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Exceeding
Expectations
at Nebraska
Medicine in the U.S.
Living out
the golden years
in an engaging
environment
Relying on the power
of medical hypnosis
with Dr. Fabienne Roelants
and Dr. Christine Watremez
Healthcare facilities international review
No. 04
14
2
Editorial Committee: Patrick Boulier (Latin America) - Patrick Connolly (USA);
Willy Gautier (France); Simon Scrivens (UK) - Stuart Winters (Asia Australia).
Editor-in-chief:SophieDelaval. Editorialcoordination:KashaKruse. Research,
copy, design and layout: . Journalists: Trevor Huggins, Lori Tomonari,
Victoria Nagel Hauzy. Photo credits: Bea Uhart/CAPA Pictures (p. 2-7); DR/B.
Lara Arrambide, DR/B. Clipper, DR/J. Ogunkeye, DR/B. Pauget, DR/C. Chevillard,
DR/C. Brooks, DR/M. Klaffke (p. 10-13); Jessica Chou/CAPA Pictures (p. 14-17);
Ryan Donnell (p. 18-30); Grundini (p. 31-33); Samsung Electronics Switzerland
(p. 33); iStock 2015 (p. 34); ECPAF/France/2013/Jérôme Salles (p. 35); Sodexo
photo library (p. 36-37).
Clinical anesthesiologists Dr. Fabienne Roelants and
Dr. Christine Watremez explain why and how medical
hypnosis helps to improve the quality of a patient’s
experience before, during and after surgery. Explore this
issue further in the Meet the Experts section.
Dr. Brad Britigan, President of Nebraska Medicine and
Dean of University of Nebraska Medical Center’s College
of Medicine, Dr. Alan Langnas, Director of Liver
Transplantation and Dr. Phil Smith, Medical Director
of the Biocontainment Unit, Nebraska Medicine explain
how this facility raised the bar on patient care and
safety in the Life Size section.
Dr. Betsabé Lara Arrambide, Mexican doctor, Centro
Médico Sabinas; John Ogunkeye, American CFO,
Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education;
Bonnie Clipper, American author and Chief Nursing
Officer, Medical Center of the Rockies; Dr. Bertrand
Pauget, French Research Professor of Management,
European Business School of Paris; Christiane
Chevillard, French Project Manager, National
Association for the Education of Hospital Staff, and
Christopher Brooks, British Senior Policy Manager
for Consumer and Community, Age UK, examine
the multi-generational workforce from all angles in
the Issues and Topics section.
Carissa Kelly, Director of Lifestyle and Activities,
The Terraces of Phoenix, Richard Nix, Sodexo Director
of Dining Services, The Terraces of Phoenix, and
Michael Ramscar, Clinical Researcher with the
Linguistics Department of the University of Tübingen,
Germany, share what it means to age successfully in
the Aging Well section.
Peggy Theile, Sodexo Senior Brand Manager of Patient
Transport, explains how a unified approach to transport
services fosters a more caring environment for patients
as well as greater continuity and efficiency in the
User Guide section.
“Hypnosis can be quite empowering as
it enables
the patient
to become
a main actor
in the overall care process.”
Contributors
Exceeding
Expectations AT
Nebraska
Medicine in
the U.S.
18
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 1
Contents
02 Meet the Experts
	Perfecting the art of medical
hypnosis as an alternative
to traditional anesthesia.
08 Quality of Life Trends and Figures
	Key learnings from Sodexo’s
International Leaders' Survey.
10  Quality of Life Issues and Topics
	Addressing the challenges and
opportunities created by the
multi-generational workforce in
hospitals.
14 Aging Well
	Improving Quality of Life as we age
means focusing on growing and
not just growing older.
18 Life Size
	Going above and beyond the expected
at Nebraska Medicine.
29 User Guide
	Revamping transport services to improve
patient care and hospital efficiency.
32 Sodexo News Around the World
	A review of Sodexo’s recent initiatives
and partnerships that improve Quality
of Life.
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 2
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 3
Meet the Experts
In response to patients’
requests for alternatives
to traditional anesthesia,
anesthesiologists at the
Saint-Luc University Hospital
in Brussels, Belgium, have
perfected the art of medical
hypnosis with surprisingly
beneficial effects on both
the body and the mind.
Dr. Fabienne Roelants
and Dr. Christine Watremez
MEDICAL
HYPNOSISPOWERFUL ON THE MIND,
GENTLE ON THE BODY
bio
Clinical anesthesiologists
Dr. Fabienne Roelants
and Dr. Christine
Watremez helped
develop the use of
hypnosis in the operating
theater at the Saint-Luc
University Hospital
in Brussels.
Throughout their careers,
they have participated
in many international
conferences and written
countless articles on
the benefits of hypnosis.
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 4
Meet the Experts
Dr. Fabienne Roelants and Dr. Christine Watremez,
both clinical anesthesiologists trained in medical hypnosis,
explain why and how this innovative technique helps
improve the quality of a patient’s experience before, during
and after surgery.
Dr. Fabienne Roelants,
Clinical anesthesiologist at the Saint-Luc University Hospital in Brussels
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 5
When surgery was recommended for a breast cancer patient
at Saint-Luc University Hospital, the patient requested that
it be done under medical hypnosis, as she had previously
experienced severe nausea from general anesthesia. While she
responded and recovered extremely well, a full mastectomy
was recommended when the cancer unfortunately returned.
Once again, she requested surgery under hypnosis. After this
second, far more difficult operation was over, the patient had
a surprisingly optimistic impression of the entire process.
How do you explain this patient’s incredibly
positive reaction to an operation that would
typically leave many women devastated?
—
Dr. Fabienne Roelants: Medical hypnosis calls upon certain
resources from within the patient that enable him or her to
attain a natural state of modified consciousness, generally
by reliving a pleasant memory or experience. Because this
particular patient’s life had been very difficult—she had no
real positive memories to speak of—the hypnosis allowed
her to experience something completely new. By using her
imagination, she was able to leave the rest of her life behind
for a while and escape. Her mastectomy became secondary
in importance to her experience under hypnosis.
So how does medical hypnosis work?
—
Dr. Christine Watremez: First of all, the surgeons identify
patients that are particularly receptive to the concept of
hypnosis. We then conduct a general medical exam and
ensure that they understand the hypnotic process. We ask
the patient to think about a pleasant memory. Then, at the
time of the operation, by using specific words and speaking
in a particular tone of voice, and by focusing on certain parts 
“Hypnosis can be quite empowering as
it enables the
patient to become
a main actor
in the overall care process.”
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 6
Meet the Experts
of the body, we help them relive their memory and arrive at
this desired modified state. Our role is to accompany and
monitor the patient very closely. If the operation becomes
more complicated and hypnosis is no longer appropriate, we
administer general anesthesia with the patient’s approval.
What is the draw of hypnosis?
—
F.R.: Today, many patients are looking for a more natural,
and less medicated approach to their care. Some patients
have also had negative experiences with general anesthesia
in the past and fear these experiences will be repeated.
Are certain surgical interventions more successful
than others?
—
C.W.: The success of medical hypnosis depends on the
patient as well as the type of procedure. For hypnosis to
work, the patient’s cooperation and motivation are essen-
tial, as is their trust in us. Furthermore, it’s not for every
type of surgery. Studies and our own personal experience
show that hypnosis is very successful for certain surface
procedures, such as thyroid interventions, breast cancer,
plastic and reconstructive surgeries, hernias, vascular issues,
colonoscopies and in-vitro fertilization (IVF).
What are the risks and main benefits?
—
F.R.: So far we have only observed benefits. Compared to
general anesthesia, patients experience less post-operative
pain, fatigue, nausea and vomiting. They need less pain
medication, they recover faster, and, as a result, spend
less time in the hospital. In addition, scarring tends to be
minimized. As for IVF, there are more successful pregnancies
when medical hypnosis is used than when it is not used.
How does hypnosis improve the patient’s overall
Quality of Life?
—
C.W.: While hypnosis offers numerous physical benefits, it
can also be quite empowering as it enables the patient to
become a main actor in the overall care process. Hypnosis
also provides a positive experience that patients can call upon
later in their lives. We teach patients a technique and they
can, to a certain degree, induce this state of modified con-
sciousness themselves during life’s more stressful moments.
“We develop
a deeper
relationship
with the patient
that gives us all a new
perspective on our profession
that is more open-minded.”
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 7
What is your relationship with the surgeon and
the nurses when medical hypnosis is involved?
—
F.R.: For the comfort and well-being of the patient, it is criti-
cal that we get along well with the surgeon and the nurses in
the operating theater. We work side by side in a calm, precise,
collaborative manner. As we have an active role through the
entire surgery, we work very closely with the surgeons, who
consult with us before each important decision.
What impact does this technique have on the
medical team?
—
C.W.: A very human exchange takes place in the operating
theater. We develop a deeper relationship with the patient
that gives us all a new more human and open-minded
perspective on our profession. This collaborative approach
tends to impact our interactions and relations with other
colleagues, creating a more harmonious overall work
environment.
Contact Dr. Fabienne Roelants and Dr. Christine Watremez
at fabienne.roelants@uclouvain.be
and christine.watremez@uclouvain.be
Watch a medical
team at Saint-
Luc University
conduct a surgery
under hypnosis.
This report from
Euronews Science
by the Associated
Press was filmed
in 2011.
Watch the video
interview on
the Quality of Life
Observer.
Dr. Christine Watremez,
Clinical anesthesiologist at the Saint-Luc University Hospital in Brussels
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 8
Quality of Life Trends and Figures
Leaders in hospital recognize
Quality of Life as
a strategic priority
today and
for the future
*The Sodexo Institute for Quality of Life gathers and develops insight on the drivers of Quality of Life and their impact on performance.
FOCUS ON QUALITY
OF LIFE: A TOP PRIORITY
FOR HEALTHCARE DECISION-MAKERS
The Sodexo Institute for Quality of Life* conducted the first international survey
dedicated to Quality of Life as a factor of performance. The study was conducted among
780 top leaders and key decision makers from three different sectors (Corporate, Healthcare and
Universities) across six countries (United States, United Kingdom, France, Brazil, India and China).
Discover the responses from leaders in today’s hospitals.
Quality of Life is
already in action
Quality of Life initiatives implemented in healthcare
facilities concern the following key areas:
Out of all the leaders from hospitals surveyed:
91%
Physical environment
Everything that contributes to a patient’s safety and
comfort—including room furniture and equipment,
spaces with low noise levels, optimal temperatures,
facility maintenance and comfortable visiting areas.
86%
Health and nutrition
All aspects that support patient well-being, from tasty
and nutritious meals to on-site physical activities.
81%
Ease and efficiency
Factors—such as reduced waiting time, flexible meal
hours, streamlined patient transport—that impact
a patient’s ability to carryout activities smoothly with
minimal interruptions.
72%
Social interactions
Various components that help to strengthen bonds
among patients and their families, such as access to
welcoming group activities and on-site entertainment
and events.
56%
have a dedicated budget
76%
have a dedicated program
that increases staff awareness of the importance
of Quality of Life
The political pressure of new laws and regulations
as well as the increasing demands of patients drives
leaders to focus on Quality of Life.
79%view Quality of Life improvement
as a growing
future challenge
90%of leaders from
hospitals
“totally agree” that they place a high level
of importance on improving Quality of Life
in their organization.
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 9
Log on to
the Qualityoflifeobserver.com
and discover:
An overview and datawall of
complete study results and
a downloadable study abstract
Take the quiz to compare your
organization’s Quality of Life
performance with other top
organizations in the healthcare sector
Source: Sodexo Quality of Life International Leaders’ Survey, conducted by international market research firm Harris Interactive, 2015.
60% OF LEADERS
IN HOSPITALS IDENTIFIED
THE LINK BETWEEN QUALITY OF LIFE
AND PERFORMANCE
Patient satisfaction
Image and reputation
Staff efficiency
Business and economic performance
Quality of care
1
2
3
4
5
+
The Quality of Life initiatives often involve several leaders,
which reflects the level of importance healthcare organizations
place on this issue.
