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Magandang gabi
sa ating lahat.
Here starts
the lesson!
Disclaimer
1. The concepts, ideas, theories, and still and motion images
used in this presentation are used purely for educational
purposes only. The presenter does not claim ownership of
such materials.
2. Fair Use of a Copyrighted Work as defined in Sec. 185 of
R.A. 8293 or the Intellectual Property Code of the
Philippines, states, “The fair use of a copyrighted work for
criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching including
multiple copies for classroom use, scholarship, research,
and similar purposes is not an infringement of copyright.
xxx”
What will be discussed?
1. Teacher’s Philosophical Formation
2. The Foundational Principles of
Morality
3. Teacher’s Values Formation
4. Teaching as a Vocation, Mission and
Profession
Objectives
Objective #1
Scrutinize the
philosophical
foundations of
education
Objective #3
Discuss how teacher’s
form their own
Philosophical
Statements
Objective #2
Applying the
philosophy of
education in some
educational situations
Objective #4
Build your own
teacher’s
philosophical
statement
PHILOSOPHY
Introduction
Comes from two Greek
Words
PHILO – love
SOPHOS – wisdom
Love of Wisdom
PHILOSOPHY in EDUCATION
Introduction
GOALS
FORMS
METHODS
MEANING
Jean Paul Satre
“EXISTENCE PRECEDS ESSENCE”
01 EXISTENTIALISM
Soren Kierkegaard
EXISTENTIALISM
01
Philosophy of
Subjectivity
02
No one is in
control of your
life except
yourself
03
People are free
to choose what
to make of their
lives and their
individual
passions are
what drives them
EXISTENTIALISM
Why teach?
1. To help students understand and
appreciate themselves as individuals
because they are born uniquely and
differently from the rest of the world.
2. To be taught how to accept complete
responsibility of their thoughts,
feelings and actions.
EXISTENTIALISM
The Existentialist teacher’s role:
1. To help students define their own
essence.
2. Since feeling is not divorced from
reason in decision making. The
existentialist demands the education of
the whole person, “not just the mind.”
EXISTENTIALISM
What to teach?
1. Students are given a wide variety of options
from which to choose from
2. The humanities, however, are given tremendous
emphasis to provide students with vicarious
experience that will help unleash their own
creativity and self-expression.
3. Teacher helps students define their essence
4. Holistic development - make good decisions
5. Learner-centered
6. Teachers should not impose values since
values are personal.
William Bagley
“ESSENCE PRECEDES EXISTENCE”
02 ESSENTIALISM
James Koerner
ESSENTIALISM
Why teach?
1. The role of the teachers is to teach learners the
basic knowledge, skills and values.
2. Traditional approach or back to basic approach that
emphasizes the basic skills or the fundamental 4
r's (reading, 'riting, 'rithmetic, right conduct)
3. Essentialist programs are academically rigorous,
curriculum centered.
4. Foci - Math, Natural Science, History, Foreign
Language, and Literature
ESSENTIALISM
Why teach?
5. The teachers and administrators decide what is
most important for the students to learn without
considering students' interest, background and
learning style.
6. Teacher-centered - everything comes from the
teacher
7. Rely heavily on the use of prescribed textbooks,
method: drill method, the lecture method,
memorization and discipline
JOHN WATSON
“ESSENCE PRECEDES EXISTENCE”
03 BEHAVIORISM
B.F. SKINNER
Defining Features
1. Human beings are shaped
by the environment.
2. Man – neither good/bad –
are product of the
society.
3. A behaviorist school are
concerned with the
modification and shaping
of the students.
Why Teach?
1. 1. Behaviorist
school are concerned
with the
modification and
shaping of students.
BEHAVIORISM
How to teach?
1. Teachers create classroom atmosphere/climate that
is conducive for learning
• Physical Climate
• Psychological Climate
2. Teachers ought to make the lesson as clear and
interesting as possible to capture and hold the
learners' attention
3. Power of positive reinforcements and appropriate
incentives to eliminate negative ones
Robert Hutchins
04 PERENNIALISM
Mortimer Adler
Defining Features
1. Ageless, eternal,
unchanged
2. Truth is universal - does
not depend on circumstances
of time, place, and person
(transcendent truths and
values)
Why teach?
