Sibley Street to the Bruce Vento Nature
Sanctuary, between Kellogg Boulevard and the
privately-owned freight rail lines that border the
southern edge of the site. This land covers more than
30 acres and will include a rehabilitated train deck
with a distinctive edge that leads to the nature
sanctuary, and at-grade parking for more hundreds of
cars. Some of this land can be made available to new
vertical construction in the years to come, as most
recently envisioned in the Downtown Station Area Plan.
14 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
Downtown Development Market Highlights
0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
1/2 Mile from
Union Depot
City of Saint
Paul
Downtown Saint
Paul
City of
Minneapolis
Downtown
Minneapolis
East Metro 7-County Metro
Area
13-County
Metro Area
Twin Cities Population Growth Rate, 2000-2009
Leading Lowertown Office Industries
 Software & Technology
 Professional Services
 PR & Advertising
 Art & Design
 Non profits
 Smaller government service companies
Food & Beverage Retail Momentum
 Barrio Tequila Bar
 Bin Wine Bar
 The Bulldog
 Faces Mears Park
 Heartland Restaurant & Farm Direct Market
 Vines and Steins
New Residential Development, 2000-2009
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 15
Downtown Development Context
Downtown Saint Paul has seen the beginnings of an
urban renaissance over the last decade. Although
downtown still struggles to attract office tenants and
rents for both office space and retail have recently
fallen, residential uses downtown have shown signs of
promise – a critical first step for downtown
revitalization. From 2000-2009, Lowertown was one
of the fastest growing areas in the entire region, with a
rise in population of nearly 23%. Estimates show that
more than 4,500 people now live within ½-mile of
Union Depot, and that they are becoming increasingly
diverse, with Asians and Latinos the two fastest
growing segments of the population. Two thirds of the
neighborhood is non-family households, with an
average household size of 1.5 individuals per home.
Per capita income has grown by 35% to nearly
$43,000. Home prices downtown doubled, with the
creation of 2,265 housing units, and over the last few
years, this development has helped spawn several new
restaurants and bars, particularly in Lowertown.
Over the next decade, American cities will compete to
attract the two fastest growing segments of the
population: people in the 25-39 and 55-74 age
cohorts. Numerous studies have shown these age
cohorts increasingly choose to live in dense, urban
locations where amenities and culture are within
walking distance, and where their carbon footprint can
be minimized. According to one recent study, 77% of
Generation Y homebuyers and renters plan to live in a
central urban location. Office employers in growing
service sectors will increasingly choose urban locations
to cater to the best and brightest within this group. The
core neighborhood assets that have driven Lowertown’s
growth over the last decade consistently rank among
the top factors for young singles and couples’ location
decisions, which in turn influence employers’ decisions.
These same assets will continue to form the foundation
for the next chapter of Lowertown development:
 The Saint Paul Farmers’ Market provides the local,
organic foods and the kind of vibrant urban place
that is in high demand among those seeking urban
lifestyles.
 Vibrant Public Spaces, including Mears Park, which
has become a world-class urban amenity, complete
with a running stream, diverse plantings, and a
bandshell that hosts frequent cultural programs, as
well as the Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary, perhaps
the only nature sanctuary in a downtown anywhere in
America, which provides a pastoral park for the 21st
Century within walking distance.
 A Robust Artist Community, many of whom live and
work in buildings around Union Depot, have created
a cultural destination in Lowertown, with galleries,
public sculpture, and active programming.
 Historic architecture and loft-style apartments
provide a housing form that caters to this
generation’s desire for change from the suburbs.
The Union Depot multimodal transit hub project will
provide an important next step for this neighborhood’s
development, connecting it to the region with mass
transit, reducing residents’ and workers’ car
dependence, and making the area a more
environmentally-friendly place to live and work. It can
support the development of a critical mass of venues
for the burgeoning Lowertown Entertainment District
and can enhance downtown’s ability to attract major
office tenants. Moreover, it can also provide a
significant link to Saint Paul’s riverfront, which is
currently the subject of a major master planning
initiative – the Great River Park project.
A market analysis produced for the 2009 Downtown
Station Area Plan and updated for this project
identifies potential demand for approximately 5,000-
7,000 new homes in downtown over the next three
decades, along with more than 1.8 million square feet
of office space, 100,000-150,000 square feet of
retail, and up to approximately 300 hotel rooms.
Nonetheless, Lowertown will still need to develop more
amenities to attract more people to live, work, and
play in the neighborhood – this lack of amenities is
consistently cited as one of the most pressing
neighborhood needs, and the pace at which they are
developed will be directly correlated to the pace of
new development in downtown. The development of
new amenities for residents and office workers,
including both service businesses and public
programming, can be a central element of Union Depot
to help advance this downtown development context.
16 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
Transit Service Implementation Timeline Assessing Development Potential
The Union Depot investment will yield three types of
real estate development opportunities:
 In-Station: Development of transit-serving retail and
other revenue-producing uses and public programs in
the Union Depot building;
 On-site: Development on the additional 30 acres of
land that Ramsey County owns around the historic
building; and
 Surrounding parcels: Development and
redevelopment of public and private lands in the
surrounding neighborhood, including dozens of acres
of County-owned land along the riverfront to the
west of Union Depot.
Each of these development areas must be considered
as a function of local real estate development markets
– they each have long-term development potential, in
line with trends in the growth of Lowertown and
downtown Saint Paul, but have varying degrees of
development potential in the near term while credit
markets are still tight and demand for new product
remains low.
However, development in the Union Depot terminal
building itself creates an additional consideration:
Union Depot will open in late 2012, marking the
beginning of its new life as a restored multimodal
transit hub. From this point on, the project’s success will
be measured not only by the amount of transit service
it provides, but also the quality of the multimodal hub
experience, the amenities it provides transit riders, and
its ability to foster economic activity and growth in
downtown Saint Paul and the region.
Phase I: 2012
Amtrak
Greyhound
Jefferson Lines
Metro Transit
Phase II: 2014
Central Corridor Light Rail
Phase III: 2015-2030
High Speed Rail
Duluth Intercity Rail
Eau Claire Intercity Rail
Red Rock Commuter Rail
Rush Line Corridor
Rochester Intercity Rail
Mankato Intercity Rail
Gateway Corridor
Riverview Corridor
Robert Street Corridor
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 17
Challenge: Creating External Demand
The challenge for developing transit-serving retail and
creating a vibrant station for transit riders will be to
create a destination that brings people to the building
for retail and entertainment programming that
complement mass transit services. An analysis of
multimodal transit hubs around the country reveals that
while transit riders create a certain amount demand for
in-station retail, this demand will fall well short of Union
Depot’s capacity.
Stations that rely on demand primarily from transit
riders can support approximately one square foot of
retail for every 1,100 annual riders. In other words, a
station that serves 1 million riders each year can
support approximately 900 square feet of retail –
perhaps one general store that sells coffee,
newspapers, soft drinks, and other goods to serve mass
transit riders. Although this correlation can serve as a
general rule of thumb, there are exceptions, depending
on the particular locational and use characteristics of a
given station.
For example, Union Station in Dallas, Texas, which
serves passengers from Amtrak, local and intercity
buses, and multiple commuter rail lines, does not have
any retail to serve its 4 million annual riders. Station
developers have attempted to provide retail services
for these riders – from coffee stands to a general store
to a shoe shine – without success; station developers
says commuters are well served by these amenities in
and around suburban stations where they board transit
in the morning, and retailers have not perceived an
opportunity to capture demand from these commuters
on their way home for such retail as groceries or
restaurants.
On the other hand, some multimodal hubs support retail
well in excess of this typical ratio of 1,100 riders per
square foot: stations such as New York’s Grand Central
Terminal, Union Station in Washington, DC, and the
Ferry Building on the San Francisco waterfront have
each created dynamic retail destinations with active
programming to attract demand from residents and
workers in their surrounding communities.
Union Depot ridership is projected to be
approximately 4 million by 2035, likely supporting
approximately 4,000 square feet of transit-serving
retail, or approximately one-quarter of the existing
tenant areas on the building’s main floor and less than
15% of the total existing tenant areas in the building.
Moreover, this demand will materialize incrementally
* Dallas Union Station has 4 million annual riders but no retail space.
*
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
3500
Annual Multimodal Hub Riders per Square Foot of Retail
Mean
18 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
over the next twenty five years only as new transit
services at the Depot come online.
Absent the attraction of significant external demand, it
will be challenging for RCRRA to provide basic retail
services for Union Depot transit riders. When the
station opens in 2012, its ridership will be
approximately 175,000, much of which will be on
Amtrak trains that depart early in the morning and
arrive late at night. By 2014, when the Central
Corridor Light Rail opens, ridership is expected to
grow to approximately 925,000, yielding potential
transit-serving retail demand of approximately 900
square feet. However, these riders will board and
alight in front of the building on Fourth Street and may
not have reason to enter the historic building itself.
Moreover, Union Depot’s expansive indoor civic spaces
will also create a challenge and opportunity for RCRRA
and the City: they are too big for transit riders alone.
Unless other people are given a reason to come to the
building, these spaces are at risk of becoming
desolate, with little contribution to – and potentially
negative impressions for – the transit rider experience
and economic development for the city or region.
Multimodal transit hubs across the country have an
average of 300-850 annual riders per square foot of
civic space. Union Depot will have three times this
amount of space, considering the projected ridership
for 2035. Before additional transit services are
introduced, this ratio of transit riders to civic space will
be substantially lower – less than 5 annual riders per
square foot in 2012, and approximately 25 riders per
square foot even after the Central Corridor Light Rail
rolls into the station.
Union Depot’s success as a civic space and vibrant
transit hub depends on bringing non-transit riders into
the building. If Union Depot is to achieve its goal of
creating a vibrant place that not only serves the needs
of its transit riders, but also encourages growth in
ridership, RCRRA must aggressively pursue a strategy
that creates demand for people to come to the
building for reasons other than transit, and to spend
money while they are there. Building these
constituencies that encompass broader segments of the
population can help induce additional demand for
transit, creating a vibrant station environment and a
leisure destination at the confluence of the region’s
transit services.
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
Annual Multimodal Hub Riders per Square Foot of Civic Space
Median
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 19
Opportunity: A Distinctive Destination
Despite these challenges, Union Depot will be one of
the most impressive civic spaces in the Twin Cities. Its
expansive civic spaces and renewed front plaza create
a tremendous opportunity for RCRRA to consider a
combination of temporary, interim, and permanent
programming for the Depot that:
 Activates the building to create a more welcoming
environment for transit customers and enhance the
array of retail and other services available to them;
 Generates revenue both by filling leasable area
within the Depot and by attracting more transit
customers with vibrant, activated civic spaces and a
pleasant commuter experience;
 Provides amenities to the growing downtown
residential community and supports the development
of a critical mass of restaurants and entertainment
venues in Lowertown;
 Strengthens the relationship between transportation,
downtown riverfront recreation and Lowertown
residents, artists, and entertainment opportunities;
 Respects and enhances the historic architecture of the
Depot; and
 Creates value for surrounding development parcels,
including RCRRA-owned land.
Other multimodal hubs around the country have
leveraged comparable civic space resources for real
estate and economic development purposes. Where
transit riders no longer fill the monumental spaces of
the stations from the Union Depot era, station
developers have repurposed these spaces to their
advantage. From the expansive spaces of Grand
Central Terminal and the Washington, DC, Union
Station, to the smaller-scale spaces of Union Station in
Dallas or the San Francisco Ferry Building (see case
study on following page), these distinctive spaces have
been the centerpiece of major redevelopment efforts.
The first critical question for the success of Union Depot
is: what combination of temporary, interim, and
permanent programming will maximize external
demand to meet the project’s objectives?
Grand Central Terminal’s Vanderbilt Hall hosts a wide
variety of public and private events that serve as a
destination within the station for surrounding workers as well
as residents throughout the city and region. Here, it hosts a
squash tournament. (Suzy Allman)
In San Francisco’s Ferry Building Marketplace, the buildiing
was reconfigured around a long central nave that serves as
both a public gathering place and a main street for the
building’s small-shop retailers and food service providers.
(Aaron Kohr)
20 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
Case Study: the San Francisco Ferry Building
Marketplace
San Francisco’s Ferry Terminal – a multimodal transit
hub on the city’s waterfront served by ferries, buses,
light rail, and Amtrak – has succeeded by creating a
unique retail marketplace in the city, attracting workers
and residents from the downtown core, gourmet and
local food shoppers from throughout the city, and
tourists from across the country and around the globe.
Mission: To develop a retail destination to enhance a
multimodal transit hub, amenitize office space, and
bring people to the waterfront.
Programming: The Ferry Building Marketplace has
succeeded by drawing on demand from San
Francisco’s major farmers market and creating a
permanent home for retailers and restaurateurs
inspired by the market’s focus on food from the Bay
Area. A diversity of local uses helps establish a
distinctive destination that can attract people from
local, regional, and global constituencies, while four
large restaurants, a private events space, and office
tenants create a diversified stream of revenue that can
maintain stability.
Design: The developers of the marketplace made
significant changes to the building’s interiors and
waterfront façade, carving a new public “nave” that
serves as the building’s central organizational axis,
with a double-loaded retail corridor of small, open
storefronts and frequent entrances and exits.
Management: The Ferry Building was developed by
Wilson Meany Sullivan, a San-Francisco-based
developer, and Equity Office Properties, owner of one
of the largest portfolios in the country. Equity Office
manages the property through a lease with the San
Francisco Port Authority, while the outdoor farmer’s
market, which activates the building’s exterior and
brings people inside, is operated by a separate not-
for-profit organization.
(onlyinsanfrancisco.com)
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 21
Funding: The $110 million private development project
leveraged approximately $30-40 million in public
infrastructure funds surrounding the building, and was
financed by the projected value of the office space in
the building and the strength of the Equity Office
balance sheet. Retail development was initially
perceived as speculative given low levels of foot traffic
along the waterfront and the psychological divide
lingering from the elevated Embarcadero Freeway.
Timing: The San Francisco Port Authority first
attempted to redevelop the Ferry Building in the mid-
1970s. After its initial failed attempt, the 1989 Loma
Prieta earthquake that precipitated the demolition of
the freeway helped make a new redevelopment effort
possible. A request for development proposals ten
years later led to the selection of a developer that
would take nearly six years to complete the project.
Three years later, more than thirty years after the
initial development attempt, and a decade after the
second, the Ferry Building marketplace became the
fifth most visited tourist destination in the city.
Economic Benefits: The Ferry Building’s distinctive retail
environment has created a more attractive atmosphere
for the building’s mass transit customers and – more
significantly for local economies and public benefit –
helped activate the waterfront for pedestrians and
cyclists, making this new frontier of the city’s
development a premier destination not only for tourists,
but also for high-value office jobs. The pier adjacent
to Ferry Building is now home to the San Francisco
headquarters of Bloomberg LP and commands the
highest office rents in the city. Its developers note that
that building’s success – and even its development –
would not have been possible without the innovative
redevelopment of the Ferry Building.
The building underwent major renovations, as its historic
spaces were augmented for a modern program. (Equity
Office)
The marketplace creates a vibrant civic space in the Ferry
Terminal, with a double-loaded corridor of small-space
tenants. (Aaron Kohr)
The plaza in front of the building is activated on a regular
basis with public markets and cultural programming. (Ed
Anderson)
22 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
Recommended Union Depot Development Concept
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 23
Recommended Development Program
Driven by the four goals for Union Depot development
identified at the beginning of this study, the unique
development opportunities and challenges inherent to
the Union Depot site and Lowertown, and best
practices from comparable projects across the country,
HR&A recommends RCRRA adopt a reuse strategy for
Union Depot that includes a diverse mix of civic,
cultural, entertainment, and retail uses in the building
first and foremost, to serve as a catalyst for
surrounding development and increased transit
ridership. The program – a comprehensive
“marketplace” concept, built on the top quality
products and programs distinctive of Saint Paul and the
Twin Cities, within a top quality work of Saint Paul
architecture – should include:
 A mix of locally-based tenants in approximately
25,000 square feet of permanent tenant spaces, with
the option for expansion into the Headhouse
basement, and potential use of space within the
subbasement for support – tenants that can
complement the Farmers Market and Lowertown
businesses, creating more opportunities to bring
people downtown; Examples of such complementary
tenants could include vendors of local products that
are restricted from the existing Market, but that
showcase the best of the region,
 An event space in the Great Hall, comparable to, but
more robust than, the current use by Christos’
Restaurant, with opportunities for events to occupy
the front plaza, Concourse, and potentially other
Union Depot spaces;
 Expansion of leasable areas into the building’s civic
spaces, including for restaurant tables and other uses
in the Great Hall, as well as for the development of
a small-tenant public marketplace in flexible, high-
quality and historically-sensitive market pavilions in
the Waiting Room – uses that can activate the space
and provide revenue without compromising its public
nature or transit functions; and
 Significant public programming throughout the
building’s civic spaces and front plaza, including
regularly scheduled events that bring local residents
and workers into the building on a weekly basis, and
larger exhibitions and festivals that attract a
broader array of visitors from throughout the Twin
Cities and the region.
Ultimately, this program can yield up to approximately
95,000 square feet of potential rentable areas within
the Union Depot building, as well as the programming
and retail activation of the front plaza, to support and
be supported by transit uses. It aims to generate the
demand necessary for Union Depot development
success the same way other civic spaces have been
activated and retail projects developed in comparable
situations: by drawing on local, regional, and global
constituencies.
Recommended Areas for Program Development
Program Area Square Feet
Great Hall Tenants 12,500
Concourse 2,200
Waiting Room 900
Concourse 2nd Floor 5,900
Headhouse Basement 3,200
Headhouse Basement Parking or Other Tenant 31,900
Potential Permanent Tenant Areas 56,600
Great Hall 10,100
Concourse 4,900
Waiting Room 22,800
Total Civic Space for Programming & Rentals 37,800
Total Building Area for Program Development 94,400
Front Plaza & Lawn 41,100
*Estimated based on design development plans; subject to change through future planning
**Headhouse subbasement and other parking areas not included
24 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
Tapping into Lowertown’s Programming Success
Saint Paul Farmers Market (HR&A)
The Saint Paul Farmers Market: This public programming
initiative for a site owned by the City of Saint Paul can bring
more than 25,000 people to Lowertown on a given Saturday,
averaging 20,000 visitors each weekend from April through
November. Not only has this market been pivotal to the
resurgence of Lowertown, most recently creating the impetus
for a significant private investment in the 18,000 square-foot
Heartland Restaurant and Farm Direct Market, but it has also
supported more than 150 farm-based businesses from the
Twin Cities region.
The Saint Paul Art Crawl: This festival showcasing the best of
the region’s artists brings 40,000 people to Lowertown
during two weekends each year and helps reinforce
Lowertown’s status as ground zero for contemporary culture
in Saint Paul.
Twin Cities Jazz Festival: Now in its 12th year in Mears Park,
this lively music event draws more than 75,000 people to
Lowertown each year.
Music in Mears: Over the last six years, this regularly
scheduled concert and movie series in Mears Park has
expanded from 4 shows during the summer to 12.
Concrete and Grass: Initiated just three years ago by the
Ordway’s Arts Partnership and Mayor Chris Coleman’s office,
this new music festival features on two stages in Mears Park.
Twin Cities Jazz Festival in Mears Park (razoo.com)
Using Programming to Enhance Demand
Where cities have too few residents or workers to
support new retail development or to activate new
public spaces, distinctive destination programming –
both in terms of retail merchandising and, more
significantly, cultural and entertainment events – have
become the primary driver of demand. From
temporary events and festivals like the Twin Cities Jazz
Festival in Mears Park or the Winter Carnival, to
regularly scheduled happenings like the Saint Paul
Farmers Market or Music in Mears, to privately-
produced programs like concerts at Barrio or art shows
at Black Dog, these programming initiatives have been
produced by investors both public and private to bring
people to emerging neighborhoods, and to cultivate a
stable base of customers. Their key to success has been
drawing on demand from layered geographies:
 Local: Any programming initiative must serve local
constituents first and foremost – in this case, the
nearly 80,000 residents and workers of Lowertown,
downtown, and the Capitol District. Investors
recognize that although these users may be smaller in
number, and sometimes in purchasing power, they are
the most frequent and reliable customer base. Their
presence creates an aura of authenticity – that a
particular program is of the community or
neighborhood in which it is produced. Once
developed and stabilized, this local base of
constituents for a given program or place helps
ensure its long-term vibrancy and sustainability.
 Regional: Building on a local base, investors try to
attract a more regional audience – in this case,
residents throughout the City of Saint Paul, Ramsey
County, Minneapolis, and potential day-trippers from
across the region. Although it is more difficult to
attract people in this group, and they come to
programs less frequently, their numbers are much
larger, they will be connected to Union Depot by
every major form of transportation, and they
generally spend substantially more (a study in Saint
Paul found that cultural program attendees from
throughout the region spend more than twice the
amount per program than local users, including
nearly twice the amount on meals and three times the
amount on program-related goods).
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 25
 Global: When programming is truly exceptional, its
demand profile is expanded to visitors from across
the country and throughout the world, as local and
regional users bring their extended families, friends,
and business partners to see their favorite hometown
events and places. These out-of-towners are often
prepared to spend even more per trip than regional
constituents and bring the added benefit of civic or
project brand development as they tell their friends
at home about their trip. Successful public places
and programs – from destination parks to large-
scale festivals – can attract up to one quarter or
more of all visitors from these “global” constituents.
Saint Paul has begun to have great success in
leveraging its public spaces and City-owned land for
public programming over the last decade.
Approximately 6.5 million people came to downtown
Saint Paul in 2008 for cultural programs and major
events. People come to Lowertown in particular not
only to visit, but also to live and work because of the
neighborhood’s focus on fresh food, fresh art, and fresh
culture within a distinctive setting of historic architecture
and the lush Mears Park. These programs include
attractions for people from the neighborhood and the
Twin Cities as a whole, with occasional events like this
year’s Saint Paul Poetry Slam that bring people from
across the country. Moreover, Lowertown’s small
business owners and neighborhood artists are also
producing programs in their own spaces as private
entrepreneurs. For example, Barrio, Black Dog,
Bulldog, and other local retailers sponsor concerts and
exhibitions to bring in customers, while artists host
Lowertown First Fridays in five of the neighborhood’s
studio buildings and three different art galleries on the
first Friday of every month.
Union Depot will succeed in creating and capturing
external demand the same way these other Lowertown
places have: by producing dynamic public programs
that cater to local, regional, and global constituencies
and providing an outlet for the spending potential
generated by these programs.
Ultimately, RCRRA should pursue a development
program for the Union Depot building focused on the
best of Lowertown: intensive cultural programming and
a high quality small business marketplace. The
recommended flexible development program –
structured as a highly interactive mix of uses that
optimizes the building’s architecture and is intended to
engender a vibrant station environment during morning,
afternoon and evening – will serve as a first phase of
Union Depot development. It is an ambitious vision to
enhance transit services and catalyze mixed-use
transit-oriented development on soft sites throughout
Lowertown, as well as RCRRA’s dozens of acres of
riverfront property both to the east and west of the
Depot building. But it is also a vision that is pragmatic:
it optimizes the use of the building’s impressive
architecture and civic spaces, creating opportunities
both for activation and increased revenue; it maximizes
the opportunity for RCRRA to leverage the private
entrepreneurship that has helped countless comparable
projects succeed across the country, enhancing
opportunities for capturing demand from layered
geographies; and it allows RCRRA to focus on its core
mission of providing the best transportation services
that Union Depot can offer, without diluting the civic
purpose of the project.
Union Depot’s Front Plaza can be activated with programs that bring people downtown and into the building. (RCRRA)
26 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
This distinctive colonnade can become the heart of a signature urban park stretching from Lowertown and Union Depot to the Bruce
Vento Nature Sanctuary. (HR&A)
The Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary, a spectacular new park at the eastern edge of the Union Depot site. (HR&A)
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 27
Options for Site Development
While the reuse of the Union Depot building should be
aggressively pursued for its catalytic potential, RCRRA
should maintain a flexible approach to future vertical
construction on the site, with two particular
enhancements to current design-build plans to organize
and catalyze future development. Based on best
practices both in Saint Paul and around the country, as
well as the unique attributes of RCRRA’s 30-acre site
surrounding the Union Depot building, HR&A
recommends RCRRA begin to two mutually supportive
options for developing the site in the near future to
create additional value for its property and for
Lowertown and downtown as a whole:
 A new signature linear park. Current Union Depot
designs include an elevated bike path along the
northern side of the train deck. This concept should
be expanded. The edge of the train deck east of
Broadway, with its distinctive industrial colonnade
and wide truck ramps, presents an ideal opportunity
for a new destination linear park both on top of and
below the elevated deck. Cities across the country
have been seeking opportunities for the creation of
such linear and elevated parks since the world-
renowned High Line Park opened in New York City
last summer, and, like the High Line, this portion of the
Union Depot site provides a distinctive industrial
remnant that is already endowed with a lush planted
area that has grown over the years.
Such a development would not merely be a park for
civic benefit, however; it would also serve as a value
creator for Union Depot’s developable area, as well
as for Lowertown. The practice of utilizing parkland
as a value generator for master-planned
developments is nearly two centuries old, and the
phenomenon has grown ever more important as
downtown real estate developments seek to compete
with their suburban counterparts. Indeed, both major
master-planned developments in downtown Saint
Paul over the last decade – Wacouta Commons and
Upper Landing, which accounted for half of all new
downtown housing construction during this period –
leveraged public investments in parkland during their
initial phases, and success in attracting major
corporate tenants has also focused on downtown’s
spectacular urban parks. RCRRA should actively
pursue strategies to make this portion of the site a
destination in its own right, as well as a critical
connection to the Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary and
a new element in the Great River Park project, while
also adopting a design that is sensitive to the historic
value of the train deck, which is eligible for listing on
the National Register of Historic Places.
 A new development site for an anchor. The area
adjacent to the new Kellogg Boulevard entrance
pavilion, between its eastern edge and the bus ramp
at Broadway, should be considered for new vertical
development. This site, which might include the use of
air rights over a portion of the bus waiting platform,
is larger than the footprint of the Headhouse and
could be of significant future development value to
RCRRA. It could be endowed with a direct indoor
connection to Union Depot (and the entire skyway
system of downtown Saint Paul) through the new