QUALITY OF LIFE
IS A PRIORITY
throughoutthehealthcarefacility
Leaders are aware that investing in Quality of Life is not
just a question of budget. While cost was the most cited
obstacle (58%), leaders also identified challenges such as:
What
challenges
remaiN?
patient
care
manager
top
quality
manager
medical
officer
nursing
officer
people
in charge of
quality of life
in hospital
Hospital
CEO
hospital
coo
Professionalizing practices
Better implementing programs
Enabling a cultural
transformation in their organization
Want to learn more
about this study?
For these leaders, a focus on Quality of Life
improves performance in the following areas:
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 10
Quality of Life Issues and Topics
In today’s hospitals, three generations of nurses, doctors and staff
currently work side-by-side. With this mix of ages also comes varied
expectations and working styles. These differences can either
create tension or can produce opportunities.
As the multi-generational workforce is present across all cultures
and continents, experts from around the globe offer insight on how
to make the most of what each generation has to offer.
Gen X
born 1963-1980
Many Gen Xers
witnessed widespread
corporate downsizing
throughout their
careers. They are often
highly independent and
also seek a mix of
advanced career options
and a balance between
their personal and
professional lives.
Gen Y
born 1980-2000
Having grown up
surrounded by
technology, Gen Yers
are used to “instant”
communication and
response. They are
optimistic, inclusive
and seek answers.
They enjoy group
work and have an
entrepreneurial spirit.
Baby
Boomers
born 1946-1963
Occupying a high
number of leadership
positions, Boomers
are considered
to be dedicated and
loyal workers. At the
same time they are
known to be competitive
and like to challenge
the rules.
Source: Generational Differences in the Workplace: Personal Values, Behaviors, and Popular Beliefs, Journal of Diversity Management, 2009.
Managing
staff across
the ages
at the hospital
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 11
AN ONLINE
MULTI-GENERATIONAL
RESOURCE HUB
Based on interviews conducted with
French hospital managers,
the ANFH developed an online
informational resources platform
on the multi-generational workforce.
This tool provides key insights on
how to unite intergenerational teams
while respecting the differences of
each generation. ANFH hospital managers
can deepen their understanding of
the issues through testimonials,
case studies, articles and best practices
shared on this online information hub.
This resource has also since been used
to create regional training programs.
60%of hospital
managers
deal with
intergenerational
tension between
staff members
Christiane Chevillard,
Project Manager, National
Association for the training of
Hospital Staff (ANFH), France.
Understanding what makes
generations different
Bonnie Clipper,
Chief Nursing Officer, Medical
Center of the Rockies, and
author of The Nurse Manager’s
Guide to an Intergenerational
Workforce, 2012, USA.
“It is crucial for nursing
managers to take the time
to learn what is important to
each generation. Successful
management hinges on our
ability to reduce generational
conflict, promote engagement
and take advantage of what
these differences bring to the
table. Without overgeneralizing,
we must find what works for
each age group. For example,
Xers tend to value their
independence and seek a
healthy work-life balance, while
Gen Y favors group activities
and feedback. Given this
assessment, we can maximize
Gen Y’s engagement by avoiding
micromanagement styles and
involving them in decision-
making processes and leadership
opportunities.
It is also crucial to recognize that
these differences cannot simply
be attributed to one’s age.
In this past decade for example,
the sheer size of Gen Y has made
the college acceptance process
extremely competitive. Growing
up surrounded by this type of
rivalry, the competitive spirit
comes rather naturally to Gen Y
—particularly when compared
to Xers who come from a much
smaller generation.
Acquisition and management of
quality employees is the most
important issue we as managers
face. As such, we must focus on
building our understanding of
generational differences and why
these differences exist.”
“We must find what works
for each age group and
customize communication and
leadership styles to
allow each generation
to be successful and
fulfilled in the workplace.”
Source: Managing an Intergerational Workforce:
strategies for Health Care Transformation,
American Hospital Association, 2014.
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 12
Quality of Life Issues and Topics
50%or more
of younger
employees
are
dismissive oF
their older
colleagues’
abilities
Dr. Bertrand Pauget,
Research Professor of
Management, European
Business School of Paris,
France. He co-conducted
a study with Dr. Ahmed
Dammak between 2011
and 2013 exploring
managers’ perceptions
of Generation Y.
“The debate over the generations
needs to shift: WE NEED TO FOCUS ON
making organizations evolve rather
than solving the problem of a single
generation.”
What are some takeaways from
your survey on perceptions of
Gen Y in the healthcare industry?
—
The notion of generations refers to
people of the same age group who
share the same codes, practices and
place within a society. Each has been
similarly “shaped” by the historical
events of their time. My study reveals
that older generations tend to view
Gen Y as one that struggles with
conventional hierarchy and instead
places a great deal of value on
individual abilities; demands for better
work-life balance; lacks dedication;
and is by nature hyperconnected.
But these generalizations are
somewhat unfair. If you think about it,
older generations had some of the
same expectations—they are simply
more visible today. For example,
technology creates the need to set
boundaries that weren’t needed before.
Previous generations were able to
completely detach from work once they
left. Today, work responsibilities are
ever-present with the arrival of
smartphones. Gen Y is simply the
first generation that has had to set
these limits.
Why is it that Gen Y in
particular faces such heavy
criticism?
—
The massive wave of Gen Y, which is
much larger than Gen X, entered the
workforce in mid-2000, at the same
time that the first boomers began
to hit retirement age. The reputation
they developed among older
colleagues for shunning authority or
not investing themselves enough in
their work has more to do with the
fact that their arrival simply threw
off the balance of the workforce.
What do these perceptions
of Gen Y reveal about
the workforce in general?
—
The criticisms facing Gen Y reveal
a deeper problem. The arrival of
younger workers highlights the
difficulties institutions face in
revamping practices and adapting to
changing expectations. Instead of
thinking in terms of age,
organizations would benefit from
cross-generational processes
focused on motivating the entire
workforce and increasing
performance.
Are we too quick
to judge Generation Y?
Source: Managing Human Behavior in
Public and Nonprofit Organizations,
Robert B. Denhardt, Janet V. Denhardt,
Maria P. Aristigueta, 2013.
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 13
“A NEW NORMAL IS BEING DEFINED
BY THE CHANGing SYSTEM AND
THE OUTLOOK OF NEW GENERATIONS.”
Christopher Brooks,
Senior Policy Manager for
Consumer and Community
at Age UK*, United Kingdom.
* Age UK is the country’s largest charity dedicated to
inspiring, enabling and supporting older people.
The inherent expectation of a Boomer doctor is to work
15 hours a day—that’s just the way it’s always been done.
But Gen X and Y are looking for moderation and using
every tool at their disposal to work faster and more efficiently.
These expectations align with the changing times.
“Today’s doctors aren’t paid based on the number of patients
they see, but rather the quality of service they provide,”
says Ogunkeye. “So it’s not about how long we work, but
how smart we work.”
Given the large age gap between
Boomers and Gen Y, a mentor-
mentee relationship somewhat
naturally occurs. “What I like most
about Boomer doctors is the incredibly
vast amount of information they hold,”
says Dr. Betsabé Lara Arrambide,
a 25-year-old doctor in Mexico.
“My generation has benefitted from
technology—we have everything we’ve
ever learned at our fingertips on our cell
phones—but we have become quite
reliant on it.” Boomers on the other hand,
who studied volumes of textbooks, have
always internalized their knowledge.
“They learned the old-school way,” says
Dr. Arrambide. “And it’s pretty amazing
that they always have the answer.”
THE KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER
FROM BOOMERS TO GEN Y
Dr. Betsabé
Lara Arrambide,
Centro Médico
Sabinas, Mexico.
KEEPING EXPERTISE
IN THE WORKFORCE
“We see quite often that older
employees are choosing to wind down
slowly into retirement by working
shorter days or fewer days a week.
Flexible work in general, including
voluntarily switching to part-time work,
is on an upward trend and is likely to
continue through the years.
This increased flexibility,
if implemented properly, can be
beneficial for everyone involved.
For older employees, it can be easier to
gradually transition into retirement
rather than to suddenly stop working.
But it makes a lot of sense for
organizations as well. Healthcare
facilities can retain the career-long
expertise of this generation in the labor
market for a longer period of time. In
addition, both younger and older
employees benefit from the transfer of
skills—which goes both ways.”
John Ogunkeye,
CFO, Accreditation Council for
Graduate Medical Education,
USA.
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 14
Aging Well
T
he Terraces of Phoenix is
one of 43 senior communi-
ties managed by American
Baptist Homes of the West,
a charitable organization dedicated to
helping seniors stay engaged and live
life to the fullest. Originally founded as
Orangewood in 1959, The Terraces of
Phoenix is a senior community where
residents really want to be, thanks to
its partnership with Masterpiece Liv-
ing. This program promotes success-
ful aging through ideas and tools that
educate, train, coach and track success.
Focusing on the mind,
body and soul
“Masterpiece Living embodies our belief
in maximizing residents’ potential,
no matter their limitation,” explains
Carissa Kelly, Director of Lifestyle and
Activities at The Terraces of Phoenix.
“Every staff member has a different job
but our roles are the same. We are com-
mitted to encouraging and empowering
our residents to take ownership of their
aging experience.” Masterpiece Living
helps create the kind of environment
in which all residents can continue to
grow and develop.
The four pillar approach
Home to 323 people between the ages
of 70 and over 100, The Terraces of
Phoenix is organized into four different
levels of living: independent, assisted,
memory support and the health
center. The 50 recurring activities,
offered multiple times a week, or on
a weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis,
are tailored and adapted to each differ-
ent level. They are designed to provide
residents with a spiritual, intellectual,
social and physical balance—what
Masterpiece Living calls its four-pillar
approach to successful aging.
Never a dull moment
An integral part of the Masterpiece Liv-
ing approach is Mindful, a mind-body-
spirit program that works the brain and
keeps the body healthy. Other spiritu-
ally focused activities include round-
table discussions on topics such as
“How Happiness Thinks” and “Chicken
Soup for the Soul,” guided meditations,
Tai Chi, and a chorale group called Sing
and Be Happy. These activities uplift
the spirit, and provide residents with
a sense of purpose and an opportu-
nity to connect with something big-
ger than themselves. Food for Thought,
held twice a month, is a small current
Residents enjoy
participating in
dinnertime
debates with guest
speakers (top right).
Following the
discussion, they
observe live cooking
demonstrations with
Sodexo’s Chef
Stephen Love
(bottom right).
It’s never too late
to learn and growat the terraces of Phoenix
“Right where you want to be” is the signature tagline for the senior living
community in Arizona, that operates on the belief that helping residents
continue to grow contributes to their successful aging.
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 15
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 16
Aging Well
events discussion group held over din-
ner. It was introduced when The Ter-
races of Phoenix learned that their
residents’ greatest preoccupation is
the current state of the world. This
event allows them to articulate their
opinions, learn from and listen to oth-
ers, exchange ideas and information,
and build confidence.
a wide selection of
top quality classes
“Studies show that greater involvement,
and more connections and physical
movement result in a better immune
system, longer life and an overall higher
sense of well-being,” says Kelly. Based on
this research, The Terraces of Phoenix
recently launched Terraces University,
an on-site innovative program providing
continuing education. While receiving
credits, residents can choose from a
wide selection of top-quality classes
based on the same four-pillar approach.
Everything from practical economics
to religious studies, computer literacy
and physical fitness are part of the
curriculum. Additional seasonal out-
ings, parties, speakers, entertainers and
workshops complete the busy calendar
and encourage residents to continue
to build meaningful connections and
make new friends.
the big picture
Kelly sums up Masterpiece Living at The
Terraces of Phoenix in a way that speaks
as much to society at large as it does
to the individual. “Residents come here
to live the best years of their lives and
to be really engaged. In providing them
with this kind of environment we aim to
change the public’s perception of aging.
We keep the bar high to let our residents
know that we believe in them and in their
capacity to age successfully.”

Celebrating
birthdays at the
Terraces of Phoenix
is a joyous occasion
for everyone.
“Dining is an
integral part of life
here and often sets the tone for
the rest of the day. Our Chef Stage Center
program features Executive Chef
Stephen Love and our registered
Sodexo dietician, Lauren Richardson,
in a live cooking demonstration.
We focus on nutritious, flavorful meals,
including gluten-free, vegetarian and
sustainably grown options that align
with the successful aging physical
component we encourage.
Drinks with Richard is a twice-monthly
happy hour for cocktails, appetizers
and conversation. Grille at the Terraces
is a reservations-only, multi-course
gourmet meal complete with paired
wines, live piano playing, and
tuxedo-suited waiters. We believe that
meals should be a time to enjoy
good food and good company in
a supportive and stimulating
atmosphere that feels like home.”
Richard Nix, Sodexo Director of Dining
Services, The Terraces of Phoenix
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 17
Our brain is a non-stop learn-
ing machine. We absorb new infor-
mation all the time. The healthy aging brain,
like the younger brain, continues to accumulate
knowledge.
For every action there is an equal and oppo-
site reaction. Whenever our brain learns a skill in
one area, it does so by slightly turning down skills in
other areas. We cannot go through life continuously
learning and maintain the same rate or accuracy with
which we access a memory. Some things are going to
get harder as we get older. That’s the price we pay for
knowing more.
Talk about brain atrophy is seriously
overblown. When comparing the non-diseased
brains of a healthy 20-year-old and a healthy
70-year-old, there is no significant difference
between them in terms of the
number of brain neurons. The
main neural changes are a
reduction of grey matter and a
reorganization of white matter.
This is the consequence of
learning, and is to be expected.
The Myth of
Cognitive Decline
by Dr. Michael Ramscar
5 things to know about
bio
Dr. Michael Ramscar 
is a Clinical Researcher
with the Linguistics
Department at the
University of Tübingen,
in Germany.
His research on
the learning capacity
of a healthy brain
throughout a lifetime
has led to a new
appreciation of the
accumulation of
knowledge in aging
adults.
Your brain is part of your body, so keeping your
heart healthy keeps your brain healthy. In fact, vascular
health is an overwhelming predictor of brain health. The more peo-
ple realize that everything in their body is interconnected, the more
motivation they will have to care for
their bodies, which of course, in turn
will help them care for their minds.
It’s very difficult to meas-
ure how much we learn
because the statistics of
human experience are
skewed. Our intuitive thinking
about memory tends to ignore
that each of us is over-specialized
in some things and knows nothing about other
things, just as it tends to ignore the permanent
state of learning that exists in all healthy brains.
How and what we learn is far more complex than
what we can intuitively grasp.
“The brains of older
people do not get weak.
On the contrary,
they simply
know more.”2
4
3
5
1
Surgeons in the
operating room
of Nebraska Medicine.
19
Life Size
Nebraska
Medicine
Going above and
beyond expectations
in patient care
Known for its top quality, innovative and
highly specialized clinical care, Nebraska Medicine is also
a home away from home where patients find
themselves in a warm, embracing community
that puts them at the center of every step
of their treatment and healing process.
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 20
Life Size
D
r. Rick S. and journal-
ist Ashoka M. were both
seriously ill with the Ebola
virus when they arrived at
Nebraska Medicine’s Biocontainment
Unit in the fall of 2014. They received
about two and a half weeks of intensive
care with medical staff in the room at
all times, and the support of a large
multi-disciplinary team that included
a virologist, a psychologist and a social
worker. Following treatment, they fully
recovered and returned to Africa earlier
this year.
This type of specialized personal-
ized 24/7 care for Ebola patients is
not available just anywhere. Nebraska
Medicine’s Biocontainment Unit  is
one of only three in the U.S. In 2004,
when Nebraska Medicine appropriated
an unused pediatric transplant ward
equipped with its own air-handling
system and five bubble-like rooms,
for Dr. Phil Smith, Medical Director
of the Biocontainment Unit, it was
“a dream come true.” The walls and
ceilings were rendered impervious to
bacteria; the unit’s airflow system was
re-engineered to enable continuous,
fail-safe air purifying exchanges, and
a specially designed two-door auto-
clave was installed.
Crossing between “clean” and
“dirty” zones of the Biocontain-
ment Unit requires donning and doff-
ing head-to-toe Personal Protection
“The actions of our team
far exceed what’s expected
of them. Our nurses
build strong, meaningful
relationships with
the patients.”
Kate Boulter, Lead Clinical Nurse
at the Biocontainment Unit
Kate Boulter, Lead
Clinical Nurse makes
patient safety and
well-being a top
priority in the
Biocontainment Unit.
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 21

“Nebraska
Medicine
provides the
highest quality
of medical care
with a focus on optimizing
the experience of the patients and
their families. This is the meaning
of “Serious Medicine, Extraordinary
Care,” our tagline and modus
operandi. Our mission is
to provide a breadth and depth of
medical services in tertiary and
quaternary care balanced with
a patient-centric approach
that considers the whole patient
and family and speaks to the more
humanistic component of caring.
As partners with Nebraska’s
only public medical school and
teaching hospital, it is also our
mission to train the state’s next
generation of care providers in
the importance of understanding
this critical balance.”
Dr. Brad Britigan,
Nebraska Medicine Interim President
and Dean of UNMC’s College of Medicine
Equipment (PPE). “Mutual trust is
essential to the performance of our
team, with the doffer playing one of the
most important roles,” says Dr. Smith.
Ensuring safety is not the only
critical aspect of Ebola care. Equally
important is meeting the patient’s
socio-psychological needs. “The actions
of our team far exceed what’s expected
of them,” says Kate Boulter, Lead
Clinical Nurse at the Biocontainment
Unit. “They build strong, meaningful
relationships with the patients, which
helps to improve the overall quality
of their lives while they are with us.”
One nurse learned how to play chess;
another arrived one day with home-
made chicken soup; and another read
the same book as the patient so they
could discuss it together.
Such acts of genuine caring paired
with the delivery of some of the most
advanced medical care have made
Nebraska Medicine the hub of medical
expertise in the region.
The care expertise of this distinguished
establishment dates back many dec-
ades. Today, it represents the clini-
cal integration of Nebraska Medical
Center, Bellevue Medical Center and
University of Nebraska Medical Center
(UNMC) Physicians clinics. It is also the
clinical and academic partner of the
UNMC. Well known for its transplanta-
tion services, Nebraska Medicine also
specializes in oncology, cardiology
“We came here because it’s the best care
you’ll ever get. The team is wonderful.
They speak to you straight and know
how to communicate.”
Tonora M., mother of a multi-organ transplant patient
Tonora M. shares
a warm moment  
with her son Brendon’s
transplantation
surgeon Dr. Wendy
J. Grant.
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 22
Life Size
“Austin was 15 months old when he had his first
liver transplant. Today, he is 20-years old, so we have
a long history here. When the team comes in, they look
at the whole picture. It’s all about Austin.”
Emiley G., Austin’s mother
and neurology, and provides services
in some 50 additional specialties to
patients state-, nation- and world-
wide. Nebraska Medicine has a staff
that includes thousands of physicians
and nurses.
Serious Medicine, Extraordinary
Care manifests in other remarkable
ways, notably at the Lied Transplant
Center. This is one of the leading
centers in the country for solid organ
(kidney, liver, pancreas, small bowel,
and intestine, bone marrow, heart and
soon, lung transplants). “The Quality
of Life component, whether it’s for
newborns, patients with multi-organ
transplants or those in intestinal rehab
programs, is an essential part of it,”
explains Dr. Alan Langnas, Director
of Liver Transplantation. Previously,
patients with organ failure were told
they had a fatal, irreversible disease
and were left without hope of recov-
ery. Today, Nebraska Medicine offers
innovative programs and procedures
that enable most transplant patients
to lead normal lives.
While medical and technological
advances are important, Dr. Langnas
especially emphasizes family, phy-
sician and patient interactions, and
the engagement, thoughtfulness and
commitment of the transplantation
team. The multi-disciplinary team of
surgeons, physicians, pediatricians,
dieticians, nurses, coordinators, social
“our job is
to reassure
Patients
and make them feel comfortable
and safe. When they arrive, we like
to say that we give them a warm
Nebraska welcome. For patients
to be successful they have to be
active participants in their own
healing; there has to be
a partnership between the
caregiver and the care-receiver.”
Dr. Alan Langnas, Director
of Liver Transplantation
The transplant
surgeon regularly
visits Austin G.,
a 20-years old liver
transplant patient.
23
“I am a healthy
liverTransplant
survivor of 17 years. I work at
the hotel located within
Nebraska Medicine and speak
with patients who are struggling
with the process. It reassures
them to know that I am one of
them. The whole concept of the
hotel is to make sure that
everyone feels safe and supported.
Some families with little babies
may stay for a year. I make sure
they have everything they need.”
David Eggers, Concierge, Guest
Services, Nebraska House
A mother wheels
her son, a very
young transplant
patient, through
the food hall for
a special treat.
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 25
Life Size
“Art and nature
have the power
to inspire,relieve stress
and heal patients, families, clinical
and support staff. So, in
partnership with the Joslyn Art
Museum of Omaha, we are
building a healing arts program
and a healing garden that will be
available to all. In addition,
technology will be used to enhance
the cancer patient’s healing
process. Patients will have an iPad
in their room to be used as part
of the healing arts program and as
a health-monitoring device. It is
our hope that this cancer center’s
approach to care and to cancer
research will enable a powerful,
unprecedented and transformative
experience for everyone.”
Dr. Ken Cowan, Director,
Fred  Pamela Buffett Cancer Center
“My attending nurses are kind,
comforting and friendly. They speak right
to me and they are there in a heartbeat whenever
I need them. I can count on them for anything.”
Mark B., stem cell transplant patient
workers and psychiatrists also prides
itself on providing communication,
education and support during every step
of the journey,” concludes Dr. Langnas. It
is the combination of medical expertise
and the assurance of hope, communi-
cation and genuine human armth that
ensures the Quality of Life and healing.
The new Fred  Pamela Buffett Can-
cer Center, a joint project between
Nebraska Medicine and UNMC, elevates
the term multi-disciplinary to new
heights. Currently under construction
with a 2017 completion date, the center
will include a 10-story, 98 lab, state-of-
the-art research tower that integrates
the science of what causes and drives
cancer with the care of cancer patients.
With this truly integrated approach, all
the research, consultations, multi-dis-
ciplinary cancer expertise (lymphoma,
transplantation, pancreatic, bone
marrow, breast, head and neck, lung)
and patient care will come together
under the same roof. The center will
also house offices, operating rooms,
radiation and chemotherapy rooms,
physicians’ offices, a seven-story,
108-bed inpatient treatment center, a
multi-disciplinary outpatient center, a
175-seat restaurant, and other cancer
specialty services—physical therapists,
nutritionists, socio-financial advisors,
psychologists, child and family care
specialists, massage therapists and
socio-estheticians. “The goal is that
we want to provide one-stop shopping
Mark B., a stem
cell transplant
patient, having a
laugh with his Nurse
and Case Manager.
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 26
Life Size
1,200nutritious and delicious patient
meals served each day by
Sodexo’s At Your Request Room Service.
“Food and
nutrition is
an essential
component
of the patient’s experience and
sense of well-being at Nebraska
Medicine. Whether it’s for the meal
program, At Your Request Room
Service, which serves 1,200 patient
meals a day, or for one of the
three sit-down venues for staff
and visitors, the food meets four
critical criteria. It must be safe,
nutritious, healthy and delicious.