entrance pavilion, and would also be a site that could
house floorplates larger than any other building in
the immediate area.
Although many potential users will likely be eager to
develop this site in the long-term, RCRRA should
target an anchor institutional or commercial that can
serve as catalysts in their own right, providing a
stable base of users of the Union Depot building and
infusing new activity along Kellogg Boulevard. One
potential user group that was suggested by the local
redevelopment corporation in the past – an
expansive higher education facility – could be a
particular boon to the site and should be pursued
aggressively, although other large-scale tenants
would also be of substantial value in activating the
site and serving as a value-creator for downtown
Saint Paul and the remainder of RCRRA’s property.
In the interim, before an anchor tenant can be
attracted to this site, RCRRA can leverage this
expansive portion of the deck for temporary
programming. It is an ideal site for temporary
outdoor public markets that can help bring new
activity into the building, and it might also be used
for larger civic festivals and site rentals, as the train
deck was when Cirque du Soleil came to Saint Paul.
28 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
Development Implementation
RCRRA is implementing the Union Depot multimodal
transit hub project and is best positioned to manage
and maintain the project’s transit infrastructure, in part
through agreements with transit service providers. In
analyzing potential implementation structures for the
development and stewardship of the recommended
Union Depot development program, HR&A evaluated
the extent to which different mechanisms and entities
met the following criteria imperative to the success of a
project like Union Depot in the short-, medium-, and
long-term:
 Create a great first phase of development. The
development schedule of the Union Depot
transportation project establishes parameters for the
timing of development implementation: the station will
open in late 2012, garnering widespread publicity
and marking the official beginning of Union Depot’s
new life; two years later, the Central Corridor Light
Rail is scheduled to bring nearly one million people to
Union Depot’s doorsteps every year; and in the
decades to come, several other transit connections
are slated to serve the Depot. This timeframe, set by
the transportation projects that are at the heart of
Union Depot’s revitalization, creates implications for
development phasing, particularly in light of the
current economic environment. As evidenced by other
comparable projects, the extent to which these initial
years of redevelopment are successful will be
directly related to the long-term success of the
project in meeting stated goals. Different
implementation structures bring different capacities to
achieve a great phase I by the time the station is
operational.
 Maximize revenues and minimize costs to RCRRA.
The Union Depot building is expected to cost up to
$1.5-2.3 million annually to maintain, based on
preliminary projections provided by RCRRA. The
capacity to offset these costs with revenues derived
from uses in the Depot building will be a result of the
implementation entity’s ability to optimize the
development program, attracting quality tenants and
effectively managing the building’s programs as a
critical business venture for the success of the Union
Depot project – both in terms of serving transit riders,
and complementing and catalyzing new development
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 29
RCRRA
Master
Lessee
Public-Private Partnership
RCRRA
Tenants
Baseline Scenario
in downtown. Nonetheless, maximizing revenues,
especially in early years of operation, may also be
tied to the organization’s capacity to win grants and
philanthropy from both government and institutional
players, as is typical of public markets and highly
activated urban civic spaces.
 Preserve long-term development flexibility. As new
transportation connections are planned at the Depot,
RCRRA will require flexibility of the site’s design and
management responsibilities in order to
accommodate potentially unforeseen needs of these
new users. As local and national economies improve,
the economics of site development will change. As
downtown and Lowertown continue to develop, local
constituencies, politics, and economic development
policies may proscribe alternative uses for the
undeveloped portions of the site. Decisions made in
the near future about stewardship structure will have
significant impacts on RCRRA’s ability to maintain its
desired level of programmatic flexibility and fiscal
control in the decades to come.
Guided by these three criteria, the overarching goals
for the Union Depot project, and best practices from
other comparable projects, HR&A recommends RCRRA
pursue a public-private partnership structure to guide
implementation of the Union Depot development
program in the building. Private entrepreneurship,
guided by specific public aspirations, will provide the
most efficient means for maximizing Union Depot’s
benefits and the greatest opportunity for eliminating
RCRRA’s building management costs over time, while
also allowing RCRRA to maintain long-term flexibility
for the site.
RCRRA should structure a master-lease agreement for
real estate development components in the Union
Depot building. Master-leasing approximately 95,000
square feet or more of the Union Depot building will
minimize RCRRA’s cost obligation for the operations
and maintenance of the building, while also providing
its private partner with the flexibility necessary to
make development within the building work. By
master-leasing this space to a third party, RCRRA can
reduce its operations and maintenance costs by more
than 40%, or approximately $540,000 each year,
based on third-party management costs.
Conceptual Responsibility for Union Depot
Operations & Maintenance Costs
Although entering into a master-lease agreement
provides the greatest opportunity to meet Union Depot
project goals, RCRRA will have to establish parameters
for potential uses, new construction, and maintenance
responsibilities within this 95,000 square foot master-
lease, as well as parameters for activating and
deriving revenues from the site outside this master-
leased area. For example, a development agreement
will have to include provisions to ensure the Waiting
Room is optimized for its transit functions, while also
being used as an activity and revenue generator, and
that allow RCRRA’s private sector partner to make the
best use of the Union Depot site for programming and
space rentals.
$760,000 $730,000
$210,000
$1,270,000
30 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
Conceptual Real Estate Development Economics
(stabilized year)
$500,000
Conceptual Net Annual Revenue from Leasable Area
$180,000+
Annual Net Revenue from Parking
(does not include parking under the train deck)
$250,000
Conceptual Master-Lessee Building Management Costs
(Net of subleasable areas;
front plaza maintenance not included)
$1.5 - $4.0+ million
Order-of-Magnitude Capital Required
HR&A’s conceptual analysis demonstrates that through
a public-private partnership for real estate
development within the building, RCRRA’s partner and
master-lessee could achieve nearly $500,000 in
revenue from triple-net-leased space upon
development stabilization, if the lessee is able to use
portions of the Waiting Room and Great Hall as
rentable area – for restaurant seating, retail kiosks,
and market pavilions, as well as temporary events.
Significantly more revenue could be achieved should
the developer create sufficient demand for space in
the Headhouse basement to produce more revenue
than parking uses. Revenues from parking across the
entire site, currently approximately $180,000
annually, net of operating fees, with significant room
for growth both in terms of rates and pending demand,
can also be used to create a financial structure
attractive to private investors, while still preserving
RCRRA’s flexibility for new construction in the future ,
should the need or market arise. Although these
revenues may take several years to stabilize, they
should be sufficient to cover the master-lessee’s annual
operating costs – including the cost of providing public
programming – within its first 5-10 years of
operations.
Significantly, capital costs for implementing new real
estate uses in the building will be limited, thanks to the
substantial investment being made to restore the Union
Depot building. This project will yield a building with
significant leasable area delivered as “white box”
space, complete with basic utility infrastructure for
tenants. While this space will be prepared to begin
leasing to potential Union Depot tenants, certain
additional improvements may be required to expand
leasable areas and maximize the leasability of the
Union Depot building. On an order-of-magnitude
basis, these costs could be less than $1.5 million or up
to $4 million or more, including typical tenant
improvement allowances, depending on the final
building program selected and spaces to be used,
based on preliminary projections provided by the
Union Depot design-building team.
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 31
There are two ways that RCRRA can ensure the success
of the Union Depot development project through a
public-private partnership structure:
 Option 1: Issue a competitive solicitation and
encourage a range of not-for-profit and for-profit
developers to respond. Although competitive
solicitation process would require substantial
marketing of the project to potential developers and
stewards both locally and nationally, it would
encourage entrepreneurship in assessing the specific
revenue generating and programming opportunities
necessary to achieve RCRRA’s vision for Union Depot.
This structure could also result in a swift and efficient
implementation process, if qualified development
partners are enticed to respond, leading to a great
first phase of development. It would also maximize
the amount of private investment generated from the
Union Depot project in the next few years.
The challenge with such a structure, however, is that
there may be a lack of qualified respondents as a
result of the current development climate and the
distinctive mix of uses the Depot will house, which
require a sophisticated development organization.
Moreover, developers – particularly profit-oriented
organizations – may request an amount of control
over the building that is less favorable to RCRRA,
potentially including a long-term lease and
development rights outside the Union Depot building.
Significant outreach to potential local and national
development partners could mitigate this risk.
 Option 2: Create a new private not-for-profit
development organization in partnership with the
City of Saint Paul, local business leaders, and
institutional and foundation sponsors. Creating a new
not-for-profit entity to implement the Union Depot
development program can maximize RCRRA’s ability
to maintain control over the development and
programming of the building, both through
representation on its board of directors, and through
a potentially shorter master-lease term, with more
flexible provisions to allow RCRRA to change certain
parameters of the rights of the master lease. Such a
structure would also have the additional advantage
of a direct relationship with the County and City that
would create certain leverage for the pursuit of
sponsorships and foundation and philanthropic grants
for public market development and programming in
the building, as well as grants from State and
Federal government resources.
However, it is generally quite challenging for a
government organization to create and foster the
entrepreneurship that Union Depot needs, as
implementation quality relies on a sophisticated
development organization. If RCRRA and the City
chose to pursue the creation of s special-purpose not-
for-profit for real estate development and
programming in the Union Depot building, it would
require a powerful board of directors, filled with
high-profile business and civic leaders, and the
recruitment of highly talented executive leadership.
This task of creating a new organization would also
require additional start-up funds for the hiring of new
staff. Moreover, even if such an organization could
be efficiently structured and the right team put in
place, it is likely that RCRRA would risk becoming the
funder of first resort if a subsidy were required or if
revenues fall short of initial projections.
Either structure can work financially. HR&A’s analysis
indicates that over approximately 10-15 years, the
recommended Union Depot development concept
should generate sufficient revenues to cover
implementation costs, as well as operations and
maintenance of a significant portion of the Depot on
a triple-net-lease basis, and the provision of
substantial public programming. The extent to which
this program will be successful, however, will be
directly correlated to both the quality of the entity
chosen to steward Union Depot development, and the
capacity of that organization to leverage grants and
other public funding sources and programs during the
implementation process.
In either scenario, however, this public-private
partnership should be limited to the Depot building; it
will be prudent for RCRRA to maintain control over
the surrounding site as infrastructure needs may shift
over time. Moreover, preservation of the site for
future development will allow momentum in the Union
Depot building and on surrounding sites in Lowertown
to create additional value for RCRRA’s in the years to
come, as markets rebound and mature.
32 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
A direct connection between the Union Depot Waiting Room
and Saint Paul’s riverfront parks system can enhance both of
these economic development assets for the City and County,
allowing people to move more easily from train station to
riverfront and bringing additional foot traffic and spending
power into the Depot and Lowertown as a whole. (HR&A)
Maximizing the Opportunity for Success
Regardless of which implementation approach proves
most viable – a lease to an existing development
organization, or the creation of a new one – there are
several ways RCRRA can make the site more attractive
to potential partners and investors, including:
Site Improvements and Considerations
 A direct connection from the Waiting Room to the
Riverfront. Two previous plans for the area, one
adopted by the City and the other presented by the
Lowertown Redevelopment Corporation, have
envisioned bridges from the end of the Waiting
Room over the freight rail tracks to Lower Landing.
Although a bridge may prove quite difficult for the
site, the idea of connecting the Waiting Room to
Lower Landing is powerful: it would encourage the
flow of traffic through the Waiting Room – the most
difficult of Union Depot’s spaces to activate –
bringing additional spending power through Union
Depot and increasing the likelihood of retail success.
A direct connection between the southern end of the
waiting room and the riverfront below can therefore
create significant economic value for the project. If a
bridge is not feasible, RCRRA should explore
alternative connections such as from the southern end
of the Waiting Room to the riverfront below the
freight railroads, through the former Warner Road
loading dock.
 Commitment to linear park development and anchor
tenant attraction. The two recommended
improvements to the Union Depot site outside of the
building footprint – the establishment of a signature
linear park that has the potential to lead to the Bruce
Vento Nature Sanctuary, and the attraction of a
major anchor tenant for new vertical construction
adjacent to the Kellogg Boulevard entrance pavilion
– would improve the value of the site for potential
investors by bringing additional foot traffic and
disposable income to the area, as well as create an
additional marketing opportunity. An RCRRA
commitment to realizing these visions could help
effectively market the project to investors.
 Flexibility for the use of civic spaces and for building
signage. The ability of potential private partners to
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 33
help RCRRA fulfill its vision for Union Depot will
depend in large part on the rights that can be
established for the use of civic spaces and site areas.
The Depot’s primary function is that of a multimodal
transit hub and real estate uses or public
programming should not be allowed to disrupt this
core function. However, transit ridership is expected
to use only one-third of interior civic spaces by 2035,
leaving ample room for uses that complement and
augment transit services. Nonetheless, RCRRA must
clearly define the parameters for reuse that will
allow the building to function as a multimodal transit
hub and that give potential investor partners
assurance of their development rights. Since the
building is also a monumental civic edifice, designed
as a railroad station and not a marketplace
development venture, potential investor partners will
need a level of assurance that they can outfit the
building with historically-sensitive retail signage.
Business Planning Refinement
 A marketplace vendor demand analysis and
feasibility assessment. The success of Union Depot’s
retail program may depend to a large extent on the
supply of high-quality small-business marketplace
tenants that desire to open or expand their business
in Union Depot. Since marketplace development is
often locally-driven, particularly for public markets, a
more detailed assessment of the potential for
establishing one in Union Depot – from temporary or
seasonal markets to a year-round permanent market
– could both augment demand for the space by the
development community and attract other
government and philanthropic funds.
 Letters of interest from potential tenants. There are
several potential tenants that could add value to
Union Depot both as a civic asset and as a
development venture, including a permanent bicycle
store and facility, an outlet of the Twin Cities Model
Railroad Museum, and an office and visitors center
for the National Park Service, whose presence could
enhance connections to the Great River Park. While
RCRRA should not commit to any particular tenant
before selecting a partner, letters of interest could
also help market the project to potential investors.
Financial Tools and Public Funds
 Legacy Amendment Funding. This landmark state
program, supported by an increase in the state’s
sales tax of three-eighths of one percent, has four
separate funds, three of which should be considered
to support Union Depot’s potential capital needs and
ongoing operating expenses: the Arts and Culture
Heritage Fund, targeted to arts, arts education, and
arts access, as well as to preserve Minnesota’s history
and cultural heritage, is expected to provide $54.5
million in grants in 2011, and would be well-suited to
the recommended program for Union Depot
development; the Parks and Trails Fund, estimated to
be $39 million in 2011, is intended to support parks
and trails of regional or statewide significance, and
could support the development of Union Depot as a
critical component of the state’s current premier park
initiative, Great River Park; and the Clean Water
Fund, estimated to be approximately $91 million in
2011, is intended to protect, enhance, and restore
water quality in lakes, rivers, and groundwater, and
could be leveraged for Union Depot’s public realm
development projects and linear park connection to
the Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary.
 Government grants. There are several sources of
grants from the federal government that can be used
for the development and operations of public
markets, including from the Departments of
Commerce, Housing and Urban Development,
Treasury, and Agriculture. Exploration of these
funding sources, and a commitment to aggressively
pursue them can help bring potential public market
developers to the table. Other grants secured from
City, County, and State governments will also
increase the project’s chances for success
 Low-cost loans. RCRRA or the County or City could
choose to make low-cost loans available to its
implementing partner to ease the burden of the
capital costs and other start-up funds required for
project success.
34 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
Summary of Economic Benefits from
Union Depot’s Transit Infrastructure
($ millions, discounted at 7%)
Source: AECOM
Maximizing the Economic Benefits of Union
Depot: Transit + Programming
The Union Depot multimodal transportation hub project
is estimated to produce significant economic benefits to
Ramsey County and the City of Saint Paul. In addition
to reducing vehicle miles traveled by more than 150
million annually by 2034 and saving commuters more
than 630,000 hours of travel time each year – valued
at nearly $12 million – an analysis by AECOM
concluded that the present value of the project’s
development benefits in Ramsey County will be nearly
$450 million, and that total economic activity in the
region will be nearly $565 million as a result of the
project. These benefits include the construction of the
Union Depot transit hub and the ongoing operations of
its transit infrastructure, as well as the construction of
projected development of more than 1,600 units of
housing and nearly 1,600 new office and retail jobs.
Although these projections are significant, they are
based purely on the reactivation of the Depot as a
multimodal transit hub; they do not consider the value
that the recommended real estate activation and
development strategy within the building can have on
local economies.
The Center for Transportation Studies at the University
of Minnesota notes that the value increment of transit
occurs not just from accessibility, but rather from
accessibility to “desired destinations.” Without
significant development and programming in and
around the building, the Union Depot project will solve
accessibility challenges, but will do little else to make
Lowertown, downtown and the county more of a
desired destination. The core development concept
recommended for the Union Depot building – a
distinctive mix of locally-based small-businesses
combined with significant public programming – is
driven not only by market factors that show the
potential for development success, but also by its
capacity to maximize the economic development
benefits and catalytic potential of the Union Depot
project, drawing on the power of cultural programming
and public markets for success.
Economic Benefits
Ramsey
County Region
Union Depot Construction $27.7 $109.7
Union Depot Operations $5.6 $7.9
Surrounding Development
Construction $10.7 $42.3
Permanent Jobs in Surrounding
Development $404.9 $404.9
Total $448.9 $564.8
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 35
Leveraging Culture for Economic Development
Cultural programming has been proven to generate
new economic activity and fiscal revenues in Saint Paul.
The nonprofit arts industry alone generated more than
$184 million in audience spending in 2004 – spending
that helped the industry support more than 8,200 full-
time jobs in the city, generate $243 million in
household income to local residents, and produce $35
million in local and state government revenues. The
Winter Carnival in downtown produces between $3.5
and $5 million in economic activity each year. These
programs also have a profound impact on civic
engagement and local pride: More than 13,400
volunteers donated nearly 300,000 hours to the city’s
nonprofit arts and culture organizations in 2004.
Artist communities and the spaces they occupy also
have significant impacts on property values. This story
has rung true from the artist revitalization of New
York’s SoHo neighborhood to downtown development
around the music and arts scene in downtown Austin,
Texas, to medium and small-sized cities across the
country. Lowertown has become a prime example of
this arts-oriented economic development: a recent study
found that the opening of the artist spaces in the Tilsner
Artists’ Cooperative had an impact $20,000-$25,000
– 16-19% – per residential unit within a one-mile
radius of the property. The neighborhood’s success in
this regard was most recently lauded by Chairman of
the National Endowment for the Arts, Rocco Landesman,
who called Lowertown “Exhibit A” for how “art works”
in developing local economies.
Although development of new small businesses is often
farther along the regeneration curve, arts districts are
also becoming attractive neighborhoods for
restaurants, retailers, and the companies of creative
class service economies, as employers try to attract the
best and brightest talent through neighborhood culture
and amenities. This phenomenon has been particularly
true in Lowertown, where the primary office tenancies
are in software and technology, professional services,
public relations and advertising, arts and design,
nonprofits, and smaller government service companies
– industries whose employees are often attracted to
the types of arts and cultural amenities on offer in the
neighborhood.
The Tilsner Artists’ Cooperative in Lowertown, an ArtSpace
project, has had double-digit impacts on surrounding
property values, according to a recent study, through its
provision of space for local artists. (mnartists.org)
Patrons of the Saint Paul Art Crawl enjoy a multifaceted arts
and cultural space at Peach Gallery in Lowertown, which
National Endowment for the Arts Chairman Rocco Landesman
called “Exhibit A” for the arts as an economic driver of
downtown revitalization. (HR&A)
36 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
Public Markets: Driving Local Economic Growth
Public markets exist – and have existed for thousands
of years – to provide local goods producers an outlet
to sell the fruits of their labor. They are small business
incubators – places where entrepreneurs can go to
start or expand retail and wholesale business ventures.
But they are also a form of programming for public
space – the most productive place-makers of the
business world. They create vibrant, active civic spaces
that attract people from all social, geographic, racial,
and economic strata.
It is hard to overstate the economic development
potential of vibrant public markets. Although few data
exist on the quantitative economic benefit of public
markets, these benefits can generally be described as:
 Small Business Development and Job Creation: Public
markets tap into demand for small business creation
and expansion. For example, Pike Place Market in
Seattle was home to the first locations of Starbucks,
Sur la Table, and other national retailers; it currently
houses an average of 1,900 jobs annually, producing
3,600 more throughout the region.
 Real Estate Value Increments: Public markets add
value to surrounding properties both as vibrant public
spaces and as amenities for residential, office, hotel,
and retail spaces. This value creation potential was
most recently seen in Lowertown, where the farmers
market helped create an impetus for Heartland
Restaurant to invest in 18,000 square feet adjacent
to the market.
 Increased Local Spending: Public markets provide
opportunities to keep spending local, allowing the
City and County to capture a greater percentage of
the region’s spending capacity as market goers buy
products and services produced in the local economy.
They engender a virtuous cycle for local and regional
economic development.
 Augmented Fiscal Revenues: Ultimately, the new
businesses, jobs, residents, and spending reinforce
local tax rolls. New revenue is generated from sales
taxes, property taxes, business and income taxes,
hotel taxes, and other local government revenue
sources, including public parking lots and ramps. A
study of Pike Place Market found that properties in
the market area generated approximately $3.9
million in local tax revenues in 2002.
These clear economic and fiscal benefits that can be
attributed to the development and operation of public
marketplaces accrue in addition to their often more
substantial, if less quantifiable, cultural and social
impacts. These vibrant urban places and showcases for
local products have significant potential to build civic
pride and encourage healthy, sustainable lifestyles;
social benefits that make public markets frequent
recipients of government and philanthropic grants.
Nonetheless, public markets can also often support
higher leasing revenues than baseline rents command,
due to their spatial configurations, management
structures, and ability to establish critical mass in and
of themselves.
For the Union Depot project, a public marketplace
would have an additional level of impact: done right, a
public market would complement and drive traffic to
the Saint Paul Farmers Market and Lowertown
retailers. This phenomenon has been at the heart of
the revitalization of downtowns and neighborhoods
both large and small, as a critical mass of shopping
typologies creates an identifiable destination district.
A distinctive public market at Union Depot can help
establish a “market district” in Lowertown that increases
the demand profile for all Lowertown retail businesses.
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 37
Recommended Plan of Action
RCRRA should pursue four overarching steps to realize
this vision over the next two years, by the time the
ribbon is cut for the grand reopening of the Union
Depot building. These actions are outlined in the order
in which they should be taken, but all should commence
as soon as possible:
1. Define the parameters that will govern the master
lease of station areas, including parameters for the
development of new pavilions within the Waiting
Room and use of other civic spaces for leasing
and/or events. This task will require careful
planning with the design-build team and
conversations with future transit tenants. The goal
should be to maximize the flexibility of the
building’s civic spaces for uses that can complement
and augment transit uses. This task should be
complete by the beginning of 2011.
2. Commence significant outreach to potential master
lessees, including development organizations in
Saint Paul and the Twin Cities region, as well as
national and international development
organizations – both for profit and not-for-profit.
This project marketing task should be spearheaded
by leadership both from Ramsey County and the
City of Saint Paul, each of whom will be critical
players for the success of the real estate
development components of the project.
Discussions should be held with major not-for-profit
and for-profit development organizations, as well
as with potential partner institutions and
foundations that could provide additional support
or be interested in helping to establish a new
organization for Union Depot development.
3. Pursue efforts to make the project more
marketable, including those related to site
improvements, business planning for a public
marketplace, and potential financial tools for
project implementation listed earlier in this report.
4. Develop a solicitation process based on findings
from initial outreach to potential private partners.
A solicitation to potential developer partners
should be issued no later than the end of the
second quarter of 2011 in order designate a
development partner with sufficient time to
implement the first phase of the recommended
program by the time the building opens in late
2012. Should demand from existing development
organizations not come to fruition, explore the
creation of a new not-for-profit in partnership with
the City of Saint Paul and local business leaders,
philanthropists, and foundations.
38 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.
UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 39
Report Authors
This report was written by HR&A Advisors, Inc., whose
project team was led by President Eric Rothman and
Senior Analyst Daniel Hochman Fuchs. Its findings and
conclusions were developed by HR&A’s staff and a
team of local consultants that included:
 Cassidy Turley Martin Tucker, real estate market
consultants;
 Lake State Realty Services & Joe Urban, residential
real estate specialists;
 106 Group, historic preservation and development
consultants;
 The Bloom Companies, engineering consultants;
 Ehlers & Associates, leaders in public finance; and
 Urban Strategies, planning consultants.
Previous Plans Analyzed
The study considered several previous planning
documents for the station area, the riverfront, and
downtown, including, in chronological order:
 1994 – Lowertown Small Area Plan
 1997 – Saint Paul on the Mississippi Development
Framework
 2003 – LOCATE Task Force Report
 2005 – Downtown Development Strategy
 2005 – A Lens for the Future
 2005 – Urban Village Vision*
 2007 – Central Corridor Development Strategy
 2008 – Economic Development Strategy
 2009 – Downtown Station Area Plan
Stakeholder Consultations
The study included outreach to dozens of government
officials and civic leaders, as well as private
developers. Discussions held include, alphabetically:
 Capital City Partnership
 Capital River Council
 City of Saint Paul Councilmember Dave Thune
 City of Saint Paul Department of Planning &
Economic Development
 City of Saint Paul Office of the Mayor
 Dakota County Regional Railroad Authority
 Lowertown Entertainment District
 Lowertown Masterplan Task Force
 Lowertown Redevelopment Corporation
 Metropolitan Council
 Ramsey County
 Saint Paul Area Chamber of Commerce
 Saint Paul BOMA
 Saint Paul Riverfront Corporation
 Urban Land Institute-coordinated real estate
roundtable
 Washington County Regional Railroad Authority
40 HR&A ADVISORS, INC.

More Related Content

What's hot

Hempstead, NY Master Concept Plan submitted June 2011
Hempstead, NY Master Concept Plan submitted June 2011Hempstead, NY Master Concept Plan submitted June 2011
Hempstead, NY Master Concept Plan submitted June 2011Renaissance Downtowns
 
Ribbon Development With Case Study Of Aydin
Ribbon Development With Case Study Of Aydin Ribbon Development With Case Study Of Aydin
Ribbon Development With Case Study Of Aydin Pathik
 
Cradle City Master Plan 30 June 08 Phase 1
Cradle City Master Plan 30 June 08   Phase 1Cradle City Master Plan 30 June 08   Phase 1
Cradle City Master Plan 30 June 08 Phase 1ldavids
 
Capital Campaign Analysis Sample
Capital Campaign Analysis SampleCapital Campaign Analysis Sample
Capital Campaign Analysis SampleGeorge Dusenbury
 
RV 2015: Advocacy and Coalition Building: Fighting Transit Opposition by Mega...
RV 2015: Advocacy and Coalition Building: Fighting Transit Opposition by Mega...RV 2015: Advocacy and Coalition Building: Fighting Transit Opposition by Mega...
RV 2015: Advocacy and Coalition Building: Fighting Transit Opposition by Mega...Rail~Volution
 
Architecture and Town Planning _Unit 4_SPPU_Survey and Transportation Managem...
Architecture and Town Planning _Unit 4_SPPU_Survey and Transportation Managem...Architecture and Town Planning _Unit 4_SPPU_Survey and Transportation Managem...
Architecture and Town Planning _Unit 4_SPPU_Survey and Transportation Managem...Shrikant Kate
 
Nehru place placemaking project uttipec-sdmc_shakti
Nehru place  placemaking project uttipec-sdmc_shaktiNehru place  placemaking project uttipec-sdmc_shakti
Nehru place placemaking project uttipec-sdmc_shaktiuttipecDRAFT
 
PLANNING PRINCIPLES OF LE CORBUSIER – A CASE STUDY OF CHANDIGARH CITY
PLANNING PRINCIPLES OF LE CORBUSIER – A CASE STUDY OF CHANDIGARH CITYPLANNING PRINCIPLES OF LE CORBUSIER – A CASE STUDY OF CHANDIGARH CITY
PLANNING PRINCIPLES OF LE CORBUSIER – A CASE STUDY OF CHANDIGARH CITYYash Shah
 
Current Folio
Current FolioCurrent Folio
Current Folioagiusg
 
Detailed understanding of the master plan ar. m. senthil
Detailed understanding of the master plan  ar. m. senthilDetailed understanding of the master plan  ar. m. senthil
Detailed understanding of the master plan ar. m. senthilAr. M. Senthil [ senthilmani ]
 
Optimizing Urban Structure: Toward an Integrated New Urbanist Model - Evan Jo...
Optimizing Urban Structure: Toward an Integrated New Urbanist Model - Evan Jo...Optimizing Urban Structure: Toward an Integrated New Urbanist Model - Evan Jo...
Optimizing Urban Structure: Toward an Integrated New Urbanist Model - Evan Jo...Congress for the New Urbanism
 
PLANNING PRINCIPLES OF LE CORBUSIER – A CASE STUDY OF CHANDIGARH CITY”
PLANNING PRINCIPLES OF LE CORBUSIER – A CASE STUDY OF CHANDIGARH CITY”PLANNING PRINCIPLES OF LE CORBUSIER – A CASE STUDY OF CHANDIGARH CITY”
PLANNING PRINCIPLES OF LE CORBUSIER – A CASE STUDY OF CHANDIGARH CITY”Yash Shah
 
Satellite town planning
Satellite town planningSatellite town planning
Satellite town planningAnuj Kumar
 
GROWING THROUGH TRANSIT: a plan for transit oriented development in downtown ...
GROWING THROUGH TRANSIT: a plan for transit oriented development in downtown ...GROWING THROUGH TRANSIT: a plan for transit oriented development in downtown ...
GROWING THROUGH TRANSIT: a plan for transit oriented development in downtown ...John-Mark Palacios
 
Bus procurement
Bus procurement Bus procurement
Bus procurement AMIT BHARTI
 
Redeveloping Mumbai's Port Land - A People's Perspective
Redeveloping Mumbai's Port Land - A People's PerspectiveRedeveloping Mumbai's Port Land - A People's Perspective
Redeveloping Mumbai's Port Land - A People's PerspectiveMayuresh Bhadsavle
 

What's hot (20)

Urban Redevelopment
Urban RedevelopmentUrban Redevelopment
Urban Redevelopment
 
Hempstead, NY Master Concept Plan submitted June 2011
Hempstead, NY Master Concept Plan submitted June 2011Hempstead, NY Master Concept Plan submitted June 2011
Hempstead, NY Master Concept Plan submitted June 2011
 
Ribbon Development With Case Study Of Aydin
Ribbon Development With Case Study Of Aydin Ribbon Development With Case Study Of Aydin
Ribbon Development With Case Study Of Aydin
 
Cradle City Master Plan 30 June 08 Phase 1
Cradle City Master Plan 30 June 08   Phase 1Cradle City Master Plan 30 June 08   Phase 1
Cradle City Master Plan 30 June 08 Phase 1
 
Capital Campaign Analysis Sample
Capital Campaign Analysis SampleCapital Campaign Analysis Sample
Capital Campaign Analysis Sample
 
RV 2015: Advocacy and Coalition Building: Fighting Transit Opposition by Mega...
RV 2015: Advocacy and Coalition Building: Fighting Transit Opposition by Mega...RV 2015: Advocacy and Coalition Building: Fighting Transit Opposition by Mega...
RV 2015: Advocacy and Coalition Building: Fighting Transit Opposition by Mega...
 