We must be sure that everything
we deliver is as requested by
the patient, and respects
their dietary restrictions. We are
a key part of the patient’s
healthcare and have an obligation
to be precise.”
Cathy Miedl,
Sodexo Head of Hotel Services
A member of Sodexo’s
Clinical Technical
Management team,
verifies the proper
functioning of medical
equipment.
for our cancer patients, and bring clini-
cians and researchers closer together,”
says Dr. Ken Cowan, Director, Fred 
Pamela Buffett Cancer Center.
Nebraska Medicine would not be able
to execute its mission without its 2,500
nurses, the largest sector of more than
7,000-person workforce. Nurses pro-
mote relationship-based care sharing
—meaning they care for themselves,
colleagues, and first and foremost,
patients and their families. “In order
to meet our patients’ every need, we
must be able to step back and examine
our processes to ensure that we deliver
the highest level of care for a successful
recovery,” says Rosanna Morris, Chief
Nursing Officer and interim CEO of
Nebraska Medicine. “Our shared gov-
ernance structure allows us to do that.”
Nurse committees manage areas such
as quality, professional development
and patient experience. They meet reg-
ularly and examine patient satisfaction
scores; allowing nurses to identify both
successes and areas of improvement.
They also perform daily patient rounds
and inquire about patient experience
in real-time so they can proactively
improve on areas that fall short.
In addition to providing real-time
recognition for a job performed well,
several initiatives keep the nurses
motivated. These include unit-based
roundtables during which nurses
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 27
resolve a variety of issues, and popular
monthly lunches, hosted by Morris for
30 to 40 nurses at a time. The lunches
allow nurses to relax, speak openly and
ask questions, which has fostered an
open exchange of accurate, relevant
information. “By caring for our nurses
and giving them a voice, they in turn
take excellent care of our patients, and
do whatever it takes to give them what
they need,” says Morris.
Because patient needs are as varied
as the patients themselves, Nebraska
Medicine has reached beyond the provi-
sion of traditional comfort services to
include less conventional services as
well. Pet therapy, offered twice a week,
allows patients who miss their four-
legged friends an opportunity to have
moments of comfort and joy, which
helps with their healing process. And
to improve the comfort and ease of its
many international patients, Nebraska
Medicine offers a 24/7 languages sup-
port in 165 languages.
What happens behind the scenes at
Nebraska Medicine is also critical to ena-
bling the provision of extraordinary care.
Wayne Howell, Sodexo Resident District
Manager, and Sodexo Operations Man-
ager Randy Peacock, oversee a team of
22 that ensures that all hospital equip-
ment, from electronic thermometers to
MRI machines and wheelchairs to sur-
gery beds, functions properly. “We see
ourselves as the safeguards of the hos-
pital’s operations, and our priority is to
Inside the kitchen,
a Sodexo staff
member prepares
a healthy meal for
patients.
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 28
Life Size
get the repaired equipment back into
circulation as quickly and effectively as
possible. This is how we can best help the
clinical staff do their jobs,” Howell says.
His department not only maintains and
repairs, it is also involved with equip-
ment assessments and purchasing, and
works closely with the clinical staff to
understand their needs.
Environmental Services at Nebra­
ska Medicine, “are all about main-
taining high cleaning standards and
providing outstanding hospitality,”
says Paul Turner, Sodexo Resident
District Manager, Healthcare Services.
In addition to monitoring performance
via patient questionnaires and real-
time interviews (3,500 every month),
Sodexo implements innovative clean-
ing techniques to ensure continuous
improvement. The Xenex robot uses
powerful pulsations of non-toxic UV
light to effectively destroy germs and
bacteria in five minutes. All 265 mem-
bers of the cleaning team are Sodexo-
trained and certified, a process that
takes six to 12 months. “Improving
Quality of Life in a hospital promotes
healing,” says Turner. “By making sure
that Nebraska Medicine is the clean-
est hospital in the area, we are doing
just that.”
3,500 patients interviewed
every month to monitor
performance.
University of
Nebraska Medical
Center medical
students make
patient rounds with
Dr. Wendy J. Grant.
“The medical
school creates
an atmosphere
where students can be very
successful in learning to care for
patients. We follow an Integrative
Clinical Experience Program
throughout all four years of
training. It teaches us that caring
for patients means building
relationships, and learning how
to relate on all levels—clinical,
emotional, social and
psychological. It’s about
understanding the patient and
their whole environment in order
to treat them effectively. This has
been invaluable to me and I have
seen how it helps to heal patients.”
Whitney Bossert, 4th year Medical
Student at University of Nebraska
Medical Center
29
Even if every worker within a hospital has a critical role to play,
transporters can sometimes be an overlooked source of quality patient care.
But with the right training, tools and organization, they have the power
to change the patient experience during a hospital stay. They can also
allow medical staff to focus more closely on clinical responsibilities, becoming
a source of improved efficiency for hospitals as well.
Improving the
patient experience
through
transport services
30Healthcare FACILITIES International review
User Guide
Transport Services
Capitalizing on the critical
role of transporters
Transporters move nearly everything within a hospital—from transporting patients
to delivering specimens, equipment and documents. While their role is largely logistical,
they play an integral role in shaping the patient’s impression of a hospital. Sodexo pinpointed
a way to improve the efficiency of transport services while ensuring that each specialist
contributes to improving the Quality of Life of patients and staff alike.
A uniformed system strengthens
multi-tasking capabilities
Sodexo’s role: All hospital transporters are unified into a single
team. As this centralization requires transporters to be capable of
any task at any time, the skillsets of individual transporters are
raised across the board. Sodexo’s transport services can be
tailored to meet the needs of any hospital—whether training and
managing a hospital’s own team of transporters or providing
Sodexo staff.
The benefits: Transporters now have the training and capabilities
to respond to the needs of the emergency room, operating suite
or diagnostic imaging. The amount of downtime between tasks is
reduced as these multi-functional transporters can respond to the
needs of any busy department.
A highly trained team ensures
patient safety and comfort
Sodexo’s role: A selection of transporters are trained to take on
specialized tasks. While some obtain advanced life support
qualifications, others learn disease prevention techniques to limit
the spread of hospital-acquired infections. When moving patients
between departments, transporters are also trained to identify
signs of distress.
The benefits: The ability to handle certain clinical elements
allows transporters to take on tasks that were previously handled
by nurses. For example, trained transporters can accompany
patients with more serious medical conditions to MRI
appointments and be responsible for their well-being during
exams. This shift in responsibility frees up the time of clinical staff
to spend more time with patients and focus on other more vital
aspects of patient care.
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 31
A human touch sets patients at ease
Sodexo’s role: The “high-touch” approach to patient transport
means that transporters do much more than simply deliver
patients to their appointments. As patients tend to be anxious
in the unfamiliar hospital environment and can feel uneasy in
their hospital gowns in public areas, each trip to an exam or
surgery, which takes an average of 18 to 25 minutes, presents
a crucial opportunity to improve the patient experience.
The benefits: With the right training, transporters themselves
can capitalize on the time they spend with patients and
become key players in their care. In creating bonds with
patients, they set them at ease, lower anxiety, increase their
comfort level and help to preserve their dignity.
Advanced technology reduces wait times
and raises efficiency
Sodexo’s role: The use of a transport software application
streamlines the logistical aspects of patient care. Once medical
staff logs requests into the application, transporters can self-assign
tasks. Completed items are logged into the system and transporters
are automatically assigned their next task based on where they are
in the hospital via an iPhone or iPad.
The benefits: These real-time updates inform transporters when
nearby patients are ready for pickup, thus reducing wait times and
inefficient trips across the hospital. The software application can
also be configured to track equipment – ensuring that a device is
exactly where it should be and minimizing the time that
unnecessary rental equipment remains in hospitals.
+20%improvement in service
response time was also
recorded in these hospitals.
+25%higher productivity rates were
experienced in US hospitals that
use Sodexo transport services.
Sodexo
newsaround the world
At Sodexo, we believe that improving
Quality of Life leads to the progress of individuals and
contributes to the performance of organizations.
In addition to the range of services we provide
to hospitals and senior care facilities,
Sodexo teams work to ensure the well-being of
individuals in companies, schools and universities,
military bases, prisons, remote environments
such as oil and gas platforms, as well as mines.
Through over 100 different services, Sodexo improves
the Quality of Life of 75 million people around
the world every day.
Read about some of the latest Sodexo news
around the world.
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 33
Sodexo has secured two contracts with
samsung in the middle east and asia.
Improving
the Quality of Life
of Samsung teams
SODEXO IS IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF
LIFE OF THE SAMSUNG ENGINEERING
TEAMS in Ruwais, Abu Dhabi, who are
constructing an oil and carbon black
processing plant. When this refinery
opens at the end of 2015, it will
produce 40,000 tons of carbon black
pigment a year and 30,000 barrels of
crude oil per day. Sodexo services
include catering, housekeeping,
laundry, pest control, camp
management, corrective maintenance
and the management of recreational
facilities.
In a very different contract, Samsung
Electronics turned to Sodexo for
a corporate Benefits and Rewards
service in Indonesia. The campaign
focuses on incentivizing sales people
working at independent, multi-branded
retailers. The aim is to encourage
sales of Samsung, without using
a cash incentive. Sodexo has met
this need by providing Gift Pass
Vouchers, which in Indonesia can
be used to buy basic commodities
such as rice, milk and other groceries,
along with items such as children’s
books. Based on this, the offer
has been extended to Samsung’s
own branded stores to incentivize sales
of specific models.
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 34
The ability to influence the way
companies behave by posting
comments on social media and
e-commerce sites has created a
new form of public accountability,
according to the Sodexo 2015
Workplace Trends Report. Online
reviews by workers and consumers
have given rise to a new
“Rateocracy” that demands real-
time management of companies’
reputations. So in an era when
$3.6 trillion worth of retail sales are
directly influenced by online ratings,
CEOs need to offer an honest and
inspirational vision that connects
employees and consumers.
Sodexo’s Workplace
Trends Report shows
the rise of
“Rateocracy”
Serving up a better
Quality of Life
in FRENCH middle
schoolS
Sodexo services now improve
the Quality of Life of 10,000 French
middle schools students.
Under a four-year contract, Sodexo teams
will prepare daily meals on-site
and will also provide cleaning and
maintenance services.
Supporting
China’s leading
retail giant
China and the world of online retail
are two markets with a big
reputation for growth: put them
together and you have Vipshop
(VIP.com) – a new Sodexo customer
for food services. Vipshop is
China’s leading flash sale website
for discounted branded products.
Discover the Sodexo
Workplace Trends
Report 2015.
35
Ensuring
the well-being of
French troops
Sodexo helps French Armed Forces deliver
a facilities project in the South Pacific.
To support a modernization program on the French Poly-
nesian atoll of Moruroa, France’s Ministry of Defense has
turned to Sodexo for a comprehensive Remote Sites con-
tract. Sodexo’s experience with French forces overseas and
its expertise in challenging environments played a key in
the selection process for the three-year TELSITE project.
Sodexo will oversee the construction, transportation
and installation of the camp. To ensure the well-being
of on-site personnel, Sodexo will provide food services
from local suppliers and will set up and run sports and
welfare facilities.
Leading the waY
in facilities
management
36
Sodexo’s global facilities management offer gets
a nod from the Institute of Asset Management
Sodexo has become the first outsourcing com-
pany to receive the prestigious Asset Manage-
ment Achievement Award from the Institute of
Asset Management. This recognition reflects
the fact that Sodexo is the only facility manage-
ment provider to offer global services in a wide
range of industries, and is able to deploy best
practices across all its sites.
Healthcare FACILITIES International review 37
Partnering
to REDUCE
crime in the uk
Sodexo and crime
reduction charity
Nacro have won six
regional probation
contracts in England
and Wales. Together,
the two organizations
will manage probation
services for low to
medium-risk offenders
for a seven-year
period. Sodexo Justice
Services have been
working with the UK
government to protect
the public and
rehabilitate offenders
since 1993.
setting
the standard in
sustainability
For the eighth consecutive year, the RobecoSAM
Sustainability Yearbook ranked Sodexo as its Industry Leader
for economic, social and environmental performance.