Architecture and Town Planning _Unit 4_SPPU_Survey and Transportation Managem...
Architecture and Town Planning _Unit 4_SPPU_Survey and Transportation Managem...Architecture and Town Planning _Unit 4_SPPU_Survey and Transportation Managem...
Architecture and Town Planning _Unit 4_SPPU_Survey and Transportation Managem...
 
Nehru place placemaking project uttipec-sdmc_shakti
Nehru place  placemaking project uttipec-sdmc_shaktiNehru place  placemaking project uttipec-sdmc_shakti
Nehru place placemaking project uttipec-sdmc_shakti
 
PLANNING PRINCIPLES OF LE CORBUSIER – A CASE STUDY OF CHANDIGARH CITY
PLANNING PRINCIPLES OF LE CORBUSIER – A CASE STUDY OF CHANDIGARH CITYPLANNING PRINCIPLES OF LE CORBUSIER – A CASE STUDY OF CHANDIGARH CITY
PLANNING PRINCIPLES OF LE CORBUSIER – A CASE STUDY OF CHANDIGARH CITY
 
Current Folio
Current FolioCurrent Folio
Current Folio
 
Detailed understanding of the master plan ar. m. senthil
Detailed understanding of the master plan  ar. m. senthilDetailed understanding of the master plan  ar. m. senthil
Detailed understanding of the master plan ar. m. senthil
 
Redevelopment of public realm
Redevelopment of public realmRedevelopment of public realm
Redevelopment of public realm
 
Architecture Town And Planing Lecture
Architecture Town And Planing LectureArchitecture Town And Planing Lecture
Architecture Town And Planing Lecture
 
Optimizing Urban Structure: Toward an Integrated New Urbanist Model - Evan Jo...
Optimizing Urban Structure: Toward an Integrated New Urbanist Model - Evan Jo...Optimizing Urban Structure: Toward an Integrated New Urbanist Model - Evan Jo...
Optimizing Urban Structure: Toward an Integrated New Urbanist Model - Evan Jo...
 
SNEAPA 2013 Friday f4 10_30_what's my tod combined sneapa presentation
SNEAPA 2013 Friday f4 10_30_what's my tod combined sneapa presentationSNEAPA 2013 Friday f4 10_30_what's my tod combined sneapa presentation
SNEAPA 2013 Friday f4 10_30_what's my tod combined sneapa presentation
 
PLANNING PRINCIPLES OF LE CORBUSIER – A CASE STUDY OF CHANDIGARH CITY”
PLANNING PRINCIPLES OF LE CORBUSIER – A CASE STUDY OF CHANDIGARH CITY”PLANNING PRINCIPLES OF LE CORBUSIER – A CASE STUDY OF CHANDIGARH CITY”
PLANNING PRINCIPLES OF LE CORBUSIER – A CASE STUDY OF CHANDIGARH CITY”
 
Satellite town planning
Satellite town planningSatellite town planning
Satellite town planning
 
GROWING THROUGH TRANSIT: a plan for transit oriented development in downtown ...
GROWING THROUGH TRANSIT: a plan for transit oriented development in downtown ...GROWING THROUGH TRANSIT: a plan for transit oriented development in downtown ...
GROWING THROUGH TRANSIT: a plan for transit oriented development in downtown ...
 
Bus procurement
Bus procurement Bus procurement
Bus procurement
 
Redeveloping Mumbai's Port Land - A People's Perspective
Redeveloping Mumbai's Port Land - A People's PerspectiveRedeveloping Mumbai's Port Land - A People's Perspective
Redeveloping Mumbai's Port Land - A People's Perspective
 

Similar to Union Depot Development and Activation Framework

Destination SA Presentation slides 05 17-11 edit
Destination SA Presentation slides 05 17-11 editDestination SA Presentation slides 05 17-11 edit
Destination SA Presentation slides 05 17-11 editkalderete
 
Santa Monica Civic Center Mixed Use Arts & Cultural District
Santa Monica Civic Center Mixed Use Arts & Cultural DistrictSanta Monica Civic Center Mixed Use Arts & Cultural District
Santa Monica Civic Center Mixed Use Arts & Cultural DistrictHR&A Advisors
 
Long Term Integrated Community Facilities Plan 2015
Long Term Integrated Community Facilities Plan 2015Long Term Integrated Community Facilities Plan 2015
Long Term Integrated Community Facilities Plan 2015Council2016
 
Huntington Station, NY Development Strategy submitted April 2013
Huntington Station, NY Development Strategy submitted April 2013Huntington Station, NY Development Strategy submitted April 2013
Huntington Station, NY Development Strategy submitted April 2013Renaissance Downtowns
 
Huntington Station Development Strategy
Huntington Station Development StrategyHuntington Station Development Strategy
Huntington Station Development StrategyCSPM Group
 
City Council Approves Ordinance To Create People Plaza Program
City Council Approves Ordinance To Create People Plaza ProgramCity Council Approves Ordinance To Create People Plaza Program
City Council Approves Ordinance To Create People Plaza ProgramKristen Moreau
 
African village LA
African village LAAfrican village LA
African village LADOmar
 
City of Salina Brochure-Shared Vision Statement & Strategic Plan
City of Salina Brochure-Shared Vision Statement & Strategic PlanCity of Salina Brochure-Shared Vision Statement & Strategic Plan
City of Salina Brochure-Shared Vision Statement & Strategic PlanCity of Salina
 
Inner City Regeneration - Robin Carlisle
Inner City Regeneration - Robin CarlisleInner City Regeneration - Robin Carlisle
Inner City Regeneration - Robin CarlisleCape Town Partnership
 
Transportation as Revitalization Strategy
Transportation as Revitalization StrategyTransportation as Revitalization Strategy
Transportation as Revitalization StrategyJohn-Mark Palacios
 
Connecticut River Valley Commuter Rail Proposal
Connecticut River Valley Commuter Rail ProposalConnecticut River Valley Commuter Rail Proposal
Connecticut River Valley Commuter Rail ProposalEric Nielsen
 
PuttingPlacesFirst
PuttingPlacesFirstPuttingPlacesFirst
PuttingPlacesFirstCharles Tso
 
Columbus Smart City Challenge
Columbus Smart City Challenge Columbus Smart City Challenge
Columbus Smart City Challenge Urban SDK
 
Centergy Opportunity Zone Communities Summit
Centergy Opportunity Zone Communities SummitCentergy Opportunity Zone Communities Summit
Centergy Opportunity Zone Communities SummitAlex Rudie
 
Jasper Economic Development Plan draft
Jasper Economic Development Plan draftJasper Economic Development Plan draft
Jasper Economic Development Plan draftMatthew Crane
 
The Southend Vision Plan Final 2018
The Southend Vision Plan Final 2018The Southend Vision Plan Final 2018
The Southend Vision Plan Final 2018Scott Browder
 
Mayors-Council-Vision-Document-Mar-2015
Mayors-Council-Vision-Document-Mar-2015Mayors-Council-Vision-Document-Mar-2015
Mayors-Council-Vision-Document-Mar-2015Tamim Raad
 

Similar to Union Depot Development and Activation Framework (20)

Destination SA Presentation slides 05 17-11 edit
Destination SA Presentation slides 05 17-11 editDestination SA Presentation slides 05 17-11 edit
Destination SA Presentation slides 05 17-11 edit
 
Santa Monica Civic Center Mixed Use Arts & Cultural District
Santa Monica Civic Center Mixed Use Arts & Cultural DistrictSanta Monica Civic Center Mixed Use Arts & Cultural District
Santa Monica Civic Center Mixed Use Arts & Cultural District
 
TOD Honolulu
TOD HonoluluTOD Honolulu
TOD Honolulu
 
Long Term Integrated Community Facilities Plan 2015
Long Term Integrated Community Facilities Plan 2015Long Term Integrated Community Facilities Plan 2015
Long Term Integrated Community Facilities Plan 2015
 
Huntington Station, NY Development Strategy submitted April 2013
Huntington Station, NY Development Strategy submitted April 2013Huntington Station, NY Development Strategy submitted April 2013
Huntington Station, NY Development Strategy submitted April 2013
 
Huntington Station Development Strategy
Huntington Station Development StrategyHuntington Station Development Strategy
Huntington Station Development Strategy
 
City Council Approves Ordinance To Create People Plaza Program
City Council Approves Ordinance To Create People Plaza ProgramCity Council Approves Ordinance To Create People Plaza Program
City Council Approves Ordinance To Create People Plaza Program
 
Waukesha_Report 022916 Final
Waukesha_Report 022916 FinalWaukesha_Report 022916 Final
Waukesha_Report 022916 Final
 
African village LA
African village LAAfrican village LA
African village LA
 
Hollywood Road Corridor
Hollywood Road CorridorHollywood Road Corridor
Hollywood Road Corridor
 
City of Salina Brochure-Shared Vision Statement & Strategic Plan
City of Salina Brochure-Shared Vision Statement & Strategic PlanCity of Salina Brochure-Shared Vision Statement & Strategic Plan
City of Salina Brochure-Shared Vision Statement & Strategic Plan
 
Inner City Regeneration - Robin Carlisle
Inner City Regeneration - Robin CarlisleInner City Regeneration - Robin Carlisle
Inner City Regeneration - Robin Carlisle
 
Transportation as Revitalization Strategy
Transportation as Revitalization StrategyTransportation as Revitalization Strategy
Transportation as Revitalization Strategy
 
Connecticut River Valley Commuter Rail Proposal
Connecticut River Valley Commuter Rail ProposalConnecticut River Valley Commuter Rail Proposal
Connecticut River Valley Commuter Rail Proposal
 
PuttingPlacesFirst
PuttingPlacesFirstPuttingPlacesFirst
PuttingPlacesFirst
 
Columbus Smart City Challenge
Columbus Smart City Challenge Columbus Smart City Challenge
Columbus Smart City Challenge
 
Centergy Opportunity Zone Communities Summit
Centergy Opportunity Zone Communities SummitCentergy Opportunity Zone Communities Summit
Centergy Opportunity Zone Communities Summit
 
Jasper Economic Development Plan draft
Jasper Economic Development Plan draftJasper Economic Development Plan draft
Jasper Economic Development Plan draft
 
The Southend Vision Plan Final 2018
The Southend Vision Plan Final 2018The Southend Vision Plan Final 2018
The Southend Vision Plan Final 2018
 
Mayors-Council-Vision-Document-Mar-2015
Mayors-Council-Vision-Document-Mar-2015Mayors-Council-Vision-Document-Mar-2015
Mayors-Council-Vision-Document-Mar-2015
 

More from HR&A Advisors

Locating Office Product in Mixed-Use Projects & Neighborhoods
Locating Office Product in Mixed-Use Projects & NeighborhoodsLocating Office Product in Mixed-Use Projects & Neighborhoods
Locating Office Product in Mixed-Use Projects & NeighborhoodsHR&A Advisors
 
Affordability of Multifamily Flood Insurance in New York
Affordability of Multifamily Flood Insurance in New YorkAffordability of Multifamily Flood Insurance in New York
Affordability of Multifamily Flood Insurance in New YorkHR&A Advisors
 
The New York City Tech Ecosystem
The New York City Tech EcosystemThe New York City Tech Ecosystem
The New York City Tech EcosystemHR&A Advisors
 
Long Island's Needs for Multifamily Housing
Long Island's Needs for Multifamily HousingLong Island's Needs for Multifamily Housing
Long Island's Needs for Multifamily HousingHR&A Advisors
 
Economic Development Strategies for Los Angeles
Economic Development Strategies for Los AngelesEconomic Development Strategies for Los Angeles
Economic Development Strategies for Los AngelesHR&A Advisors
 
Finding the Value, Capturing it, and Putting it to Work
Finding the Value, Capturing it, and Putting it to WorkFinding the Value, Capturing it, and Putting it to Work
Finding the Value, Capturing it, and Putting it to WorkHR&A Advisors
 
Financing Equitable Transit-Oriented Development
Financing Equitable Transit-Oriented DevelopmentFinancing Equitable Transit-Oriented Development
Financing Equitable Transit-Oriented DevelopmentHR&A Advisors
 

More from HR&A Advisors (7)

Locating Office Product in Mixed-Use Projects & Neighborhoods
Locating Office Product in Mixed-Use Projects & NeighborhoodsLocating Office Product in Mixed-Use Projects & Neighborhoods
Locating Office Product in Mixed-Use Projects & Neighborhoods
 
Affordability of Multifamily Flood Insurance in New York
Affordability of Multifamily Flood Insurance in New YorkAffordability of Multifamily Flood Insurance in New York
Affordability of Multifamily Flood Insurance in New York
 
The New York City Tech Ecosystem
The New York City Tech EcosystemThe New York City Tech Ecosystem
The New York City Tech Ecosystem
 
Long Island's Needs for Multifamily Housing
Long Island's Needs for Multifamily HousingLong Island's Needs for Multifamily Housing
Long Island's Needs for Multifamily Housing
 
Economic Development Strategies for Los Angeles
Economic Development Strategies for Los AngelesEconomic Development Strategies for Los Angeles
Economic Development Strategies for Los Angeles
 
Finding the Value, Capturing it, and Putting it to Work
Finding the Value, Capturing it, and Putting it to WorkFinding the Value, Capturing it, and Putting it to Work
Finding the Value, Capturing it, and Putting it to Work
 
Financing Equitable Transit-Oriented Development
Financing Equitable Transit-Oriented DevelopmentFinancing Equitable Transit-Oriented Development
Financing Equitable Transit-Oriented Development
 

Recently uploaded

Shapoorji Pallonji Plots Jadhavgadh Fort Pune.pdf
Shapoorji Pallonji Plots Jadhavgadh Fort Pune.pdfShapoorji Pallonji Plots Jadhavgadh Fort Pune.pdf
Shapoorji Pallonji Plots Jadhavgadh Fort Pune.pdfabbu831446
 
Listing Turkey - Sinpaş Queen Bomonti Katalog
Listing Turkey - Sinpaş Queen Bomonti KatalogListing Turkey - Sinpaş Queen Bomonti Katalog
Listing Turkey - Sinpaş Queen Bomonti KatalogListing Turkey
 
Property Rental Cumbria Location and Price Guide
Property Rental Cumbria Location and Price GuideProperty Rental Cumbria Location and Price Guide
Property Rental Cumbria Location and Price GuideAskXX.com
 
Merlin-Ventana-Apartments-Baner-Pune-Brochure
Merlin-Ventana-Apartments-Baner-Pune-BrochureMerlin-Ventana-Apartments-Baner-Pune-Brochure
Merlin-Ventana-Apartments-Baner-Pune-Brochurekishor21012022
 
India first green field smart city PPT.pptx
India first green field smart city  PPT.pptxIndia first green field smart city  PPT.pptx
India first green field smart city PPT.pptxrakshitrealtors
 
M3M Altitude Provides India's biggest clubhouse Sector 65 Gurgaon
M3M  Altitude Provides India's biggest clubhouse Sector 65 GurgaonM3M  Altitude Provides India's biggest clubhouse Sector 65 Gurgaon
M3M Altitude Provides India's biggest clubhouse Sector 65 Gurgaonankitkumarwcr
 
Total Environment Tangled Up In The Green - Your Oasis in Devanahalli, North ...
Total Environment Tangled Up In The Green - Your Oasis in Devanahalli, North ...Total Environment Tangled Up In The Green - Your Oasis in Devanahalli, North ...
Total Environment Tangled Up In The Green - Your Oasis in Devanahalli, North ...JagadishKR1
 
Aishwaryam Codename Fashion At Tathawade, Pune - PDF.pdf
Aishwaryam Codename Fashion At Tathawade, Pune - PDF.pdfAishwaryam Codename Fashion At Tathawade, Pune - PDF.pdf
Aishwaryam Codename Fashion At Tathawade, Pune - PDF.pdfmonikasharma630
 
Bozeman Real Estate Market Reports April/May 2024
Bozeman Real Estate Market Reports April/May 2024Bozeman Real Estate Market Reports April/May 2024
Bozeman Real Estate Market Reports April/May 2024Referred Realty Group
 
Transforming Your Home Expert Guide to Renovations and Extensions in Upwey
Transforming Your Home Expert Guide to Renovations and Extensions in UpweyTransforming Your Home Expert Guide to Renovations and Extensions in Upwey
Transforming Your Home Expert Guide to Renovations and Extensions in UpweyEvobuiltau
 
Listing Turkey - TURKSTAT Corporate - 2024 April
Listing Turkey - TURKSTAT Corporate - 2024 AprilListing Turkey - TURKSTAT Corporate - 2024 April
Listing Turkey - TURKSTAT Corporate - 2024 AprilListing Turkey
 
Shubh Gateway Viman Nagar Pune Brochure.pdf
Shubh Gateway Viman Nagar Pune Brochure.pdfShubh Gateway Viman Nagar Pune Brochure.pdf
Shubh Gateway Viman Nagar Pune Brochure.pdfkishor21012022
 
SVN Live 5.20.24 Weekly Property Broadcast
SVN Live 5.20.24 Weekly Property BroadcastSVN Live 5.20.24 Weekly Property Broadcast
SVN Live 5.20.24 Weekly Property BroadcastSVN International Corp.
 
FGM RAMADA PENDIK CATALOG Listing Turkey
FGM RAMADA PENDIK CATALOG Listing TurkeyFGM RAMADA PENDIK CATALOG Listing Turkey
FGM RAMADA PENDIK CATALOG Listing TurkeyListing Turkey
 
Purvanchal Skyline Vista is commercial Project in Sector 94 Noida.
Purvanchal Skyline Vista is commercial Project in Sector 94 Noida.Purvanchal Skyline Vista is commercial Project in Sector 94 Noida.
Purvanchal Skyline Vista is commercial Project in Sector 94 Noida.vivekpalprc
 
Property Rental Cumbria North West Guide
Property Rental Cumbria North West GuideProperty Rental Cumbria North West Guide
Property Rental Cumbria North West GuideAskXX.com
 
What is a TA7 Form used for in relation to a property?
What is a TA7 Form used for in relation to a property?What is a TA7 Form used for in relation to a property?
What is a TA7 Form used for in relation to a property?AskXX.com
 
Introduction to Purchase Agreements (PPT)
Introduction to Purchase Agreements (PPT)Introduction to Purchase Agreements (PPT)
Introduction to Purchase Agreements (PPT)AditiAlishetty
 
Sefakoy Sinpas Boulevard Istanbul - Presentation
Sefakoy Sinpas Boulevard Istanbul - PresentationSefakoy Sinpas Boulevard Istanbul - Presentation
Sefakoy Sinpas Boulevard Istanbul - PresentationListing Turkey
 

Recently uploaded (20)

Shapoorji Pallonji Plots Jadhavgadh Fort Pune.pdf
Shapoorji Pallonji Plots Jadhavgadh Fort Pune.pdfShapoorji Pallonji Plots Jadhavgadh Fort Pune.pdf
Shapoorji Pallonji Plots Jadhavgadh Fort Pune.pdf
 
Listing Turkey - Sinpaş Queen Bomonti Katalog
Listing Turkey - Sinpaş Queen Bomonti KatalogListing Turkey - Sinpaş Queen Bomonti Katalog
Listing Turkey - Sinpaş Queen Bomonti Katalog
 
Property Rental Cumbria Location and Price Guide
Property Rental Cumbria Location and Price GuideProperty Rental Cumbria Location and Price Guide
Property Rental Cumbria Location and Price Guide
 
Merlin-Ventana-Apartments-Baner-Pune-Brochure
Merlin-Ventana-Apartments-Baner-Pune-BrochureMerlin-Ventana-Apartments-Baner-Pune-Brochure
Merlin-Ventana-Apartments-Baner-Pune-Brochure
 
India first green field smart city PPT.pptx
India first green field smart city  PPT.pptxIndia first green field smart city  PPT.pptx
India first green field smart city PPT.pptx
 
M3M Altitude Provides India's biggest clubhouse Sector 65 Gurgaon
M3M  Altitude Provides India's biggest clubhouse Sector 65 GurgaonM3M  Altitude Provides India's biggest clubhouse Sector 65 Gurgaon
M3M Altitude Provides India's biggest clubhouse Sector 65 Gurgaon
 
Total Environment Tangled Up In The Green - Your Oasis in Devanahalli, North ...
Total Environment Tangled Up In The Green - Your Oasis in Devanahalli, North ...Total Environment Tangled Up In The Green - Your Oasis in Devanahalli, North ...
Total Environment Tangled Up In The Green - Your Oasis in Devanahalli, North ...
 
Aishwaryam Codename Fashion At Tathawade, Pune - PDF.pdf
Aishwaryam Codename Fashion At Tathawade, Pune - PDF.pdfAishwaryam Codename Fashion At Tathawade, Pune - PDF.pdf
Aishwaryam Codename Fashion At Tathawade, Pune - PDF.pdf
 
Bozeman Real Estate Market Reports April/May 2024
Bozeman Real Estate Market Reports April/May 2024Bozeman Real Estate Market Reports April/May 2024
Bozeman Real Estate Market Reports April/May 2024
 
Transforming Your Home Expert Guide to Renovations and Extensions in Upwey
Transforming Your Home Expert Guide to Renovations and Extensions in UpweyTransforming Your Home Expert Guide to Renovations and Extensions in Upwey
Transforming Your Home Expert Guide to Renovations and Extensions in Upwey
 
Listing Turkey - TURKSTAT Corporate - 2024 April
Listing Turkey - TURKSTAT Corporate - 2024 AprilListing Turkey - TURKSTAT Corporate - 2024 April
Listing Turkey - TURKSTAT Corporate - 2024 April
 
Shubh Gateway Viman Nagar Pune Brochure.pdf
Shubh Gateway Viman Nagar Pune Brochure.pdfShubh Gateway Viman Nagar Pune Brochure.pdf
Shubh Gateway Viman Nagar Pune Brochure.pdf
 
SVN Live 5.20.24 Weekly Property Broadcast
SVN Live 5.20.24 Weekly Property BroadcastSVN Live 5.20.24 Weekly Property Broadcast
SVN Live 5.20.24 Weekly Property Broadcast
 
FGM RAMADA PENDIK CATALOG Listing Turkey
FGM RAMADA PENDIK CATALOG Listing TurkeyFGM RAMADA PENDIK CATALOG Listing Turkey
FGM RAMADA PENDIK CATALOG Listing Turkey
 
Purvanchal Skyline Vista is commercial Project in Sector 94 Noida.
Purvanchal Skyline Vista is commercial Project in Sector 94 Noida.Purvanchal Skyline Vista is commercial Project in Sector 94 Noida.
Purvanchal Skyline Vista is commercial Project in Sector 94 Noida.
 
Property Rental Cumbria North West Guide
Property Rental Cumbria North West GuideProperty Rental Cumbria North West Guide
Property Rental Cumbria North West Guide
 
What is a TA7 Form used for in relation to a property?
What is a TA7 Form used for in relation to a property?What is a TA7 Form used for in relation to a property?
What is a TA7 Form used for in relation to a property?
 
Ashiana Amarah Kid Centric Homes, Gurgaon
Ashiana Amarah Kid Centric Homes, GurgaonAshiana Amarah Kid Centric Homes, Gurgaon
Ashiana Amarah Kid Centric Homes, Gurgaon
 
Introduction to Purchase Agreements (PPT)
Introduction to Purchase Agreements (PPT)Introduction to Purchase Agreements (PPT)
Introduction to Purchase Agreements (PPT)
 
Sefakoy Sinpas Boulevard Istanbul - Presentation
Sefakoy Sinpas Boulevard Istanbul - PresentationSefakoy Sinpas Boulevard Istanbul - Presentation
Sefakoy Sinpas Boulevard Istanbul - Presentation
 