In the 2015 edition, Sodexo is once again the only company
in its industry to achieve the “Gold” Status Class.
An enriched
Quality of Life offer
Sodexo has always sought out
ways to enrich its and global
incentive and recognition offers.
In November 2014, the Group
did just that with the acquisition of
Motivcom plc, a leading corporate
benefits and rewards provider
in the UK.
The Quality of Life Experiences
magazine is available ON LINE
on sodexo.com/healthcare
in this issue
“Maintaining excellent Quality of Life
at the hospital is the result of strong,
continuous teamwork and a commitment
to individual and collective well-being.”
Rosanna Morris, Chief Nursing Officer at Nebraska Medicine
and interim CEO of Nebraska Medicine
Explore the daily life of staff, patients and medical students
at Nebraska Medicine in the Life Size section, p. 18.
The brain is a non-stop
learning machine. As we age,
it doesn’t get weaker, on the
contrary it simply knows more.
Read more about the Myth of Cognitive
Decline in the Aging Well section, p. 14.
20%improvement
in service response
time was achieved
by hospitals
using Sodexo’s
transport
services
Discover how transport services foster better
patient care and more efficient management
in the User Guide section, p. 29.
What if undergoing surgery
without actually going under
led to a faster recovery?
Hear what two Belgian
anesthesiologists have to say
on the subject.
See how medical hypnosis is improving
the Quality of Life of patients in
the Meet the Experts section, p. 18.
60%of hosital
managers
deal with
intergenerational
tension between
staff members
Read more about the multi-generational
workforce in today’s hospitals in
the Issues and Topics section, p. 10.

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Quality of life experiences no.4

  • 1. Exceeding Expectations at Nebraska Medicine in the U.S. Living out the golden years in an engaging environment Relying on the power of medical hypnosis with Dr. Fabienne Roelants and Dr. Christine Watremez Healthcare facilities international review No. 04
  • 2. 14 2 Editorial Committee: Patrick Boulier (Latin America) - Patrick Connolly (USA); Willy Gautier (France); Simon Scrivens (UK) - Stuart Winters (Asia Australia). Editor-in-chief:SophieDelaval. Editorialcoordination:KashaKruse. Research, copy, design and layout: . Journalists: Trevor Huggins, Lori Tomonari, Victoria Nagel Hauzy. Photo credits: Bea Uhart/CAPA Pictures (p. 2-7); DR/B. Lara Arrambide, DR/B. Clipper, DR/J. Ogunkeye, DR/B. Pauget, DR/C. Chevillard, DR/C. Brooks, DR/M. Klaffke (p. 10-13); Jessica Chou/CAPA Pictures (p. 14-17); Ryan Donnell (p. 18-30); Grundini (p. 31-33); Samsung Electronics Switzerland (p. 33); iStock 2015 (p. 34); ECPAF/France/2013/Jérôme Salles (p. 35); Sodexo photo library (p. 36-37). Clinical anesthesiologists Dr. Fabienne Roelants and Dr. Christine Watremez explain why and how medical hypnosis helps to improve the quality of a patient’s experience before, during and after surgery. Explore this issue further in the Meet the Experts section. Dr. Brad Britigan, President of Nebraska Medicine and Dean of University of Nebraska Medical Center’s College of Medicine, Dr. Alan Langnas, Director of Liver Transplantation and Dr. Phil Smith, Medical Director of the Biocontainment Unit, Nebraska Medicine explain how this facility raised the bar on patient care and safety in the Life Size section. Dr. Betsabé Lara Arrambide, Mexican doctor, Centro Médico Sabinas; John Ogunkeye, American CFO, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education; Bonnie Clipper, American author and Chief Nursing Officer, Medical Center of the Rockies; Dr. Bertrand Pauget, French Research Professor of Management, European Business School of Paris; Christiane Chevillard, French Project Manager, National Association for the Education of Hospital Staff, and Christopher Brooks, British Senior Policy Manager for Consumer and Community, Age UK, examine the multi-generational workforce from all angles in the Issues and Topics section. Carissa Kelly, Director of Lifestyle and Activities, The Terraces of Phoenix, Richard Nix, Sodexo Director of Dining Services, The Terraces of Phoenix, and Michael Ramscar, Clinical Researcher with the Linguistics Department of the University of Tübingen, Germany, share what it means to age successfully in the Aging Well section. Peggy Theile, Sodexo Senior Brand Manager of Patient Transport, explains how a unified approach to transport services fosters a more caring environment for patients as well as greater continuity and efficiency in the User Guide section. “Hypnosis can be quite empowering as it enables the patient to become a main actor in the overall care process.” Contributors
  • 3. Exceeding Expectations AT Nebraska Medicine in the U.S. 18 Healthcare FACILITIES International review 1 Contents 02 Meet the Experts Perfecting the art of medical hypnosis as an alternative to traditional anesthesia. 08 Quality of Life Trends and Figures Key learnings from Sodexo’s International Leaders' Survey. 10  Quality of Life Issues and Topics Addressing the challenges and opportunities created by the multi-generational workforce in hospitals. 14 Aging Well Improving Quality of Life as we age means focusing on growing and not just growing older. 18 Life Size Going above and beyond the expected at Nebraska Medicine. 29 User Guide Revamping transport services to improve patient care and hospital efficiency. 32 Sodexo News Around the World A review of Sodexo’s recent initiatives and partnerships that improve Quality of Life.
  • 5. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 3 Meet the Experts In response to patients’ requests for alternatives to traditional anesthesia, anesthesiologists at the Saint-Luc University Hospital in Brussels, Belgium, have perfected the art of medical hypnosis with surprisingly beneficial effects on both the body and the mind. Dr. Fabienne Roelants and Dr. Christine Watremez MEDICAL HYPNOSISPOWERFUL ON THE MIND, GENTLE ON THE BODY bio Clinical anesthesiologists Dr. Fabienne Roelants and Dr. Christine Watremez helped develop the use of hypnosis in the operating theater at the Saint-Luc University Hospital in Brussels. Throughout their careers, they have participated in many international conferences and written countless articles on the benefits of hypnosis.
  • 6. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 4 Meet the Experts Dr. Fabienne Roelants and Dr. Christine Watremez, both clinical anesthesiologists trained in medical hypnosis, explain why and how this innovative technique helps improve the quality of a patient’s experience before, during and after surgery. Dr. Fabienne Roelants, Clinical anesthesiologist at the Saint-Luc University Hospital in Brussels
  • 7. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 5 When surgery was recommended for a breast cancer patient at Saint-Luc University Hospital, the patient requested that it be done under medical hypnosis, as she had previously experienced severe nausea from general anesthesia. While she responded and recovered extremely well, a full mastectomy was recommended when the cancer unfortunately returned. Once again, she requested surgery under hypnosis. After this second, far more difficult operation was over, the patient had a surprisingly optimistic impression of the entire process. How do you explain this patient’s incredibly positive reaction to an operation that would typically leave many women devastated? — Dr. Fabienne Roelants: Medical hypnosis calls upon certain resources from within the patient that enable him or her to attain a natural state of modified consciousness, generally by reliving a pleasant memory or experience. Because this particular patient’s life had been very difficult—she had no real positive memories to speak of—the hypnosis allowed her to experience something completely new. By using her imagination, she was able to leave the rest of her life behind for a while and escape. Her mastectomy became secondary in importance to her experience under hypnosis. So how does medical hypnosis work? — Dr. Christine Watremez: First of all, the surgeons identify patients that are particularly receptive to the concept of hypnosis. We then conduct a general medical exam and ensure that they understand the hypnotic process. We ask the patient to think about a pleasant memory. Then, at the time of the operation, by using specific words and speaking in a particular tone of voice, and by focusing on certain parts “Hypnosis can be quite empowering as it enables the patient to become a main actor in the overall care process.”
  • 8. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 6 Meet the Experts of the body, we help them relive their memory and arrive at this desired modified state. Our role is to accompany and monitor the patient very closely. If the operation becomes more complicated and hypnosis is no longer appropriate, we administer general anesthesia with the patient’s approval. What is the draw of hypnosis? — F.R.: Today, many patients are looking for a more natural, and less medicated approach to their care. Some patients have also had negative experiences with general anesthesia in the past and fear these experiences will be repeated. Are certain surgical interventions more successful than others? — C.W.: The success of medical hypnosis depends on the patient as well as the type of procedure. For hypnosis to work, the patient’s cooperation and motivation are essen- tial, as is their trust in us. Furthermore, it’s not for every type of surgery. Studies and our own personal experience show that hypnosis is very successful for certain surface procedures, such as thyroid interventions, breast cancer, plastic and reconstructive surgeries, hernias, vascular issues, colonoscopies and in-vitro fertilization (IVF). What are the risks and main benefits? — F.R.: So far we have only observed benefits. Compared to general anesthesia, patients experience less post-operative pain, fatigue, nausea and vomiting. They need less pain medication, they recover faster, and, as a result, spend less time in the hospital. In addition, scarring tends to be minimized. As for IVF, there are more successful pregnancies when medical hypnosis is used than when it is not used. How does hypnosis improve the patient’s overall Quality of Life? — C.W.: While hypnosis offers numerous physical benefits, it can also be quite empowering as it enables the patient to become a main actor in the overall care process. Hypnosis also provides a positive experience that patients can call upon later in their lives. We teach patients a technique and they can, to a certain degree, induce this state of modified con- sciousness themselves during life’s more stressful moments. “We develop a deeper relationship with the patient that gives us all a new perspective on our profession that is more open-minded.”
  • 9. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 7 What is your relationship with the surgeon and the nurses when medical hypnosis is involved? — F.R.: For the comfort and well-being of the patient, it is criti- cal that we get along well with the surgeon and the nurses in the operating theater. We work side by side in a calm, precise, collaborative manner. As we have an active role through the entire surgery, we work very closely with the surgeons, who consult with us before each important decision. What impact does this technique have on the medical team? — C.W.: A very human exchange takes place in the operating theater. We develop a deeper relationship with the patient that gives us all a new more human and open-minded perspective on our profession. This collaborative approach tends to impact our interactions and relations with other colleagues, creating a more harmonious overall work environment. Contact Dr. Fabienne Roelants and Dr. Christine Watremez at fabienne.roelants@uclouvain.be and christine.watremez@uclouvain.be Watch a medical team at Saint- Luc University conduct a surgery under hypnosis. This report from Euronews Science by the Associated Press was filmed in 2011. Watch the video interview on the Quality of Life Observer. Dr. Christine Watremez, Clinical anesthesiologist at the Saint-Luc University Hospital in Brussels
  • 10. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 8 Quality of Life Trends and Figures Leaders in hospital recognize Quality of Life as a strategic priority today and for the future *The Sodexo Institute for Quality of Life gathers and develops insight on the drivers of Quality of Life and their impact on performance. FOCUS ON QUALITY OF LIFE: A TOP PRIORITY FOR HEALTHCARE DECISION-MAKERS The Sodexo Institute for Quality of Life* conducted the first international survey dedicated to Quality of Life as a factor of performance. The study was conducted among 780 top leaders and key decision makers from three different sectors (Corporate, Healthcare and Universities) across six countries (United States, United Kingdom, France, Brazil, India and China). Discover the responses from leaders in today’s hospitals. Quality of Life is already in action Quality of Life initiatives implemented in healthcare facilities concern the following key areas: Out of all the leaders from hospitals surveyed: 91% Physical environment Everything that contributes to a patient’s safety and comfort—including room furniture and equipment, spaces with low noise levels, optimal temperatures, facility maintenance and comfortable visiting areas. 86% Health and nutrition All aspects that support patient well-being, from tasty and nutritious meals to on-site physical activities. 81% Ease and efficiency Factors—such as reduced waiting time, flexible meal hours, streamlined patient transport—that impact a patient’s ability to carryout activities smoothly with minimal interruptions. 72% Social interactions Various components that help to strengthen bonds among patients and their families, such as access to welcoming group activities and on-site entertainment and events. 56% have a dedicated budget 76% have a dedicated program that increases staff awareness of the importance of Quality of Life The political pressure of new laws and regulations as well as the increasing demands of patients drives leaders to focus on Quality of Life. 79%view Quality of Life improvement as a growing future challenge 90%of leaders from hospitals “totally agree” that they place a high level of importance on improving Quality of Life in their organization.
  • 11. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 9 Log on to the Qualityoflifeobserver.com and discover: An overview and datawall of complete study results and a downloadable study abstract Take the quiz to compare your organization’s Quality of Life performance with other top organizations in the healthcare sector Source: Sodexo Quality of Life International Leaders’ Survey, conducted by international market research firm Harris Interactive, 2015. 60% OF LEADERS IN HOSPITALS IDENTIFIED THE LINK BETWEEN QUALITY OF LIFE AND PERFORMANCE Patient satisfaction Image and reputation Staff efficiency Business and economic performance Quality of care 1 2 3 4 5 + The Quality of Life initiatives often involve several leaders, which reflects the level of importance healthcare organizations place on this issue. QUALITY OF LIFE IS A PRIORITY throughoutthehealthcarefacility Leaders are aware that investing in Quality of Life is not just a question of budget. While cost was the most cited obstacle (58%), leaders also identified challenges such as: What challenges remaiN? patient care manager top quality manager medical officer nursing officer people in charge of quality of life in hospital Hospital CEO hospital coo Professionalizing practices Better implementing programs Enabling a cultural transformation in their organization Want to learn more about this study? For these leaders, a focus on Quality of Life improves performance in the following areas:
  • 12. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 10 Quality of Life Issues and Topics In today’s hospitals, three generations of nurses, doctors and staff currently work side-by-side. With this mix of ages also comes varied expectations and working styles. These differences can either create tension or can produce opportunities. As the multi-generational workforce is present across all cultures and continents, experts from around the globe offer insight on how to make the most of what each generation has to offer. Gen X born 1963-1980 Many Gen Xers witnessed widespread corporate downsizing throughout their careers. They are often highly independent and also seek a mix of advanced career options and a balance between their personal and professional lives. Gen Y born 1980-2000 Having grown up surrounded by technology, Gen Yers are used to “instant” communication and response. They are optimistic, inclusive and seek answers. They enjoy group work and have an entrepreneurial spirit. Baby Boomers born 1946-1963 Occupying a high number of leadership positions, Boomers are considered to be dedicated and loyal workers. At the same time they are known to be competitive and like to challenge the rules. Source: Generational Differences in the Workplace: Personal Values, Behaviors, and Popular Beliefs, Journal of Diversity Management, 2009. Managing staff across the ages at the hospital
  • 13. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 11 AN ONLINE MULTI-GENERATIONAL RESOURCE HUB Based on interviews conducted with French hospital managers, the ANFH developed an online informational resources platform on the multi-generational workforce. This tool provides key insights on how to unite intergenerational teams while respecting the differences of each generation. ANFH hospital managers can deepen their understanding of the issues through testimonials, case studies, articles and best practices shared on this online information hub. This resource has also since been used to create regional training programs. 60%of hospital managers deal with intergenerational tension between staff members Christiane Chevillard, Project Manager, National Association for the training of Hospital Staff (ANFH), France. Understanding what makes generations different Bonnie Clipper, Chief Nursing Officer, Medical Center of the Rockies, and author of The Nurse Manager’s Guide to an Intergenerational Workforce, 2012, USA. “It is crucial for nursing managers to take the time to learn what is important to each generation. Successful management hinges on our ability to reduce generational conflict, promote engagement and take advantage of what these differences bring to the table. Without overgeneralizing, we must find what works for each age group. For example, Xers tend to value their independence and seek a healthy work-life balance, while Gen Y favors group activities and feedback. Given this assessment, we can maximize Gen Y’s engagement by avoiding micromanagement styles and involving them in decision- making processes and leadership opportunities. It is also crucial to recognize that these differences cannot simply be attributed to one’s age. In this past decade for example, the sheer size of Gen Y has made the college acceptance process extremely competitive. Growing up surrounded by this type of rivalry, the competitive spirit comes rather naturally to Gen Y —particularly when compared to Xers who come from a much smaller generation. Acquisition and management of quality employees is the most important issue we as managers face. As such, we must focus on building our understanding of generational differences and why these differences exist.” “We must find what works for each age group and customize communication and leadership styles to allow each generation to be successful and fulfilled in the workplace.” Source: Managing an Intergerational Workforce: strategies for Health Care Transformation, American Hospital Association, 2014.
  • 14. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 12 Quality of Life Issues and Topics 50%or more of younger employees are dismissive oF their older colleagues’ abilities Dr. Bertrand Pauget, Research Professor of Management, European Business School of Paris, France. He co-conducted a study with Dr. Ahmed Dammak between 2011 and 2013 exploring managers’ perceptions of Generation Y. “The debate over the generations needs to shift: WE NEED TO FOCUS ON making organizations evolve rather than solving the problem of a single generation.” What are some takeaways from your survey on perceptions of Gen Y in the healthcare industry? — The notion of generations refers to people of the same age group who share the same codes, practices and place within a society. Each has been similarly “shaped” by the historical events of their time. My study reveals that older generations tend to view Gen Y as one that struggles with conventional hierarchy and instead places a great deal of value on individual abilities; demands for better work-life balance; lacks dedication; and is by nature hyperconnected. But these generalizations are somewhat unfair. If you think about it, older generations had some of the same expectations—they are simply more visible today. For example, technology creates the need to set boundaries that weren’t needed before. Previous generations were able to completely detach from work once they left. Today, work responsibilities are ever-present with the arrival of smartphones. Gen Y is simply the first generation that has had to set these limits. Why is it that Gen Y in particular faces such heavy criticism? — The massive wave of Gen Y, which is much larger than Gen X, entered the workforce in mid-2000, at the same time that the first boomers began to hit retirement age. The reputation they developed among older colleagues for shunning authority or not investing themselves enough in their work has more to do with the fact that their arrival simply threw off the balance of the workforce. What do these perceptions of Gen Y reveal about the workforce in general? — The criticisms facing Gen Y reveal a deeper problem. The arrival of younger workers highlights the difficulties institutions face in revamping practices and adapting to changing expectations. Instead of thinking in terms of age, organizations would benefit from cross-generational processes focused on motivating the entire workforce and increasing performance. Are we too quick to judge Generation Y? Source: Managing Human Behavior in Public and Nonprofit Organizations, Robert B. Denhardt, Janet V. Denhardt, Maria P. Aristigueta, 2013.
  • 15. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 13 “A NEW NORMAL IS BEING DEFINED BY THE CHANGing SYSTEM AND THE OUTLOOK OF NEW GENERATIONS.” Christopher Brooks, Senior Policy Manager for Consumer and Community at Age UK*, United Kingdom. * Age UK is the country’s largest charity dedicated to inspiring, enabling and supporting older people. The inherent expectation of a Boomer doctor is to work 15 hours a day—that’s just the way it’s always been done. But Gen X and Y are looking for moderation and using every tool at their disposal to work faster and more efficiently. These expectations align with the changing times. “Today’s doctors aren’t paid based on the number of patients they see, but rather the quality of service they provide,” says Ogunkeye. “So it’s not about how long we work, but how smart we work.” Given the large age gap between Boomers and Gen Y, a mentor- mentee relationship somewhat naturally occurs. “What I like most about Boomer doctors is the incredibly vast amount of information they hold,” says Dr. Betsabé Lara Arrambide, a 25-year-old doctor in Mexico. “My generation has benefitted from technology—we have everything we’ve ever learned at our fingertips on our cell phones—but we have become quite reliant on it.” Boomers on the other hand, who studied volumes of textbooks, have always internalized their knowledge. “They learned the old-school way,” says Dr. Arrambide. “And it’s pretty amazing that they always have the answer.” THE KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER FROM BOOMERS TO GEN Y Dr. Betsabé Lara Arrambide, Centro Médico Sabinas, Mexico. KEEPING EXPERTISE IN THE WORKFORCE “We see quite often that older employees are choosing to wind down slowly into retirement by working shorter days or fewer days a week. Flexible work in general, including voluntarily switching to part-time work, is on an upward trend and is likely to continue through the years. This increased flexibility, if implemented properly, can be beneficial for everyone involved. For older employees, it can be easier to gradually transition into retirement rather than to suddenly stop working. But it makes a lot of sense for organizations as well. Healthcare facilities can retain the career-long expertise of this generation in the labor market for a longer period of time. In addition, both younger and older employees benefit from the transfer of skills—which goes both ways.” John Ogunkeye, CFO, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, USA.
  • 16. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 14 Aging Well T he Terraces of Phoenix is one of 43 senior communi- ties managed by American Baptist Homes of the West, a charitable organization dedicated to helping seniors stay engaged and live life to the fullest. Originally founded as Orangewood in 1959, The Terraces of Phoenix is a senior community where residents really want to be, thanks to its partnership with Masterpiece Liv- ing. This program promotes success- ful aging through ideas and tools that educate, train, coach and track success. Focusing on the mind, body and soul “Masterpiece Living embodies our belief in maximizing residents’ potential, no matter their limitation,” explains Carissa Kelly, Director of Lifestyle and Activities at The Terraces of Phoenix. “Every staff member has a different job but our roles are the same. We are com- mitted to encouraging and empowering our residents to take ownership of their aging experience.” Masterpiece Living helps create the kind of environment in which all residents can continue to grow and develop. The four pillar approach Home to 323 people between the ages of 70 and over 100, The Terraces of Phoenix is organized into four different levels of living: independent, assisted, memory support and the health center. The 50 recurring activities, offered multiple times a week, or on a weekly, bi-weekly or monthly basis, are tailored and adapted to each differ- ent level. They are designed to provide residents with a spiritual, intellectual, social and physical balance—what Masterpiece Living calls its four-pillar approach to successful aging. Never a dull moment An integral part of the Masterpiece Liv- ing approach is Mindful, a mind-body- spirit program that works the brain and keeps the body healthy. Other spiritu- ally focused activities include round- table discussions on topics such as “How Happiness Thinks” and “Chicken Soup for the Soul,” guided meditations, Tai Chi, and a chorale group called Sing and Be Happy. These activities uplift the spirit, and provide residents with a sense of purpose and an opportu- nity to connect with something big- ger than themselves. Food for Thought, held twice a month, is a small current Residents enjoy participating in dinnertime debates with guest speakers (top right). Following the discussion, they observe live cooking demonstrations with Sodexo’s Chef Stephen Love (bottom right). It’s never too late to learn and growat the terraces of Phoenix “Right where you want to be” is the signature tagline for the senior living community in Arizona, that operates on the belief that helping residents continue to grow contributes to their successful aging.