Union Depot Development and Activation Framework

  • 1. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY PREPARED FOR: RAMSEY COUNTY REGIONAL RAILROAD AUTHORITY PREPARED BY: HR&A ADVISORS, INC. NOVEMBER 2010
  • 3. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 3 Contents Executive Summary....................................................................................................................................................... 4 Introduction: The Union Depot Opportunity ...........................................................................................................11 A Critical Site for Downtown Saint Paul Downtown Development Context.............................................................................................................................15 Assessing Development Potential.............................................................................................................................16 Challenge: Creating External Demand Opportunity: A Distinctive Destination Case Study: San Francisco Ferry Building Marketplace Recommended Development Program....................................................................................................................22 Using Programming to Enhance Demand Options for Site Development Development Implementation ...................................................................................................................................28 Maximizing the Opportunity for Success Maximizing the Economic Benefits of Union Depot: Transit + Programming...................................................34 Recommended Plan of Action...................................................................................................................................37
  • 4. 4 HR&A ADVISORS, INC. VISIONUnion Depot will become a transit hub filled with a diverse mix of businesses and cultural programming. Investment in the reestablishment of transit uses at Union Depot and the restoration of this historic building will provide a new platform for growth in Saint Paul. Several new and existing transit lines will serve the region through the building, and its leasable areas and monumental civic spaces can serve as a vibrant new civic hall with an active front plaza – the next great public space for downtown Saint Paul. It will be a hub of activity for trains and buses, bikes, automobiles and the Saint Paul skyway system, and can also be one for downtown workers at the end of their day, for Lowertown residents looking for culture and an active urban lifestyle, and for families and visitors from throughout the city and across the region looking for a new opportunity to come downtown. In addition to a multimodal transit hub, Union Depot will be a public space surrounded by dozens of acres of developable land – strategic redevelopment sites for both the City and County, upland in Lowertown and across much of the downtown riverfront. Over the years to come, transit riders will help activate the building as riders board and alight trains or change modes of transit through the station. Nonetheless, Union Depot’s remarkable civic spaces also provide an opportunity to complement and augment transit services by creating a distinctive destination for culture, entertainment, retail, and other public services that bring a broader array of people into the building and into downtown from across the Twin Cities – a mission that will be core to the success of the project in fulfilling the four goals established for this Union Depot Activation and Development Strategy:  To ensure Union Depot becomes a vibrant and inviting place for transit riders first and foremost, as well as for downtown residents, employees, and the entire Twin Cities region;  To provide a revenue stream to support and sustain Union Depot operations;  To maximize the economic benefits of Union Depot redevelopment; and  To engender the continued growth of Lowertown as a diverse cultural destination and a unique place to live, work, and visit. Union Depot should house a distinctive marketplace and host an intensive schedule of public programs, to complement its transit services. Based on a robust market analysis that included assessment of local demographics and real estate markets, incorporated findings from the Downtown Station Area Plans and other recent downtown planning efforts, and considered best practices in other cities, HR&A recommends the development of a mix of retail, event and civic uses in the Union Depot building that could include up to 95,000 square feet of retail and programmed civic space, home to a regular schedule of arts, cultural, and entertainment programs that help drive traffic to and through the building. This development program will complement the transportation mission of Union Depot, and encourage additional civic and economic activity in the building. It is a concept has been implemented with great success for the adaptive re-use of several transit hubs across the country, including San Francisco’s Ferry Terminal, New York’s Grand Central Terminal and Washington, DC’s Union Station, among others. It is a strategy based in part on the success of these precedents, but also on the underlying market potential of Lowertown, targeted to achieve a vision that is uniquely Saint Paul. Through a phased approach to redevelopment, beginning with the reactivation of the Union Depot building as a monument to 21st Century infrastructure and the people of the Metro region, Ramsey County and the City of Saint Paul have the opportunity to realize all four goals of this Activation and Development Strategy.
  • 5. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 5 Conceptual Reuse Program Union Depot Building Program Program Area Square Feet % Permanent Tenant Areas 24,700 13% Basement Parking or Tenant Space 31,900 17% Great Hall 10,100 5% Concourse 4,900 3% Waiting Room 22,800 12% Transit Infrastructure & Services 90,900 49% Total 185,300 100% Front Plaza & Lawn 41,100 *Estimated based on design development plans; subject to change through future planning **Headhouse subbasement and other parking areas not included
  • 6. 6 HR&A ADVISORS, INC. UNION DEPOT CAN BE… A multimodal transit hub for millions of transit riders annually. Beginning with Amtrak and local and regional bus lines in 2012, the Central Corridor Light Rail in 2014, and plans for high speed rail and several other regional rail lines in the decade to come, Union Depot will be the premier multimodal transit hub in the Twin Cities region. Ridership is expected to top 4 million people each year within 25 years. The project also includes new and enhanced infrastructure for cyclists and pedestrians, along with ample space for public parking. A catalyst for economic development. Preliminary projections show that the transportation components of the Union Depot project recently approved for construction by the Ramsey County Regional Railroad Authority, can deliver nearly $565M in economic benefits throughout the region over the next 25 years. Nonetheless, these benefits can be substantially augmented through the establishment of a diverse mix of permanent users and temporary programs in the building’s civic spaces. As documented in several other cities and other transit hubs, large civic buildings activated by destination programming and retail uses have become signature urban amenities that attract residents, employers and visitors; some have resulted in double-digit percentage increases in surrounding property values. If filled with permanent uses and temporary events that complement and enhance transit services and the unique character of Lowertown – arts and cultural programs, restaurants and sustainable agricultural products, and locally-based small businesses – Union Depot can also add hundreds of jobs and result in significant property value increases, beyond the baseline benefits of transit. A new anchor for a Lowertown Market District. The Saint Paul Farmers Market – just one block from Union Depot – has become a signature asset for Lowertown, attracting upwards of 20,000 people on a Rendering of Union Depot and the Central Corridor Light Rail from Wacouta and Fourth Streets. (RCRRA).
  • 7. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 7 given weekend and more than a half million people each year. The Union Depot building has the capacity to develop a distinctive small-tenant marketplace that complements this Twin Cities destination for fresh produce with artists, restaurants, prepared foods and other locally-owned small businesses and entrepreneurs seeking to start new companies or expand business lines. Such a diverse marketplace – part of a larger tenant mix and programming strategy for Union Depot – would bring more traffic into the Depot building to support retail demand and leasing values, while also driving additional foot traffic to the farmers market and businesses throughout Lowertown. Retailers and other small businesses from throughout Saint Paul and Ramsey County, representing not only the farm-based businesses that have shown excess demand for stalls at the farmers market, but also local arts, culture, and prepared foods, can be designed to complement the Farmers Market and Lowertown business community. They can help provide a vibrant station environment and amenities for transit riders while also inducing new demand for transit services at Union Depot, encouraging ridership outside of regular commuter hours. While a Union Depot marketplace might start small, with select market days or programs, done right and managed by experienced leadership, it could grow into a permanent market destination for downtown and Ramsey County as part of a larger Lowertown Market District. A hub for arts, culture and entertainment. Union Depot can become a centerpiece for Lowertown’s high profile arts community, cultural programming, and burgeoning entertainment district. Its front lawn and interior civic spaces can be filled with arts and cultural uses and events, as well as restaurants and bars that add critical mass to the Lowertown Entertainment District. Events, organized programming, and art exhibitions can be designed and promoted to bring diverse audiences from local, regional, and global constituencies that will drive demand for leasable space. Combined with a distinctive destination events venue, Union Depot can also become a premier entertainment and cultural hub in the Twin Cities. A site for new jobs, homes, and visitors. Greater accessibility through mass transit connections and a catalytic development program in the historic Union Depot building can help turn surface parking lots and other sites throughout Lowertown and on the Union Depot property into new mixed-use transit-oriented development. Augmenting a transit hub with amenities for residents and workers can lay a foundation for private investment for decades to come – investment that will produce new jobs, provide homes for new residents, and attract new visitors from near and far. A critical link for riverfront redevelopment. Positioned below the bluffs of downtown Saint Paul and stretching nearly to the Lower Landing, the Union Depot building provides the greatest potential connection to the riverfront. It lies at the heart of the 17-mile-long Great River Park, currently the subject of a major master planning initiative. Its programming and development can become a destination arts, culture, and food stop along this new signature economic development initiative for the City, while also enhancing the value of dozens of acres of government- owned property stretching from the Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary to the Science Museum of Minnesota. Appropriately redeveloped, it can be a catalyst for the regeneration of the city’s waterfront, as other cities have experienced with comparable projects. _____ Union Depot can be all of these things for Ramsey County and the City of Saint Paul, but concerted action will be needed to make these ideas a reality. As the infrastructure is laid for Union Depot’s new transit services, a development and stewardship platform must be built to ensure Union Depot becomes a vibrant civic asset for the people of Saint Paul and the region that maximizes Ramsey County’s return on investment.
  • 8. 8 HR&A ADVISORS, INC. Rendering of the Union Depot Waiting Room with modern pavilions that could be used for market tenants. (RCRRA). Rendering of the Union Depot multimodal transit hub project at night. (RCRRA).
  • 9. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 9 ACTIONRamsey County and the City of Saint Paul should develop a public-private partnership to spearhead Union Depot programming and leasing, adopting a phased approach for success. Large-scale city-changing development initiatives like the Union Depot project have benefits that last for generations and accrue over time. Those projects that have been most successful focus on a great first phase of development; the initial years after the ribbon is cut are often critical to building momentum for the long- term success of the project. Bringing people into the building in early years can induce new transit ridership while also driving new foot traffic to Lowertown businesses. It can create a vibrant place – an amenity that people want to live near and around which employers want to locate. Ramsey County has taken the first and most pivotal step in this plan for success: it has committed to the restoration of the Union Depot building and the improvement of its site for new transit services; it has provided the physical platform for growth. Now, with less than two years before the building is reopened to the public and the first Amtrak trains rolls into the station, there are three overarching initiatives that can help ensure Union Depot becomes a vibrant and inviting place that encourages transit ridership, generates revenue to sustain its operations, and catalyzes economic and real estate development for Ramsey County and the City of Saint Paul, while leveraging private resources to the greatest extent possible to maximize the benefit of public funds. 1. Pursue public-private partnership implementation of Union Depot programming and development. While the core transit functions of the Depot should remain with the Ramsey County Regional Railroad Authority, private entrepreneurship can help the County define a realistic development business plan and realize the greatest public benefit from the project with the least public cost. Ramsey County should identify a private not-for-profit or for-profit development partner through a well-marketed solicitation process that results either in the designation of an existing organization as a master-lessee of the Depot’s programmable space or the creation of a new special-purpose not-for-profit entity. 2. Pursue efforts to improve the marketability of the Union Depot building and site. A new connection from the Waiting Room to the riverfront, a new anchor tenant for the Union Depot site, a commitment to the development of a signature linear park along the Train Deck, all could improve the chances of attracting a top-quality development partner for Union Depot. These are but three of a host of measures outlined in this report that Ramsey County should pursue to make the site more attractive to potential developer partners. 3. Establish the parameters for public programming and the use of civic space. Arts, cultural, entertainment, educational, and market programming can help make Union Depot a destination for residents, workers, and visitors throughout the Twin Cities, activating the building’s impressive civic spaces, inducing demand for transit services, and creating demand for retail and other leasable areas in the station complex. RCRRA must define the parameters for the use of spaces within the station complex to maximize development flexibility while not encumbering the station’s core function as a multimodal transit hub. _____ Ultimately, RCRRA must act swiftly and efficiently to ensure that Union Depot is an activated, inviting public place when the station opens in 2012 and as it builds momentum as the premier transit hub in the region.
  • 10. 10 HR&A ADVISORS, INC. Union Depot’s historic Waiting Room has the capacity to become a vibrant civic gathering place – a flexible space for rentals and development, with small-business public marketplace that complements and augments its function as a mass transit waiting room for the 21st Century. (HR&A)
  • 11. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 11 Introduction: The Union Depot Opportunity Union Depot presents a once-in-a-generation opportunity for Ramsey County and the City of Saint Paul. As the economy begins to emerge from the recession, multiple levels of government are making an investment that will yield substantial returns for decades to come. The Union Depot construction project recently approved by RCRRA will have three direct legacies imperative to downtown development and local, regional, and national economic growth:  Multimodal Transit Infrastructure: The reactivation of Union Depot as a multi-modal transit hub will create a new gateway to Saint Paul for the 21st Century. Amtrak, local and intercity buses, the Central Corridor Light Rail, and ultimately several other transit lines, combined with significant improvements to bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure in downtown, will provide alternative means of transportation for millions of commuter and leisure trips every year, fostering the sustainable long-term growth of the Metro region, and making it a more attractive place to live, work, and play.  A Monumental Civic Building: The Union Depot investment includes a meticulous restoration of the landmark 1920 Charles Sumner Frost building, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In addition to serving as a grand gateway to the Twin Cities, Union Depot can provide a new platform for economic, cultural and community development to enhance its mass transit benefits. The monumental Waiting Room – half the size of a football field – and the Guastavino-tiled Concourse will be reopened to the public for the first time since the 1970s. These distinctive spaces will have substantial capacity for public and private use that complement and augment multimodal transit hub functions. In the historic Headhouse, the Great Hall can continue to serve as a destination event venue for the region while also becoming a flexible public space for Lowertown and the downtown office community – a new “living room” for Saint Paul. These expansive interior public spaces, combined with a newly expanded front plaza and lawn, offer a significant opportunity to create a vibrant civic gathering place that catalyzes private investment in tens of thousands of square feet of potential tenant spaces within the building and on numerous development sites throughout downtown.  A Catalyst for Economic Growth and a Site for Long- Term Development: The Union Depot project will create jobs, augment real estate values, and enhance the economic competitiveness of downtown Saint Paul and communities connected to transit throughout the region, with estimated economic benefits of nearly $565 million over the next 25 years. Moreover, in addition to serving as a catalyst for new investment and development in downtown, the Union Depot site itself presents a significant opportunity for long-term downtown growth, covering approximately ten percent of the entire land area of downtown Saint Paul; enough land to support the project’s transportation infrastructure as well as potential development sites for future buildings. At the intersection of Lowertown and the Mississippi River, Downtown and the region, the site holds the long- term potential for new homes and new jobs for the City and County. This Activation and Development Strategy concentrates on a central element for Union Depot’s success: the redevelopment of Union Depot real estate as an unparalleled civic asset for the people of Saint Paul and the entire Twin Cities region. It addresses:  The development context that will influence Union Depot redevelopment;  The site’s development potential, including challenges for serving transit riders and opportunities for making the most of the Union Depot investment, based in best practices from comparable projects;  How Ramsey County and the City of Saint Paul can establish an organizational and financial structure to advance station development that complements and supports the Depot as the premier multi-modal transit hub in the region with vibrant civic and economic activity; and  The potential economic benefits of the Union Depot project, and a strategy for maximizing benefits to City, County, and region.
  • 12. 12 HR&A ADVISORS, INC. The public sector owns nearly the entire downtown riverfront in Saint Paul, shaded in yellow. Dozens of acres of development sites within this area are owned by Ramsey County, while the United States Post Office owns a 750,000 square foot building immediately to the west of Union Depot. The Depot building istelf lies at the center of the riverfront, granting the opportunity for a significant development project to catalyze new development all along the riverfront, and on several strategic development sites throughout downtown identified in the Downtown Station Area Plan, outlined above. (HR&A, Google Earth) The historic Union Depot building will be restored to its former glory and expanding with a new entrance pavilion along Kellogg Boulevard and a new loading dock facility. Although the 35-acre Union Depot site will include new rail tracks and platforms for both rail and bus services, a significant portion of the site will be available for future vertical development as markets rebound and and Lowertown matures with more amenities, including transit and other uses in the Depot building itself. (HR&A, Google Earth)
  • 13. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 13 A Critical Site for Downtown Saint Paul The 35 acres that Ramsey County acquired for the Union Depot project represent approximately ten percent of the entire land area of downtown Saint Paul and approximately one-third of the downtown riverfront. Its assets lie at the heart of Saint Paul’s past, present, and future economic growth: it was the confluence of the railroads and river boats at the site that gave rise to the historic warehouses of Lowertown; it is the restoration of the building and introduction of Amtrak, buses, and light rail that are powering job creation and creating a platform for growth in this challenging economy; and it will be the confluence of transit lines planned for the future that will continue to augment Saint Paul’s ability to attract new jobs, residents, and visitors. Investments made today in the Union Depot building and on its site will lay the groundwork for decades of economic development. The planned program of the transportation project can be considered as three interrelated elements: transit infrastructure and services, restored station spaces, and site work. Transit Infrastructure and Services: Ultimately, Union Depot is planned to provide 4 rail platforms leading to 8 passenger rail tracks, a major facility for intercity and local buses, a welcome mat for the terminus of the Central Corridor Light Rail, a bicycle facility, more than 650 parking spaces, and enhanced infrastructure for pedestrians and cyclists across the site. Each of these uses will have a presence in the Union Depot building and on its surrounding land. While all of these program elements are expected to materialize in the next 25 years, they will be implemented incrementally, with Amtrak, bus, and cyclist facilities opening in 2012, the Central Corridor Light Rail debuting in 2014, and additional regional rail lines following soon thereafter. Restored Station Spaces: The Union Depot construction project will include a detailed restoration of the historic building and its front plaza. Major building areas include:  Approximately 25,000 square feet of permanent tenant space in existing building spaces;  Nearly 40,000 square feet of interior civic spaces, including an expansive 300-foot by 80-foot column- free Waiting Room, a nearly 5,000 square foot Concourse with historic Guastavino ceilings, and a 10,000 square foot Great Hall;  A one-acre front plaza, closed to automobile traffic and reconfigured to welcome pedestrians.  Nearly 32,000 square feet of basement space with the potential for conversion to leasable area.  Approximately 90,000 square feet of in-building transportation infrastructure uses and services. Site Work: Around the Union Depot building, the site stretches from Sibley Street to the Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary, between Kellogg Boulevard and the privately-owned freight rail lines that border the southern edge of the site. This land covers more than 30 acres and will include a rehabilitated train deck with a distinctive edge that leads to the nature sanctuary, and at-grade parking for more hundreds of cars. Some of this land can be made available to new vertical construction in the years to come, as most recently envisioned in the Downtown Station Area Plan.
  • 14. 14 HR&A ADVISORS, INC. Downtown Development Market Highlights 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 1/2 Mile from Union Depot City of Saint Paul Downtown Saint Paul City of Minneapolis Downtown Minneapolis East Metro 7-County Metro Area 13-County Metro Area Twin Cities Population Growth Rate, 2000-2009 Leading Lowertown Office Industries  Software & Technology  Professional Services  PR & Advertising  Art & Design  Non profits  Smaller government service companies Food & Beverage Retail Momentum  Barrio Tequila Bar  Bin Wine Bar  The Bulldog  Faces Mears Park  Heartland Restaurant & Farm Direct Market  Vines and Steins New Residential Development, 2000-2009
  • 15. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 15 Downtown Development Context Downtown Saint Paul has seen the beginnings of an urban renaissance over the last decade. Although downtown still struggles to attract office tenants and rents for both office space and retail have recently fallen, residential uses downtown have shown signs of promise – a critical first step for downtown revitalization. From 2000-2009, Lowertown was one of the fastest growing areas in the entire region, with a rise in population of nearly 23%. Estimates show that more than 4,500 people now live within ½-mile of Union Depot, and that they are becoming increasingly diverse, with Asians and Latinos the two fastest growing segments of the population. Two thirds of the neighborhood is non-family households, with an average household size of 1.5 individuals per home. Per capita income has grown by 35% to nearly $43,000. Home prices downtown doubled, with the creation of 2,265 housing units, and over the last few years, this development has helped spawn several new restaurants and bars, particularly in Lowertown. Over the next decade, American cities will compete to attract the two fastest growing segments of the population: people in the 25-39 and 55-74 age cohorts. Numerous studies have shown these age cohorts increasingly choose to live in dense, urban locations where amenities and culture are within walking distance, and where their carbon footprint can be minimized. According to one recent study, 77% of Generation Y homebuyers and renters plan to live in a central urban location. Office employers in growing service sectors will increasingly choose urban locations to cater to the best and brightest within this group. The core neighborhood assets that have driven Lowertown’s growth over the last decade consistently rank among the top factors for young singles and couples’ location decisions, which in turn influence employers’ decisions. These same assets will continue to form the foundation for the next chapter of Lowertown development:  The Saint Paul Farmers’ Market provides the local, organic foods and the kind of vibrant urban place that is in high demand among those seeking urban lifestyles.  Vibrant Public Spaces, including Mears Park, which has become a world-class urban amenity, complete with a running stream, diverse plantings, and a bandshell that hosts frequent cultural programs, as well as the Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary, perhaps the only nature sanctuary in a downtown anywhere in America, which provides a pastoral park for the 21st Century within walking distance.  A Robust Artist Community, many of whom live and work in buildings around Union Depot, have created a cultural destination in Lowertown, with galleries, public sculpture, and active programming.  Historic architecture and loft-style apartments provide a housing form that caters to this generation’s desire for change from the suburbs. The Union Depot multimodal transit hub project will provide an important next step for this neighborhood’s development, connecting it to the region with mass transit, reducing residents’ and workers’ car dependence, and making the area a more environmentally-friendly place to live and work. It can support the development of a critical mass of venues for the burgeoning Lowertown Entertainment District and can enhance downtown’s ability to attract major office tenants. Moreover, it can also provide a significant link to Saint Paul’s riverfront, which is currently the subject of a major master planning initiative – the Great River Park project. A market analysis produced for the 2009 Downtown Station Area Plan and updated for this project identifies potential demand for approximately 5,000- 7,000 new homes in downtown over the next three decades, along with more than 1.8 million square feet of office space, 100,000-150,000 square feet of retail, and up to approximately 300 hotel rooms. Nonetheless, Lowertown will still need to develop more amenities to attract more people to live, work, and play in the neighborhood – this lack of amenities is consistently cited as one of the most pressing neighborhood needs, and the pace at which they are developed will be directly correlated to the pace of new development in downtown. The development of new amenities for residents and office workers, including both service businesses and public programming, can be a central element of Union Depot to help advance this downtown development context.
  • 16. 16 HR&A ADVISORS, INC. Transit Service Implementation Timeline Assessing Development Potential The Union Depot investment will yield three types of real estate development opportunities:  In-Station: Development of transit-serving retail and other revenue-producing uses and public programs in the Union Depot building;  On-site: Development on the additional 30 acres of land that Ramsey County owns around the historic building; and  Surrounding parcels: Development and redevelopment of public and private lands in the surrounding neighborhood, including dozens of acres of County-owned land along the riverfront to the west of Union Depot. Each of these development areas must be considered as a function of local real estate development markets – they each have long-term development potential, in line with trends in the growth of Lowertown and downtown Saint Paul, but have varying degrees of development potential in the near term while credit markets are still tight and demand for new product remains low. However, development in the Union Depot terminal building itself creates an additional consideration: Union Depot will open in late 2012, marking the beginning of its new life as a restored multimodal transit hub. From this point on, the project’s success will be measured not only by the amount of transit service it provides, but also the quality of the multimodal hub experience, the amenities it provides transit riders, and its ability to foster economic activity and growth in downtown Saint Paul and the region. Phase I: 2012 Amtrak Greyhound Jefferson Lines Metro Transit Phase II: 2014 Central Corridor Light Rail Phase III: 2015-2030 High Speed Rail Duluth Intercity Rail Eau Claire Intercity Rail Red Rock Commuter Rail Rush Line Corridor Rochester Intercity Rail Mankato Intercity Rail Gateway Corridor Riverview Corridor Robert Street Corridor
  • 17. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 17 Challenge: Creating External Demand The challenge for developing transit-serving retail and creating a vibrant station for transit riders will be to create a destination that brings people to the building for retail and entertainment programming that complement mass transit services. An analysis of multimodal transit hubs around the country reveals that while transit riders create a certain amount demand for in-station retail, this demand will fall well short of Union Depot’s capacity. Stations that rely on demand primarily from transit riders can support approximately one square foot of retail for every 1,100 annual riders. In other words, a station that serves 1 million riders each year can support approximately 900 square feet of retail – perhaps one general store that sells coffee, newspapers, soft drinks, and other goods to serve mass transit riders. Although this correlation can serve as a general rule of thumb, there are exceptions, depending on the particular locational and use characteristics of a given station. For example, Union Station in Dallas, Texas, which serves passengers from Amtrak, local and intercity buses, and multiple commuter rail lines, does not have any retail to serve its 4 million annual riders. Station developers have attempted to provide retail services for these riders – from coffee stands to a general store to a shoe shine – without success; station developers says commuters are well served by these amenities in and around suburban stations where they board transit in the morning, and retailers have not perceived an opportunity to capture demand from these commuters on their way home for such retail as groceries or restaurants. On the other hand, some multimodal hubs support retail well in excess of this typical ratio of 1,100 riders per square foot: stations such as New York’s Grand Central Terminal, Union Station in Washington, DC, and the Ferry Building on the San Francisco waterfront have each created dynamic retail destinations with active programming to attract demand from residents and workers in their surrounding communities. Union Depot ridership is projected to be approximately 4 million by 2035, likely supporting approximately 4,000 square feet of transit-serving retail, or approximately one-quarter of the existing tenant areas on the building’s main floor and less than 15% of the total existing tenant areas in the building. Moreover, this demand will materialize incrementally * Dallas Union Station has 4 million annual riders but no retail space. * 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 Annual Multimodal Hub Riders per Square Foot of Retail Mean
  • 18. 18 HR&A ADVISORS, INC. over the next twenty five years only as new transit services at the Depot come online. Absent the attraction of significant external demand, it will be challenging for RCRRA to provide basic retail services for Union Depot transit riders. When the station opens in 2012, its ridership will be approximately 175,000, much of which will be on Amtrak trains that depart early in the morning and arrive late at night. By 2014, when the Central Corridor Light Rail opens, ridership is expected to grow to approximately 925,000, yielding potential transit-serving retail demand of approximately 900 square feet. However, these riders will board and alight in front of the building on Fourth Street and may not have reason to enter the historic building itself. Moreover, Union Depot’s expansive indoor civic spaces will also create a challenge and opportunity for RCRRA and the City: they are too big for transit riders alone. Unless other people are given a reason to come to the building, these spaces are at risk of becoming desolate, with little contribution to – and potentially negative impressions for – the transit rider experience and economic development for the city or region. Multimodal transit hubs across the country have an average of 300-850 annual riders per square foot of civic space. Union Depot will have three times this amount of space, considering the projected ridership for 2035. Before additional transit services are introduced, this ratio of transit riders to civic space will be substantially lower – less than 5 annual riders per square foot in 2012, and approximately 25 riders per square foot even after the Central Corridor Light Rail rolls into the station. Union Depot’s success as a civic space and vibrant transit hub depends on bringing non-transit riders into the building. If Union Depot is to achieve its goal of creating a vibrant place that not only serves the needs of its transit riders, but also encourages growth in ridership, RCRRA must aggressively pursue a strategy that creates demand for people to come to the building for reasons other than transit, and to spend money while they are there. Building these constituencies that encompass broader segments of the population can help induce additional demand for transit, creating a vibrant station environment and a leisure destination at the confluence of the region’s transit services. 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 Annual Multimodal Hub Riders per Square Foot of Civic Space Median
  • 19. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 19 Opportunity: A Distinctive Destination Despite these challenges, Union Depot will be one of the most impressive civic spaces in the Twin Cities. Its expansive civic spaces and renewed front plaza create a tremendous opportunity for RCRRA to consider a combination of temporary, interim, and permanent programming for the Depot that:  Activates the building to create a more welcoming environment for transit customers and enhance the array of retail and other services available to them;  Generates revenue both by filling leasable area within the Depot and by attracting more transit customers with vibrant, activated civic spaces and a pleasant commuter experience;  Provides amenities to the growing downtown residential community and supports the development of a critical mass of restaurants and entertainment venues in Lowertown;  Strengthens the relationship between transportation, downtown riverfront recreation and Lowertown residents, artists, and entertainment opportunities;  Respects and enhances the historic architecture of the Depot; and  Creates value for surrounding development parcels, including RCRRA-owned land. Other multimodal hubs around the country have leveraged comparable civic space resources for real estate and economic development purposes. Where transit riders no longer fill the monumental spaces of the stations from the Union Depot era, station developers have repurposed these spaces to their advantage. From the expansive spaces of Grand Central Terminal and the Washington, DC, Union Station, to the smaller-scale spaces of Union Station in Dallas or the San Francisco Ferry Building (see case study on following page), these distinctive spaces have been the centerpiece of major redevelopment efforts. The first critical question for the success of Union Depot is: what combination of temporary, interim, and permanent programming will maximize external demand to meet the project’s objectives? Grand Central Terminal’s Vanderbilt Hall hosts a wide variety of public and private events that serve as a destination within the station for surrounding workers as well as residents throughout the city and region. Here, it hosts a squash tournament. (Suzy Allman) In San Francisco’s Ferry Building Marketplace, the buildiing was reconfigured around a long central nave that serves as both a public gathering place and a main street for the building’s small-shop retailers and food service providers. (Aaron Kohr)
  • 20. 20 HR&A ADVISORS, INC. Case Study: the San Francisco Ferry Building Marketplace San Francisco’s Ferry Terminal – a multimodal transit hub on the city’s waterfront served by ferries, buses, light rail, and Amtrak – has succeeded by creating a unique retail marketplace in the city, attracting workers and residents from the downtown core, gourmet and local food shoppers from throughout the city, and tourists from across the country and around the globe. Mission: To develop a retail destination to enhance a multimodal transit hub, amenitize office space, and bring people to the waterfront. Programming: The Ferry Building Marketplace has succeeded by drawing on demand from San Francisco’s major farmers market and creating a permanent home for retailers and restaurateurs inspired by the market’s focus on food from the Bay Area. A diversity of local uses helps establish a distinctive destination that can attract people from local, regional, and global constituencies, while four large restaurants, a private events space, and office tenants create a diversified stream of revenue that can maintain stability. Design: The developers of the marketplace made significant changes to the building’s interiors and waterfront façade, carving a new public “nave” that serves as the building’s central organizational axis, with a double-loaded retail corridor of small, open storefronts and frequent entrances and exits. Management: The Ferry Building was developed by Wilson Meany Sullivan, a San-Francisco-based developer, and Equity Office Properties, owner of one of the largest portfolios in the country. Equity Office manages the property through a lease with the San Francisco Port Authority, while the outdoor farmer’s market, which activates the building’s exterior and brings people inside, is operated by a separate not- for-profit organization. (onlyinsanfrancisco.com)
  • 21. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 21 Funding: The $110 million private development project leveraged approximately $30-40 million in public infrastructure funds surrounding the building, and was financed by the projected value of the office space in the building and the strength of the Equity Office balance sheet. Retail development was initially perceived as speculative given low levels of foot traffic along the waterfront and the psychological divide lingering from the elevated Embarcadero Freeway. Timing: The San Francisco Port Authority first attempted to redevelop the Ferry Building in the mid- 1970s. After its initial failed attempt, the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake that precipitated the demolition of the freeway helped make a new redevelopment effort possible. A request for development proposals ten years later led to the selection of a developer that would take nearly six years to complete the project. Three years later, more than thirty years after the initial development attempt, and a decade after the second, the Ferry Building marketplace became the fifth most visited tourist destination in the city. Economic Benefits: The Ferry Building’s distinctive retail environment has created a more attractive atmosphere for the building’s mass transit customers and – more significantly for local economies and public benefit – helped activate the waterfront for pedestrians and cyclists, making this new frontier of the city’s development a premier destination not only for tourists, but also for high-value office jobs. The pier adjacent to Ferry Building is now home to the San Francisco headquarters of Bloomberg LP and commands the highest office rents in the city. Its developers note that that building’s success – and even its development – would not have been possible without the innovative redevelopment of the Ferry Building. The building underwent major renovations, as its historic spaces were augmented for a modern program. (Equity Office) The marketplace creates a vibrant civic space in the Ferry Terminal, with a double-loaded corridor of small-space tenants. (Aaron Kohr) The plaza in front of the building is activated on a regular basis with public markets and cultural programming. (Ed Anderson)
  • 22. 22 HR&A ADVISORS, INC. Recommended Union Depot Development Concept
  • 23. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 23 Recommended Development Program Driven by the four goals for Union Depot development identified at the beginning of this study, the unique development opportunities and challenges inherent to the Union Depot site and Lowertown, and best practices from comparable projects across the country, HR&A recommends RCRRA adopt a reuse strategy for Union Depot that includes a diverse mix of civic, cultural, entertainment, and retail uses in the building first and foremost, to serve as a catalyst for surrounding development and increased transit ridership. The program – a comprehensive “marketplace” concept, built on the top quality products and programs distinctive of Saint Paul and the Twin Cities, within a top quality work of Saint Paul architecture – should include:  A mix of locally-based tenants in approximately 25,000 square feet of permanent tenant spaces, with the option for expansion into the Headhouse basement, and potential use of space within the subbasement for support – tenants that can complement the Farmers Market and Lowertown businesses, creating more opportunities to bring people downtown; Examples of such complementary tenants could include vendors of local products that are restricted from the existing Market, but that showcase the best of the region,  An event space in the Great Hall, comparable to, but more robust than, the current use by Christos’ Restaurant, with opportunities for events to occupy the front plaza, Concourse, and potentially other Union Depot spaces;  Expansion of leasable areas into the building’s civic spaces, including for restaurant tables and other uses in the Great Hall, as well as for the development of a small-tenant public marketplace in flexible, high- quality and historically-sensitive market pavilions in the Waiting Room – uses that can activate the space and provide revenue without compromising its public nature or transit functions; and  Significant public programming throughout the building’s civic spaces and front plaza, including regularly scheduled events that bring local residents and workers into the building on a weekly basis, and larger exhibitions and festivals that attract a broader array of visitors from throughout the Twin Cities and the region. Ultimately, this program can yield up to approximately 95,000 square feet of potential rentable areas within the Union Depot building, as well as the programming and retail activation of the front plaza, to support and be supported by transit uses. It aims to generate the demand necessary for Union Depot development success the same way other civic spaces have been activated and retail projects developed in comparable situations: by drawing on local, regional, and global constituencies. Recommended Areas for Program Development Program Area Square Feet Great Hall Tenants 12,500 Concourse 2,200 Waiting Room 900 Concourse 2nd Floor 5,900 Headhouse Basement 3,200 Headhouse Basement Parking or Other Tenant 31,900 Potential Permanent Tenant Areas 56,600 Great Hall 10,100 Concourse 4,900 Waiting Room 22,800 Total Civic Space for Programming & Rentals 37,800 Total Building Area for Program Development 94,400 Front Plaza & Lawn 41,100 *Estimated based on design development plans; subject to change through future planning **Headhouse subbasement and other parking areas not included
  • 24. 24 HR&A ADVISORS, INC. Tapping into Lowertown’s Programming Success Saint Paul Farmers Market (HR&A) The Saint Paul Farmers Market: This public programming initiative for a site owned by the City of Saint Paul can bring more than 25,000 people to Lowertown on a given Saturday, averaging 20,000 visitors each weekend from April through November. Not only has this market been pivotal to the resurgence of Lowertown, most recently creating the impetus for a significant private investment in the 18,000 square-foot Heartland Restaurant and Farm Direct Market, but it has also supported more than 150 farm-based businesses from the Twin Cities region. The Saint Paul Art Crawl: This festival showcasing the best of the region’s artists brings 40,000 people to Lowertown during two weekends each year and helps reinforce Lowertown’s status as ground zero for contemporary culture in Saint Paul. Twin Cities Jazz Festival: Now in its 12th year in Mears Park, this lively music event draws more than 75,000 people to Lowertown each year. Music in Mears: Over the last six years, this regularly scheduled concert and movie series in Mears Park has expanded from 4 shows during the summer to 12. Concrete and Grass: Initiated just three years ago by the Ordway’s Arts Partnership and Mayor Chris Coleman’s office, this new music festival features on two stages in Mears Park. Twin Cities Jazz Festival in Mears Park (razoo.com) Using Programming to Enhance Demand Where cities have too few residents or workers to support new retail development or to activate new public spaces, distinctive destination programming – both in terms of retail merchandising and, more significantly, cultural and entertainment events – have become the primary driver of demand. From temporary events and festivals like the Twin Cities Jazz Festival in Mears Park or the Winter Carnival, to regularly scheduled happenings like the Saint Paul Farmers Market or Music in Mears, to privately- produced programs like concerts at Barrio or art shows at Black Dog, these programming initiatives have been produced by investors both public and private to bring people to emerging neighborhoods, and to cultivate a stable base of customers. Their key to success has been drawing on demand from layered geographies:  Local: Any programming initiative must serve local constituents first and foremost – in this case, the nearly 80,000 residents and workers of Lowertown, downtown, and the Capitol District. Investors recognize that although these users may be smaller in number, and sometimes in purchasing power, they are the most frequent and reliable customer base. Their presence creates an aura of authenticity – that a particular program is of the community or neighborhood in which it is produced. Once developed and stabilized, this local base of constituents for a given program or place helps ensure its long-term vibrancy and sustainability.  Regional: Building on a local base, investors try to attract a more regional audience – in this case, residents throughout the City of Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minneapolis, and potential day-trippers from across the region. Although it is more difficult to attract people in this group, and they come to programs less frequently, their numbers are much larger, they will be connected to Union Depot by every major form of transportation, and they generally spend substantially more (a study in Saint Paul found that cultural program attendees from throughout the region spend more than twice the amount per program than local users, including nearly twice the amount on meals and three times the amount on program-related goods).
  • 25. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 25  Global: When programming is truly exceptional, its demand profile is expanded to visitors from across the country and throughout the world, as local and regional users bring their extended families, friends, and business partners to see their favorite hometown events and places. These out-of-towners are often prepared to spend even more per trip than regional constituents and bring the added benefit of civic or project brand development as they tell their friends at home about their trip. Successful public places and programs – from destination parks to large- scale festivals – can attract up to one quarter or more of all visitors from these “global” constituents. Saint Paul has begun to have great success in leveraging its public spaces and City-owned land for public programming over the last decade. Approximately 6.5 million people came to downtown Saint Paul in 2008 for cultural programs and major events. People come to Lowertown in particular not only to visit, but also to live and work because of the neighborhood’s focus on fresh food, fresh art, and fresh culture within a distinctive setting of historic architecture and the lush Mears Park. These programs include attractions for people from the neighborhood and the Twin Cities as a whole, with occasional events like this year’s Saint Paul Poetry Slam that bring people from across the country. Moreover, Lowertown’s small business owners and neighborhood artists are also producing programs in their own spaces as private entrepreneurs. For example, Barrio, Black Dog, Bulldog, and other local retailers sponsor concerts and exhibitions to bring in customers, while artists host Lowertown First Fridays in five of the neighborhood’s studio buildings and three different art galleries on the first Friday of every month. Union Depot will succeed in creating and capturing external demand the same way these other Lowertown places have: by producing dynamic public programs that cater to local, regional, and global constituencies and providing an outlet for the spending potential generated by these programs. Ultimately, RCRRA should pursue a development program for the Union Depot building focused on the best of Lowertown: intensive cultural programming and a high quality small business marketplace. The recommended flexible development program – structured as a highly interactive mix of uses that optimizes the building’s architecture and is intended to engender a vibrant station environment during morning, afternoon and evening – will serve as a first phase of Union Depot development. It is an ambitious vision to enhance transit services and catalyze mixed-use transit-oriented development on soft sites throughout Lowertown, as well as RCRRA’s dozens of acres of riverfront property both to the east and west of the Depot building. But it is also a vision that is pragmatic: it optimizes the use of the building’s impressive architecture and civic spaces, creating opportunities both for activation and increased revenue; it maximizes the opportunity for RCRRA to leverage the private entrepreneurship that has helped countless comparable projects succeed across the country, enhancing opportunities for capturing demand from layered geographies; and it allows RCRRA to focus on its core mission of providing the best transportation services that Union Depot can offer, without diluting the civic purpose of the project. Union Depot’s Front Plaza can be activated with programs that bring people downtown and into the building. (RCRRA)
  • 26. 26 HR&A ADVISORS, INC. This distinctive colonnade can become the heart of a signature urban park stretching from Lowertown and Union Depot to the Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary. (HR&A) The Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary, a spectacular new park at the eastern edge of the Union Depot site. (HR&A)
  • 27. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 27 Options for Site Development While the reuse of the Union Depot building should be aggressively pursued for its catalytic potential, RCRRA should maintain a flexible approach to future vertical construction on the site, with two particular enhancements to current design-build plans to organize and catalyze future development. Based on best practices both in Saint Paul and around the country, as well as the unique attributes of RCRRA’s 30-acre site surrounding the Union Depot building, HR&A recommends RCRRA begin to two mutually supportive options for developing the site in the near future to create additional value for its property and for Lowertown and downtown as a whole:  A new signature linear park. Current Union Depot designs include an elevated bike path along the northern side of the train deck. This concept should be expanded. The edge of the train deck east of Broadway, with its distinctive industrial colonnade and wide truck ramps, presents an ideal opportunity for a new destination linear park both on top of and below the elevated deck. Cities across the country have been seeking opportunities for the creation of such linear and elevated parks since the world- renowned High Line Park opened in New York City last summer, and, like the High Line, this portion of the Union Depot site provides a distinctive industrial remnant that is already endowed with a lush planted area that has grown over the years. Such a development would not merely be a park for civic benefit, however; it would also serve as a value creator for Union Depot’s developable area, as well as for Lowertown. The practice of utilizing parkland as a value generator for master-planned developments is nearly two centuries old, and the phenomenon has grown ever more important as downtown real estate developments seek to compete with their suburban counterparts. Indeed, both major master-planned developments in downtown Saint Paul over the last decade – Wacouta Commons and Upper Landing, which accounted for half of all new downtown housing construction during this period – leveraged public investments in parkland during their initial phases, and success in attracting major corporate tenants has also focused on downtown’s spectacular urban parks. RCRRA should actively pursue strategies to make this portion of the site a destination in its own right, as well as a critical connection to the Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary and a new element in the Great River Park project, while also adopting a design that is sensitive to the historic value of the train deck, which is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.  A new development site for an anchor. The area adjacent to the new Kellogg Boulevard entrance pavilion, between its eastern edge and the bus ramp at Broadway, should be considered for new vertical development. This site, which might include the use of air rights over a portion of the bus waiting platform, is larger than the footprint of the Headhouse and could be of significant future development value to RCRRA. It could be endowed with a direct indoor connection to Union Depot (and the entire skyway system of downtown Saint Paul) through the new entrance pavilion, and would also be a site that could house floorplates larger than any other building in the immediate area. Although many potential users will likely be eager to develop this site in the long-term, RCRRA should target an anchor institutional or commercial that can serve as catalysts in their own right, providing a stable base of users of the Union Depot building and infusing new activity along Kellogg Boulevard. One potential user group that was suggested by the local redevelopment corporation in the past – an expansive higher education facility – could be a particular boon to the site and should be pursued aggressively, although other large-scale tenants would also be of substantial value in activating the site and serving as a value-creator for downtown Saint Paul and the remainder of RCRRA’s property. In the interim, before an anchor tenant can be attracted to this site, RCRRA can leverage this expansive portion of the deck for temporary programming. It is an ideal site for temporary outdoor public markets that can help bring new activity into the building, and it might also be used for larger civic festivals and site rentals, as the train deck was when Cirque du Soleil came to Saint Paul.
  • 28. 28 HR&A ADVISORS, INC. Development Implementation RCRRA is implementing the Union Depot multimodal transit hub project and is best positioned to manage and maintain the project’s transit infrastructure, in part through agreements with transit service providers. In analyzing potential implementation structures for the development and stewardship of the recommended Union Depot development program, HR&A evaluated the extent to which different mechanisms and entities met the following criteria imperative to the success of a project like Union Depot in the short-, medium-, and long-term:  Create a great first phase of development. The development schedule of the Union Depot transportation project establishes parameters for the timing of development implementation: the station will open in late 2012, garnering widespread publicity and marking the official beginning of Union Depot’s new life; two years later, the Central Corridor Light Rail is scheduled to bring nearly one million people to Union Depot’s doorsteps every year; and in the decades to come, several other transit connections are slated to serve the Depot. This timeframe, set by the transportation projects that are at the heart of Union Depot’s revitalization, creates implications for development phasing, particularly in light of the current economic environment. As evidenced by other comparable projects, the extent to which these initial years of redevelopment are successful will be directly related to the long-term success of the project in meeting stated goals. Different implementation structures bring different capacities to achieve a great phase I by the time the station is operational.  Maximize revenues and minimize costs to RCRRA. The Union Depot building is expected to cost up to $1.5-2.3 million annually to maintain, based on preliminary projections provided by RCRRA. The capacity to offset these costs with revenues derived from uses in the Depot building will be a result of the implementation entity’s ability to optimize the development program, attracting quality tenants and effectively managing the building’s programs as a critical business venture for the success of the Union Depot project – both in terms of serving transit riders, and complementing and catalyzing new development