  • 18. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 16 Aging Well events discussion group held over din- ner. It was introduced when The Ter- races of Phoenix learned that their residents’ greatest preoccupation is the current state of the world. This event allows them to articulate their opinions, learn from and listen to oth- ers, exchange ideas and information, and build confidence. a wide selection of top quality classes “Studies show that greater involvement, and more connections and physical movement result in a better immune system, longer life and an overall higher sense of well-being,” says Kelly. Based on this research, The Terraces of Phoenix recently launched Terraces University, an on-site innovative program providing continuing education. While receiving credits, residents can choose from a wide selection of top-quality classes based on the same four-pillar approach. Everything from practical economics to religious studies, computer literacy and physical fitness are part of the curriculum. Additional seasonal out- ings, parties, speakers, entertainers and workshops complete the busy calendar and encourage residents to continue to build meaningful connections and make new friends. the big picture Kelly sums up Masterpiece Living at The Terraces of Phoenix in a way that speaks as much to society at large as it does to the individual. “Residents come here to live the best years of their lives and to be really engaged. In providing them with this kind of environment we aim to change the public’s perception of aging. We keep the bar high to let our residents know that we believe in them and in their capacity to age successfully.” Celebrating birthdays at the Terraces of Phoenix is a joyous occasion for everyone. “Dining is an integral part of life here and often sets the tone for the rest of the day. Our Chef Stage Center program features Executive Chef Stephen Love and our registered Sodexo dietician, Lauren Richardson, in a live cooking demonstration. We focus on nutritious, flavorful meals, including gluten-free, vegetarian and sustainably grown options that align with the successful aging physical component we encourage. Drinks with Richard is a twice-monthly happy hour for cocktails, appetizers and conversation. Grille at the Terraces is a reservations-only, multi-course gourmet meal complete with paired wines, live piano playing, and tuxedo-suited waiters. We believe that meals should be a time to enjoy good food and good company in a supportive and stimulating atmosphere that feels like home.” Richard Nix, Sodexo Director of Dining Services, The Terraces of Phoenix
  • 19. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 17 Our brain is a non-stop learn- ing machine. We absorb new infor- mation all the time. The healthy aging brain, like the younger brain, continues to accumulate knowledge. For every action there is an equal and oppo- site reaction. Whenever our brain learns a skill in one area, it does so by slightly turning down skills in other areas. We cannot go through life continuously learning and maintain the same rate or accuracy with which we access a memory. Some things are going to get harder as we get older. That’s the price we pay for knowing more. Talk about brain atrophy is seriously overblown. When comparing the non-diseased brains of a healthy 20-year-old and a healthy 70-year-old, there is no significant difference between them in terms of the number of brain neurons. The main neural changes are a reduction of grey matter and a reorganization of white matter. This is the consequence of learning, and is to be expected. The Myth of Cognitive Decline by Dr. Michael Ramscar 5 things to know about bio Dr. Michael Ramscar is a Clinical Researcher with the Linguistics Department at the University of Tübingen, in Germany. His research on the learning capacity of a healthy brain throughout a lifetime has led to a new appreciation of the accumulation of knowledge in aging adults. Your brain is part of your body, so keeping your heart healthy keeps your brain healthy. In fact, vascular health is an overwhelming predictor of brain health. The more peo- ple realize that everything in their body is interconnected, the more motivation they will have to care for their bodies, which of course, in turn will help them care for their minds. It’s very difficult to meas- ure how much we learn because the statistics of human experience are skewed. Our intuitive thinking about memory tends to ignore that each of us is over-specialized in some things and knows nothing about other things, just as it tends to ignore the permanent state of learning that exists in all healthy brains. How and what we learn is far more complex than what we can intuitively grasp. “The brains of older people do not get weak. On the contrary, they simply know more.”2 4 3 5 1
  • 20. Surgeons in the operating room of Nebraska Medicine.
  • 21. 19 Life Size Nebraska Medicine Going above and beyond expectations in patient care Known for its top quality, innovative and highly specialized clinical care, Nebraska Medicine is also a home away from home where patients find themselves in a warm, embracing community that puts them at the center of every step of their treatment and healing process.
  • 22. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 20 Life Size D r. Rick S. and journal- ist Ashoka M. were both seriously ill with the Ebola virus when they arrived at Nebraska Medicine’s Biocontainment Unit in the fall of 2014. They received about two and a half weeks of intensive care with medical staff in the room at all times, and the support of a large multi-disciplinary team that included a virologist, a psychologist and a social worker. Following treatment, they fully recovered and returned to Africa earlier this year. This type of specialized personal- ized 24/7 care for Ebola patients is not available just anywhere. Nebraska Medicine’s Biocontainment Unit is one of only three in the U.S. In 2004, when Nebraska Medicine appropriated an unused pediatric transplant ward equipped with its own air-handling system and five bubble-like rooms, for Dr. Phil Smith, Medical Director of the Biocontainment Unit, it was “a dream come true.” The walls and ceilings were rendered impervious to bacteria; the unit’s airflow system was re-engineered to enable continuous, fail-safe air purifying exchanges, and a specially designed two-door auto- clave was installed. Crossing between “clean” and “dirty” zones of the Biocontain- ment Unit requires donning and doff- ing head-to-toe Personal Protection “The actions of our team far exceed what’s expected of them. Our nurses build strong, meaningful relationships with the patients.” Kate Boulter, Lead Clinical Nurse at the Biocontainment Unit Kate Boulter, Lead Clinical Nurse makes patient safety and well-being a top priority in the Biocontainment Unit.
  • 23. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 21 “Nebraska Medicine provides the highest quality of medical care with a focus on optimizing the experience of the patients and their families. This is the meaning of “Serious Medicine, Extraordinary Care,” our tagline and modus operandi. Our mission is to provide a breadth and depth of medical services in tertiary and quaternary care balanced with a patient-centric approach that considers the whole patient and family and speaks to the more humanistic component of caring. As partners with Nebraska’s only public medical school and teaching hospital, it is also our mission to train the state’s next generation of care providers in the importance of understanding this critical balance.” Dr. Brad Britigan, Nebraska Medicine Interim President and Dean of UNMC’s College of Medicine Equipment (PPE). “Mutual trust is essential to the performance of our team, with the doffer playing one of the most important roles,” says Dr. Smith. Ensuring safety is not the only critical aspect of Ebola care. Equally important is meeting the patient’s socio-psychological needs. “The actions of our team far exceed what’s expected of them,” says Kate Boulter, Lead Clinical Nurse at the Biocontainment Unit. “They build strong, meaningful relationships with the patients, which helps to improve the overall quality of their lives while they are with us.” One nurse learned how to play chess; another arrived one day with home- made chicken soup; and another read the same book as the patient so they could discuss it together. Such acts of genuine caring paired with the delivery of some of the most advanced medical care have made Nebraska Medicine the hub of medical expertise in the region. The care expertise of this distinguished establishment dates back many dec- ades. Today, it represents the clini- cal integration of Nebraska Medical Center, Bellevue Medical Center and University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) Physicians clinics. It is also the clinical and academic partner of the UNMC. Well known for its transplanta- tion services, Nebraska Medicine also specializes in oncology, cardiology “We came here because it’s the best care you’ll ever get. The team is wonderful. They speak to you straight and know how to communicate.” Tonora M., mother of a multi-organ transplant patient Tonora M. shares a warm moment with her son Brendon’s transplantation surgeon Dr. Wendy J. Grant.
  • 24. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 22 Life Size “Austin was 15 months old when he had his first liver transplant. Today, he is 20-years old, so we have a long history here. When the team comes in, they look at the whole picture. It’s all about Austin.” Emiley G., Austin’s mother and neurology, and provides services in some 50 additional specialties to patients state-, nation- and world- wide. Nebraska Medicine has a staff that includes thousands of physicians and nurses. Serious Medicine, Extraordinary Care manifests in other remarkable ways, notably at the Lied Transplant Center. This is one of the leading centers in the country for solid organ (kidney, liver, pancreas, small bowel, and intestine, bone marrow, heart and soon, lung transplants). “The Quality of Life component, whether it’s for newborns, patients with multi-organ transplants or those in intestinal rehab programs, is an essential part of it,” explains Dr. Alan Langnas, Director of Liver Transplantation. Previously, patients with organ failure were told they had a fatal, irreversible disease and were left without hope of recov- ery. Today, Nebraska Medicine offers innovative programs and procedures that enable most transplant patients to lead normal lives. While medical and technological advances are important, Dr. Langnas especially emphasizes family, phy- sician and patient interactions, and the engagement, thoughtfulness and commitment of the transplantation team. The multi-disciplinary team of surgeons, physicians, pediatricians, dieticians, nurses, coordinators, social “our job is to reassure Patients and make them feel comfortable and safe. When they arrive, we like to say that we give them a warm Nebraska welcome. For patients to be successful they have to be active participants in their own healing; there has to be a partnership between the caregiver and the care-receiver.” Dr. Alan Langnas, Director of Liver Transplantation The transplant surgeon regularly visits Austin G., a 20-years old liver transplant patient.
  • 25. 23 “I am a healthy liverTransplant survivor of 17 years. I work at the hotel located within Nebraska Medicine and speak with patients who are struggling with the process. It reassures them to know that I am one of them. The whole concept of the hotel is to make sure that everyone feels safe and supported. Some families with little babies may stay for a year. I make sure they have everything they need.” David Eggers, Concierge, Guest Services, Nebraska House
  • 26. A mother wheels her son, a very young transplant patient, through the food hall for a special treat.
  • 27. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 25 Life Size “Art and nature have the power to inspire,relieve stress and heal patients, families, clinical and support staff. So, in partnership with the Joslyn Art Museum of Omaha, we are building a healing arts program and a healing garden that will be available to all. In addition, technology will be used to enhance the cancer patient’s healing process. Patients will have an iPad in their room to be used as part of the healing arts program and as a health-monitoring device. It is our hope that this cancer center’s approach to care and to cancer research will enable a powerful, unprecedented and transformative experience for everyone.” Dr. Ken Cowan, Director, Fred Pamela Buffett Cancer Center “My attending nurses are kind, comforting and friendly. They speak right to me and they are there in a heartbeat whenever I need them. I can count on them for anything.” Mark B., stem cell transplant patient workers and psychiatrists also prides itself on providing communication, education and support during every step of the journey,” concludes Dr. Langnas. It is the combination of medical expertise and the assurance of hope, communi- cation and genuine human armth that ensures the Quality of Life and healing. The new Fred Pamela Buffett Can- cer Center, a joint project between Nebraska Medicine and UNMC, elevates the term multi-disciplinary to new heights. Currently under construction with a 2017 completion date, the center will include a 10-story, 98 lab, state-of- the-art research tower that integrates the science of what causes and drives cancer with the care of cancer patients. With this truly integrated approach, all the research, consultations, multi-dis- ciplinary cancer expertise (lymphoma, transplantation, pancreatic, bone marrow, breast, head and neck, lung) and patient care will come together under the same roof. The center will also house offices, operating rooms, radiation and chemotherapy rooms, physicians’ offices, a seven-story, 108-bed inpatient treatment center, a multi-disciplinary outpatient center, a 175-seat restaurant, and other cancer specialty services—physical therapists, nutritionists, socio-financial advisors, psychologists, child and family care specialists, massage therapists and socio-estheticians. “The goal is that we want to provide one-stop shopping Mark B., a stem cell transplant patient, having a laugh with his Nurse and Case Manager.