  • 29. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 29 RCRRA Master Lessee Public-Private Partnership RCRRA Tenants Baseline Scenario in downtown. Nonetheless, maximizing revenues, especially in early years of operation, may also be tied to the organization’s capacity to win grants and philanthropy from both government and institutional players, as is typical of public markets and highly activated urban civic spaces.  Preserve long-term development flexibility. As new transportation connections are planned at the Depot, RCRRA will require flexibility of the site’s design and management responsibilities in order to accommodate potentially unforeseen needs of these new users. As local and national economies improve, the economics of site development will change. As downtown and Lowertown continue to develop, local constituencies, politics, and economic development policies may proscribe alternative uses for the undeveloped portions of the site. Decisions made in the near future about stewardship structure will have significant impacts on RCRRA’s ability to maintain its desired level of programmatic flexibility and fiscal control in the decades to come. Guided by these three criteria, the overarching goals for the Union Depot project, and best practices from other comparable projects, HR&A recommends RCRRA pursue a public-private partnership structure to guide implementation of the Union Depot development program in the building. Private entrepreneurship, guided by specific public aspirations, will provide the most efficient means for maximizing Union Depot’s benefits and the greatest opportunity for eliminating RCRRA’s building management costs over time, while also allowing RCRRA to maintain long-term flexibility for the site. RCRRA should structure a master-lease agreement for real estate development components in the Union Depot building. Master-leasing approximately 95,000 square feet or more of the Union Depot building will minimize RCRRA’s cost obligation for the operations and maintenance of the building, while also providing its private partner with the flexibility necessary to make development within the building work. By master-leasing this space to a third party, RCRRA can reduce its operations and maintenance costs by more than 40%, or approximately $540,000 each year, based on third-party management costs. Conceptual Responsibility for Union Depot Operations & Maintenance Costs Although entering into a master-lease agreement provides the greatest opportunity to meet Union Depot project goals, RCRRA will have to establish parameters for potential uses, new construction, and maintenance responsibilities within this 95,000 square foot master- lease, as well as parameters for activating and deriving revenues from the site outside this master- leased area. For example, a development agreement will have to include provisions to ensure the Waiting Room is optimized for its transit functions, while also being used as an activity and revenue generator, and that allow RCRRA’s private sector partner to make the best use of the Union Depot site for programming and space rentals. $760,000 $730,000 $210,000 $1,270,000
  • 30. 30 HR&A ADVISORS, INC. Conceptual Real Estate Development Economics (stabilized year) $500,000 Conceptual Net Annual Revenue from Leasable Area $180,000+ Annual Net Revenue from Parking (does not include parking under the train deck) $250,000 Conceptual Master-Lessee Building Management Costs (Net of subleasable areas; front plaza maintenance not included) $1.5 - $4.0+ million Order-of-Magnitude Capital Required HR&A’s conceptual analysis demonstrates that through a public-private partnership for real estate development within the building, RCRRA’s partner and master-lessee could achieve nearly $500,000 in revenue from triple-net-leased space upon development stabilization, if the lessee is able to use portions of the Waiting Room and Great Hall as rentable area – for restaurant seating, retail kiosks, and market pavilions, as well as temporary events. Significantly more revenue could be achieved should the developer create sufficient demand for space in the Headhouse basement to produce more revenue than parking uses. Revenues from parking across the entire site, currently approximately $180,000 annually, net of operating fees, with significant room for growth both in terms of rates and pending demand, can also be used to create a financial structure attractive to private investors, while still preserving RCRRA’s flexibility for new construction in the future , should the need or market arise. Although these revenues may take several years to stabilize, they should be sufficient to cover the master-lessee’s annual operating costs – including the cost of providing public programming – within its first 5-10 years of operations. Significantly, capital costs for implementing new real estate uses in the building will be limited, thanks to the substantial investment being made to restore the Union Depot building. This project will yield a building with significant leasable area delivered as “white box” space, complete with basic utility infrastructure for tenants. While this space will be prepared to begin leasing to potential Union Depot tenants, certain additional improvements may be required to expand leasable areas and maximize the leasability of the Union Depot building. On an order-of-magnitude basis, these costs could be less than $1.5 million or up to $4 million or more, including typical tenant improvement allowances, depending on the final building program selected and spaces to be used, based on preliminary projections provided by the Union Depot design-building team.
  • 31. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 31 There are two ways that RCRRA can ensure the success of the Union Depot development project through a public-private partnership structure:  Option 1: Issue a competitive solicitation and encourage a range of not-for-profit and for-profit developers to respond. Although competitive solicitation process would require substantial marketing of the project to potential developers and stewards both locally and nationally, it would encourage entrepreneurship in assessing the specific revenue generating and programming opportunities necessary to achieve RCRRA’s vision for Union Depot. This structure could also result in a swift and efficient implementation process, if qualified development partners are enticed to respond, leading to a great first phase of development. It would also maximize the amount of private investment generated from the Union Depot project in the next few years. The challenge with such a structure, however, is that there may be a lack of qualified respondents as a result of the current development climate and the distinctive mix of uses the Depot will house, which require a sophisticated development organization. Moreover, developers – particularly profit-oriented organizations – may request an amount of control over the building that is less favorable to RCRRA, potentially including a long-term lease and development rights outside the Union Depot building. Significant outreach to potential local and national development partners could mitigate this risk.  Option 2: Create a new private not-for-profit development organization in partnership with the City of Saint Paul, local business leaders, and institutional and foundation sponsors. Creating a new not-for-profit entity to implement the Union Depot development program can maximize RCRRA’s ability to maintain control over the development and programming of the building, both through representation on its board of directors, and through a potentially shorter master-lease term, with more flexible provisions to allow RCRRA to change certain parameters of the rights of the master lease. Such a structure would also have the additional advantage of a direct relationship with the County and City that would create certain leverage for the pursuit of sponsorships and foundation and philanthropic grants for public market development and programming in the building, as well as grants from State and Federal government resources. However, it is generally quite challenging for a government organization to create and foster the entrepreneurship that Union Depot needs, as implementation quality relies on a sophisticated development organization. If RCRRA and the City chose to pursue the creation of s special-purpose not- for-profit for real estate development and programming in the Union Depot building, it would require a powerful board of directors, filled with high-profile business and civic leaders, and the recruitment of highly talented executive leadership. This task of creating a new organization would also require additional start-up funds for the hiring of new staff. Moreover, even if such an organization could be efficiently structured and the right team put in place, it is likely that RCRRA would risk becoming the funder of first resort if a subsidy were required or if revenues fall short of initial projections. Either structure can work financially. HR&A’s analysis indicates that over approximately 10-15 years, the recommended Union Depot development concept should generate sufficient revenues to cover implementation costs, as well as operations and maintenance of a significant portion of the Depot on a triple-net-lease basis, and the provision of substantial public programming. The extent to which this program will be successful, however, will be directly correlated to both the quality of the entity chosen to steward Union Depot development, and the capacity of that organization to leverage grants and other public funding sources and programs during the implementation process. In either scenario, however, this public-private partnership should be limited to the Depot building; it will be prudent for RCRRA to maintain control over the surrounding site as infrastructure needs may shift over time. Moreover, preservation of the site for future development will allow momentum in the Union Depot building and on surrounding sites in Lowertown to create additional value for RCRRA’s in the years to come, as markets rebound and mature.
  • 32. 32 HR&A ADVISORS, INC. A direct connection between the Union Depot Waiting Room and Saint Paul’s riverfront parks system can enhance both of these economic development assets for the City and County, allowing people to move more easily from train station to riverfront and bringing additional foot traffic and spending power into the Depot and Lowertown as a whole. (HR&A) Maximizing the Opportunity for Success Regardless of which implementation approach proves most viable – a lease to an existing development organization, or the creation of a new one – there are several ways RCRRA can make the site more attractive to potential partners and investors, including: Site Improvements and Considerations  A direct connection from the Waiting Room to the Riverfront. Two previous plans for the area, one adopted by the City and the other presented by the Lowertown Redevelopment Corporation, have envisioned bridges from the end of the Waiting Room over the freight rail tracks to Lower Landing. Although a bridge may prove quite difficult for the site, the idea of connecting the Waiting Room to Lower Landing is powerful: it would encourage the flow of traffic through the Waiting Room – the most difficult of Union Depot’s spaces to activate – bringing additional spending power through Union Depot and increasing the likelihood of retail success. A direct connection between the southern end of the waiting room and the riverfront below can therefore create significant economic value for the project. If a bridge is not feasible, RCRRA should explore alternative connections such as from the southern end of the Waiting Room to the riverfront below the freight railroads, through the former Warner Road loading dock.  Commitment to linear park development and anchor tenant attraction. The two recommended improvements to the Union Depot site outside of the building footprint – the establishment of a signature linear park that has the potential to lead to the Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary, and the attraction of a major anchor tenant for new vertical construction adjacent to the Kellogg Boulevard entrance pavilion – would improve the value of the site for potential investors by bringing additional foot traffic and disposable income to the area, as well as create an additional marketing opportunity. An RCRRA commitment to realizing these visions could help effectively market the project to investors.  Flexibility for the use of civic spaces and for building signage. The ability of potential private partners to
  • 33. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 33 help RCRRA fulfill its vision for Union Depot will depend in large part on the rights that can be established for the use of civic spaces and site areas. The Depot’s primary function is that of a multimodal transit hub and real estate uses or public programming should not be allowed to disrupt this core function. However, transit ridership is expected to use only one-third of interior civic spaces by 2035, leaving ample room for uses that complement and augment transit services. Nonetheless, RCRRA must clearly define the parameters for reuse that will allow the building to function as a multimodal transit hub and that give potential investor partners assurance of their development rights. Since the building is also a monumental civic edifice, designed as a railroad station and not a marketplace development venture, potential investor partners will need a level of assurance that they can outfit the building with historically-sensitive retail signage. Business Planning Refinement  A marketplace vendor demand analysis and feasibility assessment. The success of Union Depot’s retail program may depend to a large extent on the supply of high-quality small-business marketplace tenants that desire to open or expand their business in Union Depot. Since marketplace development is often locally-driven, particularly for public markets, a more detailed assessment of the potential for establishing one in Union Depot – from temporary or seasonal markets to a year-round permanent market – could both augment demand for the space by the development community and attract other government and philanthropic funds.  Letters of interest from potential tenants. There are several potential tenants that could add value to Union Depot both as a civic asset and as a development venture, including a permanent bicycle store and facility, an outlet of the Twin Cities Model Railroad Museum, and an office and visitors center for the National Park Service, whose presence could enhance connections to the Great River Park. While RCRRA should not commit to any particular tenant before selecting a partner, letters of interest could also help market the project to potential investors. Financial Tools and Public Funds  Legacy Amendment Funding. This landmark state program, supported by an increase in the state’s sales tax of three-eighths of one percent, has four separate funds, three of which should be considered to support Union Depot’s potential capital needs and ongoing operating expenses: the Arts and Culture Heritage Fund, targeted to arts, arts education, and arts access, as well as to preserve Minnesota’s history and cultural heritage, is expected to provide $54.5 million in grants in 2011, and would be well-suited to the recommended program for Union Depot development; the Parks and Trails Fund, estimated to be $39 million in 2011, is intended to support parks and trails of regional or statewide significance, and could support the development of Union Depot as a critical component of the state’s current premier park initiative, Great River Park; and the Clean Water Fund, estimated to be approximately $91 million in 2011, is intended to protect, enhance, and restore water quality in lakes, rivers, and groundwater, and could be leveraged for Union Depot’s public realm development projects and linear park connection to the Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary.  Government grants. There are several sources of grants from the federal government that can be used for the development and operations of public markets, including from the Departments of Commerce, Housing and Urban Development, Treasury, and Agriculture. Exploration of these funding sources, and a commitment to aggressively pursue them can help bring potential public market developers to the table. Other grants secured from City, County, and State governments will also increase the project’s chances for success  Low-cost loans. RCRRA or the County or City could choose to make low-cost loans available to its implementing partner to ease the burden of the capital costs and other start-up funds required for project success.
  • 34. 34 HR&A ADVISORS, INC. Summary of Economic Benefits from Union Depot’s Transit Infrastructure ($ millions, discounted at 7%) Source: AECOM Maximizing the Economic Benefits of Union Depot: Transit + Programming The Union Depot multimodal transportation hub project is estimated to produce significant economic benefits to Ramsey County and the City of Saint Paul. In addition to reducing vehicle miles traveled by more than 150 million annually by 2034 and saving commuters more than 630,000 hours of travel time each year – valued at nearly $12 million – an analysis by AECOM concluded that the present value of the project’s development benefits in Ramsey County will be nearly $450 million, and that total economic activity in the region will be nearly $565 million as a result of the project. These benefits include the construction of the Union Depot transit hub and the ongoing operations of its transit infrastructure, as well as the construction of projected development of more than 1,600 units of housing and nearly 1,600 new office and retail jobs. Although these projections are significant, they are based purely on the reactivation of the Depot as a multimodal transit hub; they do not consider the value that the recommended real estate activation and development strategy within the building can have on local economies. The Center for Transportation Studies at the University of Minnesota notes that the value increment of transit occurs not just from accessibility, but rather from accessibility to “desired destinations.” Without significant development and programming in and around the building, the Union Depot project will solve accessibility challenges, but will do little else to make Lowertown, downtown and the county more of a desired destination. The core development concept recommended for the Union Depot building – a distinctive mix of locally-based small-businesses combined with significant public programming – is driven not only by market factors that show the potential for development success, but also by its capacity to maximize the economic development benefits and catalytic potential of the Union Depot project, drawing on the power of cultural programming and public markets for success. Economic Benefits Ramsey County Region Union Depot Construction $27.7 $109.7 Union Depot Operations $5.6 $7.9 Surrounding Development Construction $10.7 $42.3 Permanent Jobs in Surrounding Development $404.9 $404.9 Total $448.9 $564.8
  • 35. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 35 Leveraging Culture for Economic Development Cultural programming has been proven to generate new economic activity and fiscal revenues in Saint Paul. The nonprofit arts industry alone generated more than $184 million in audience spending in 2004 – spending that helped the industry support more than 8,200 full- time jobs in the city, generate $243 million in household income to local residents, and produce $35 million in local and state government revenues. The Winter Carnival in downtown produces between $3.5 and $5 million in economic activity each year. These programs also have a profound impact on civic engagement and local pride: More than 13,400 volunteers donated nearly 300,000 hours to the city’s nonprofit arts and culture organizations in 2004. Artist communities and the spaces they occupy also have significant impacts on property values. This story has rung true from the artist revitalization of New York’s SoHo neighborhood to downtown development around the music and arts scene in downtown Austin, Texas, to medium and small-sized cities across the country. Lowertown has become a prime example of this arts-oriented economic development: a recent study found that the opening of the artist spaces in the Tilsner Artists’ Cooperative had an impact $20,000-$25,000 – 16-19% – per residential unit within a one-mile radius of the property. The neighborhood’s success in this regard was most recently lauded by Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, Rocco Landesman, who called Lowertown “Exhibit A” for how “art works” in developing local economies. Although development of new small businesses is often farther along the regeneration curve, arts districts are also becoming attractive neighborhoods for restaurants, retailers, and the companies of creative class service economies, as employers try to attract the best and brightest talent through neighborhood culture and amenities. This phenomenon has been particularly true in Lowertown, where the primary office tenancies are in software and technology, professional services, public relations and advertising, arts and design, nonprofits, and smaller government service companies – industries whose employees are often attracted to the types of arts and cultural amenities on offer in the neighborhood. The Tilsner Artists’ Cooperative in Lowertown, an ArtSpace project, has had double-digit impacts on surrounding property values, according to a recent study, through its provision of space for local artists. (mnartists.org) Patrons of the Saint Paul Art Crawl enjoy a multifaceted arts and cultural space at Peach Gallery in Lowertown, which National Endowment for the Arts Chairman Rocco Landesman called “Exhibit A” for the arts as an economic driver of downtown revitalization. (HR&A)
  • 36. 36 HR&A ADVISORS, INC. Public Markets: Driving Local Economic Growth Public markets exist – and have existed for thousands of years – to provide local goods producers an outlet to sell the fruits of their labor. They are small business incubators – places where entrepreneurs can go to start or expand retail and wholesale business ventures. But they are also a form of programming for public space – the most productive place-makers of the business world. They create vibrant, active civic spaces that attract people from all social, geographic, racial, and economic strata. It is hard to overstate the economic development potential of vibrant public markets. Although few data exist on the quantitative economic benefit of public markets, these benefits can generally be described as:  Small Business Development and Job Creation: Public markets tap into demand for small business creation and expansion. For example, Pike Place Market in Seattle was home to the first locations of Starbucks, Sur la Table, and other national retailers; it currently houses an average of 1,900 jobs annually, producing 3,600 more throughout the region.  Real Estate Value Increments: Public markets add value to surrounding properties both as vibrant public spaces and as amenities for residential, office, hotel, and retail spaces. This value creation potential was most recently seen in Lowertown, where the farmers market helped create an impetus for Heartland Restaurant to invest in 18,000 square feet adjacent to the market.  Increased Local Spending: Public markets provide opportunities to keep spending local, allowing the City and County to capture a greater percentage of the region’s spending capacity as market goers buy products and services produced in the local economy. They engender a virtuous cycle for local and regional economic development.  Augmented Fiscal Revenues: Ultimately, the new businesses, jobs, residents, and spending reinforce local tax rolls. New revenue is generated from sales taxes, property taxes, business and income taxes, hotel taxes, and other local government revenue sources, including public parking lots and ramps. A study of Pike Place Market found that properties in the market area generated approximately $3.9 million in local tax revenues in 2002. These clear economic and fiscal benefits that can be attributed to the development and operation of public marketplaces accrue in addition to their often more substantial, if less quantifiable, cultural and social impacts. These vibrant urban places and showcases for local products have significant potential to build civic pride and encourage healthy, sustainable lifestyles; social benefits that make public markets frequent recipients of government and philanthropic grants. Nonetheless, public markets can also often support higher leasing revenues than baseline rents command, due to their spatial configurations, management structures, and ability to establish critical mass in and of themselves. For the Union Depot project, a public marketplace would have an additional level of impact: done right, a public market would complement and drive traffic to the Saint Paul Farmers Market and Lowertown retailers. This phenomenon has been at the heart of the revitalization of downtowns and neighborhoods both large and small, as a critical mass of shopping typologies creates an identifiable destination district. A distinctive public market at Union Depot can help establish a “market district” in Lowertown that increases the demand profile for all Lowertown retail businesses.
  • 37. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 37 Recommended Plan of Action RCRRA should pursue four overarching steps to realize this vision over the next two years, by the time the ribbon is cut for the grand reopening of the Union Depot building. These actions are outlined in the order in which they should be taken, but all should commence as soon as possible: 1. Define the parameters that will govern the master lease of station areas, including parameters for the development of new pavilions within the Waiting Room and use of other civic spaces for leasing and/or events. This task will require careful planning with the design-build team and conversations with future transit tenants. The goal should be to maximize the flexibility of the building’s civic spaces for uses that can complement and augment transit uses. This task should be complete by the beginning of 2011. 2. Commence significant outreach to potential master lessees, including development organizations in Saint Paul and the Twin Cities region, as well as national and international development organizations – both for profit and not-for-profit. This project marketing task should be spearheaded by leadership both from Ramsey County and the City of Saint Paul, each of whom will be critical players for the success of the real estate development components of the project. Discussions should be held with major not-for-profit and for-profit development organizations, as well as with potential partner institutions and foundations that could provide additional support or be interested in helping to establish a new organization for Union Depot development. 3. Pursue efforts to make the project more marketable, including those related to site improvements, business planning for a public marketplace, and potential financial tools for project implementation listed earlier in this report. 4. Develop a solicitation process based on findings from initial outreach to potential private partners. A solicitation to potential developer partners should be issued no later than the end of the second quarter of 2011 in order designate a development partner with sufficient time to implement the first phase of the recommended program by the time the building opens in late 2012. Should demand from existing development organizations not come to fruition, explore the creation of a new not-for-profit in partnership with the City of Saint Paul and local business leaders, philanthropists, and foundations.
  • 39. UNION DEPOT ACTIVATION AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 39 Report Authors This report was written by HR&A Advisors, Inc., whose project team was led by President Eric Rothman and Senior Analyst Daniel Hochman Fuchs. Its findings and conclusions were developed by HR&A’s staff and a team of local consultants that included:  Cassidy Turley Martin Tucker, real estate market consultants;  Lake State Realty Services & Joe Urban, residential real estate specialists;  106 Group, historic preservation and development consultants;  The Bloom Companies, engineering consultants;  Ehlers & Associates, leaders in public finance; and  Urban Strategies, planning consultants. Previous Plans Analyzed The study considered several previous planning documents for the station area, the riverfront, and downtown, including, in chronological order:  1994 – Lowertown Small Area Plan  1997 – Saint Paul on the Mississippi Development Framework  2003 – LOCATE Task Force Report  2005 – Downtown Development Strategy  2005 – A Lens for the Future  2005 – Urban Village Vision*  2007 – Central Corridor Development Strategy  2008 – Economic Development Strategy  2009 – Downtown Station Area Plan Stakeholder Consultations The study included outreach to dozens of government officials and civic leaders, as well as private developers. Discussions held include, alphabetically:  Capital City Partnership  Capital River Council  City of Saint Paul Councilmember Dave Thune  City of Saint Paul Department of Planning & Economic Development  City of Saint Paul Office of the Mayor  Dakota County Regional Railroad Authority  Lowertown Entertainment District  Lowertown Masterplan Task Force  Lowertown Redevelopment Corporation  Metropolitan Council  Ramsey County  Saint Paul Area Chamber of Commerce  Saint Paul BOMA  Saint Paul Riverfront Corporation  Urban Land Institute-coordinated real estate roundtable  Washington County Regional Railroad Authority