  • 28. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 26 Life Size 1,200nutritious and delicious patient meals served each day by Sodexo’s At Your Request Room Service. “Food and nutrition is an essential component of the patient’s experience and sense of well-being at Nebraska Medicine. Whether it’s for the meal program, At Your Request Room Service, which serves 1,200 patient meals a day, or for one of the three sit-down venues for staff and visitors, the food meets four critical criteria. It must be safe, nutritious, healthy and delicious. We must be sure that everything we deliver is as requested by the patient, and respects their dietary restrictions. We are a key part of the patient’s healthcare and have an obligation to be precise.” Cathy Miedl, Sodexo Head of Hotel Services A member of Sodexo’s Clinical Technical Management team, verifies the proper functioning of medical equipment. for our cancer patients, and bring clini- cians and researchers closer together,” says Dr. Ken Cowan, Director, Fred Pamela Buffett Cancer Center. Nebraska Medicine would not be able to execute its mission without its 2,500 nurses, the largest sector of more than 7,000-person workforce. Nurses pro- mote relationship-based care sharing —meaning they care for themselves, colleagues, and first and foremost, patients and their families. “In order to meet our patients’ every need, we must be able to step back and examine our processes to ensure that we deliver the highest level of care for a successful recovery,” says Rosanna Morris, Chief Nursing Officer and interim CEO of Nebraska Medicine. “Our shared gov- ernance structure allows us to do that.” Nurse committees manage areas such as quality, professional development and patient experience. They meet reg- ularly and examine patient satisfaction scores; allowing nurses to identify both successes and areas of improvement. They also perform daily patient rounds and inquire about patient experience in real-time so they can proactively improve on areas that fall short. In addition to providing real-time recognition for a job performed well, several initiatives keep the nurses motivated. These include unit-based roundtables during which nurses
  • 29. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 27 resolve a variety of issues, and popular monthly lunches, hosted by Morris for 30 to 40 nurses at a time. The lunches allow nurses to relax, speak openly and ask questions, which has fostered an open exchange of accurate, relevant information. “By caring for our nurses and giving them a voice, they in turn take excellent care of our patients, and do whatever it takes to give them what they need,” says Morris. Because patient needs are as varied as the patients themselves, Nebraska Medicine has reached beyond the provi- sion of traditional comfort services to include less conventional services as well. Pet therapy, offered twice a week, allows patients who miss their four- legged friends an opportunity to have moments of comfort and joy, which helps with their healing process. And to improve the comfort and ease of its many international patients, Nebraska Medicine offers a 24/7 languages sup- port in 165 languages. What happens behind the scenes at Nebraska Medicine is also critical to ena- bling the provision of extraordinary care. Wayne Howell, Sodexo Resident District Manager, and Sodexo Operations Man- ager Randy Peacock, oversee a team of 22 that ensures that all hospital equip- ment, from electronic thermometers to MRI machines and wheelchairs to sur- gery beds, functions properly. “We see ourselves as the safeguards of the hos- pital’s operations, and our priority is to Inside the kitchen, a Sodexo staff member prepares a healthy meal for patients.
  • 30. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 28 Life Size get the repaired equipment back into circulation as quickly and effectively as possible. This is how we can best help the clinical staff do their jobs,” Howell says. His department not only maintains and repairs, it is also involved with equip- ment assessments and purchasing, and works closely with the clinical staff to understand their needs. Environmental Services at Nebra­ ska Medicine, “are all about main- taining high cleaning standards and providing outstanding hospitality,” says Paul Turner, Sodexo Resident District Manager, Healthcare Services. In addition to monitoring performance via patient questionnaires and real- time interviews (3,500 every month), Sodexo implements innovative clean- ing techniques to ensure continuous improvement. The Xenex robot uses powerful pulsations of non-toxic UV light to effectively destroy germs and bacteria in five minutes. All 265 mem- bers of the cleaning team are Sodexo- trained and certified, a process that takes six to 12 months. “Improving Quality of Life in a hospital promotes healing,” says Turner. “By making sure that Nebraska Medicine is the clean- est hospital in the area, we are doing just that.” 3,500 patients interviewed every month to monitor performance. University of Nebraska Medical Center medical students make patient rounds with Dr. Wendy J. Grant. “The medical school creates an atmosphere where students can be very successful in learning to care for patients. We follow an Integrative Clinical Experience Program throughout all four years of training. It teaches us that caring for patients means building relationships, and learning how to relate on all levels—clinical, emotional, social and psychological. It’s about understanding the patient and their whole environment in order to treat them effectively. This has been invaluable to me and I have seen how it helps to heal patients.” Whitney Bossert, 4th year Medical Student at University of Nebraska Medical Center
  • 31. 29 Even if every worker within a hospital has a critical role to play, transporters can sometimes be an overlooked source of quality patient care. But with the right training, tools and organization, they have the power to change the patient experience during a hospital stay. They can also allow medical staff to focus more closely on clinical responsibilities, becoming a source of improved efficiency for hospitals as well. Improving the patient experience through transport services
  • 32. 30Healthcare FACILITIES International review User Guide Transport Services Capitalizing on the critical role of transporters Transporters move nearly everything within a hospital—from transporting patients to delivering specimens, equipment and documents. While their role is largely logistical, they play an integral role in shaping the patient’s impression of a hospital. Sodexo pinpointed a way to improve the efficiency of transport services while ensuring that each specialist contributes to improving the Quality of Life of patients and staff alike. A uniformed system strengthens multi-tasking capabilities Sodexo’s role: All hospital transporters are unified into a single team. As this centralization requires transporters to be capable of any task at any time, the skillsets of individual transporters are raised across the board. Sodexo’s transport services can be tailored to meet the needs of any hospital—whether training and managing a hospital’s own team of transporters or providing Sodexo staff. The benefits: Transporters now have the training and capabilities to respond to the needs of the emergency room, operating suite or diagnostic imaging. The amount of downtime between tasks is reduced as these multi-functional transporters can respond to the needs of any busy department. A highly trained team ensures patient safety and comfort Sodexo’s role: A selection of transporters are trained to take on specialized tasks. While some obtain advanced life support qualifications, others learn disease prevention techniques to limit the spread of hospital-acquired infections. When moving patients between departments, transporters are also trained to identify signs of distress. The benefits: The ability to handle certain clinical elements allows transporters to take on tasks that were previously handled by nurses. For example, trained transporters can accompany patients with more serious medical conditions to MRI appointments and be responsible for their well-being during exams. This shift in responsibility frees up the time of clinical staff to spend more time with patients and focus on other more vital aspects of patient care.
  • 33. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 31 A human touch sets patients at ease Sodexo’s role: The “high-touch” approach to patient transport means that transporters do much more than simply deliver patients to their appointments. As patients tend to be anxious in the unfamiliar hospital environment and can feel uneasy in their hospital gowns in public areas, each trip to an exam or surgery, which takes an average of 18 to 25 minutes, presents a crucial opportunity to improve the patient experience. The benefits: With the right training, transporters themselves can capitalize on the time they spend with patients and become key players in their care. In creating bonds with patients, they set them at ease, lower anxiety, increase their comfort level and help to preserve their dignity. Advanced technology reduces wait times and raises efficiency Sodexo’s role: The use of a transport software application streamlines the logistical aspects of patient care. Once medical staff logs requests into the application, transporters can self-assign tasks. Completed items are logged into the system and transporters are automatically assigned their next task based on where they are in the hospital via an iPhone or iPad. The benefits: These real-time updates inform transporters when nearby patients are ready for pickup, thus reducing wait times and inefficient trips across the hospital. The software application can also be configured to track equipment – ensuring that a device is exactly where it should be and minimizing the time that unnecessary rental equipment remains in hospitals. +20%improvement in service response time was also recorded in these hospitals. +25%higher productivity rates were experienced in US hospitals that use Sodexo transport services.
  • 34. Sodexo newsaround the world At Sodexo, we believe that improving Quality of Life leads to the progress of individuals and contributes to the performance of organizations. In addition to the range of services we provide to hospitals and senior care facilities, Sodexo teams work to ensure the well-being of individuals in companies, schools and universities, military bases, prisons, remote environments such as oil and gas platforms, as well as mines. Through over 100 different services, Sodexo improves the Quality of Life of 75 million people around the world every day. Read about some of the latest Sodexo news around the world.
  • 35. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 33 Sodexo has secured two contracts with samsung in the middle east and asia. Improving the Quality of Life of Samsung teams SODEXO IS IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF LIFE OF THE SAMSUNG ENGINEERING TEAMS in Ruwais, Abu Dhabi, who are constructing an oil and carbon black processing plant. When this refinery opens at the end of 2015, it will produce 40,000 tons of carbon black pigment a year and 30,000 barrels of crude oil per day. Sodexo services include catering, housekeeping, laundry, pest control, camp management, corrective maintenance and the management of recreational facilities. In a very different contract, Samsung Electronics turned to Sodexo for a corporate Benefits and Rewards service in Indonesia. The campaign focuses on incentivizing sales people working at independent, multi-branded retailers. The aim is to encourage sales of Samsung, without using a cash incentive. Sodexo has met this need by providing Gift Pass Vouchers, which in Indonesia can be used to buy basic commodities such as rice, milk and other groceries, along with items such as children’s books. Based on this, the offer has been extended to Samsung’s own branded stores to incentivize sales of specific models.
  • 36. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 34 The ability to influence the way companies behave by posting comments on social media and e-commerce sites has created a new form of public accountability, according to the Sodexo 2015 Workplace Trends Report. Online reviews by workers and consumers have given rise to a new “Rateocracy” that demands real- time management of companies’ reputations. So in an era when $3.6 trillion worth of retail sales are directly influenced by online ratings, CEOs need to offer an honest and inspirational vision that connects employees and consumers. Sodexo’s Workplace Trends Report shows the rise of “Rateocracy” Serving up a better Quality of Life in FRENCH middle schoolS Sodexo services now improve the Quality of Life of 10,000 French middle schools students. Under a four-year contract, Sodexo teams will prepare daily meals on-site and will also provide cleaning and maintenance services. Supporting China’s leading retail giant China and the world of online retail are two markets with a big reputation for growth: put them together and you have Vipshop (VIP.com) – a new Sodexo customer for food services. Vipshop is China’s leading flash sale website for discounted branded products. Discover the Sodexo Workplace Trends Report 2015.
  • 37. 35 Ensuring the well-being of French troops Sodexo helps French Armed Forces deliver a facilities project in the South Pacific. To support a modernization program on the French Poly- nesian atoll of Moruroa, France’s Ministry of Defense has turned to Sodexo for a comprehensive Remote Sites con- tract. Sodexo’s experience with French forces overseas and its expertise in challenging environments played a key in the selection process for the three-year TELSITE project. Sodexo will oversee the construction, transportation and installation of the camp. To ensure the well-being of on-site personnel, Sodexo will provide food services from local suppliers and will set up and run sports and welfare facilities.
  • 38. Leading the waY in facilities management 36 Sodexo’s global facilities management offer gets a nod from the Institute of Asset Management Sodexo has become the first outsourcing com- pany to receive the prestigious Asset Manage- ment Achievement Award from the Institute of Asset Management. This recognition reflects the fact that Sodexo is the only facility manage- ment provider to offer global services in a wide range of industries, and is able to deploy best practices across all its sites.
  • 39. Healthcare FACILITIES International review 37 Partnering to REDUCE crime in the uk Sodexo and crime reduction charity Nacro have won six regional probation contracts in England and Wales. Together, the two organizations will manage probation services for low to medium-risk offenders for a seven-year period. Sodexo Justice Services have been working with the UK government to protect the public and rehabilitate offenders since 1993. setting the standard in sustainability For the eighth consecutive year, the RobecoSAM Sustainability Yearbook ranked Sodexo as its Industry Leader for economic, social and environmental performance. In the 2015 edition, Sodexo is once again the only company in its industry to achieve the “Gold” Status Class. An enriched Quality of Life offer Sodexo has always sought out ways to enrich its and global incentive and recognition offers. In November 2014, the Group did just that with the acquisition of Motivcom plc, a leading corporate benefits and rewards provider in the UK.
  • 40. The Quality of Life Experiences magazine is available ON LINE on sodexo.com/healthcare in this issue “Maintaining excellent Quality of Life at the hospital is the result of strong, continuous teamwork and a commitment to individual and collective well-being.” Rosanna Morris, Chief Nursing Officer at Nebraska Medicine and interim CEO of Nebraska Medicine Explore the daily life of staff, patients and medical students at Nebraska Medicine in the Life Size section, p. 18. The brain is a non-stop learning machine. As we age, it doesn’t get weaker, on the contrary it simply knows more. Read more about the Myth of Cognitive Decline in the Aging Well section, p. 14. 20%improvement in service response time was achieved by hospitals using Sodexo’s transport services Discover how transport services foster better patient care and more efficient management in the User Guide section, p. 29. What if undergoing surgery without actually going under led to a faster recovery? Hear what two Belgian anesthesiologists have to say on the subject. See how medical hypnosis is improving the Quality of Life of patients in the Meet the Experts section, p. 18. 60%of hosital managers deal with intergenerational tension between staff members Read more about the multi-generational workforce in today’s hospitals in the Issues and Topics section, p. 10.