● We are all rational
animals. Schools should,
therefore, develop the
students' rational and
moral powers.
● According to Aristotle,
if we neglect the
students' reasoning
skills, we deprive them
of their ability to use
their higher faculties
to control their
passions and appetites
PERENNIALISM
● The perennialist
curriculum is a universal
one on the view that human
beings possess the same
essential nature.
● It is heavy on the
humanities, on general
education.
● There is less emphasis on
vocational and technical
education.
What to teach?
● What the perennialist
teachers teach are lifted
from the Great Books
● History, religion,
literature (past ideas -
relevant) Understand the
great work of civilization
● Curriculum - based on
recurrent themes
How to teach?
● Teacher -centered
● It's also curriculum
based
● Students engaged in
Socratic dialogues, or
mutual inquiry sessions
to develop an
understanding of
history's most timeless
concepts
Jean Piaget
05 CONSTRUCTIVISM
Jean Piaget
● He identified the
processes of
assimilation and
accommodation that are
key in this interaction
as individuals construct
new knowledge from their
experiences.
● Assimilation - absorbing
new information and
experience and
incorporate them into
our pre-existing ideas
(schema).
● Accommodation - process
in which new information
replaces old beliefs
Defining features
Why teach?
Constructivist sees to
develop intrinsically
motivated and independent
learners adequately equipped
with learning skills for
them to be able to construct
knowledge and make meaning
of them
CONSTRUCTIVISM
What to teach?
1. The learners are taught how to learn
2. They are taught learning process and
skills such as searching, critiquing and
evaluation of information, drawing
inferences, posing questions out of the
information provided.
3. The teacher provides students with data
or experiences that allow them to
hypothesize, predict, manipulate objects,
pose questions, research, investigate,
imagine and invent .
CONSTRUCTIVISM
What to teach?
4. The constructivist classroom is
interactive. It promotes dialogical exchange
of ideas among learners and between teachers
and learners.
5. The teacher's role is to facilitate this
process.
6. Their minds are full of ideas waiting to be
"midwifed" by the teacher with his/her
skillful facilitating skills.
John Dewey
06 PROGRESSIVISM
“Learning by
Doing”
Defining Features
1. Contrasted – essentialism
and perennialism
2. Change and growth
3. Learners should be
enlightened and
intelligent to fully live
NOW.
PROGRESSIVISM
Why teach?
- Progressivist teachers teach to
develop learners into becoming
enlightned and intelligent citizens
of a democratic society.
- This group of teachers teach
learners so they may live life
fully NOW not to prepare them for
adult life.
PROGRESSIVISM
What to teach?
1. The progressivists are identified with need-based
and relevant curriculum.
2. This is curriculum that "responds to the students'
needs and they relate to the students' personal
lives and experiences."
3. Change is the only thing that does not change.
Hence, progressivist teacher are more concerned
with teaching the learners the skills to cope with
change.
4. The subject that are given emphasis in
progressivist schools are the natural and social
sciences.
PROGRESSIVISM
What to teach?
5. Teachers expose students to many scientific,
technological , and social developments, reflecting the
progressivist notion that progress and change are
fundamental.
6. Progressivist teachers employ experiential methods -
"One learns by doing"
7. Book learning is no substitute for actual experience
(Dewey). One experiential teaching method that
progressivist teachers heavily rely on is the problem-
solving method.
8. Method: "hands-on-minds-on-hearts-on" teaching methods
like field trips, thought provoking games, and puzzles.
07
SOCIAL
RECONSTRUCTIONISM
Defining Feature
Philosophy that
emphasizes the addressing
of social questions and a
quest to create a better
society and worldwide
democracy
Why Teach?
1. To attain social reform
How to teach?
1. Social issues are dealt
through dialogue, inquiry,
and multiple perspectives
2. Community based learning
is utilized
What to Teach?
1. Curriculum focuses on
student taking social
action in solving real
problems
Let’s Practice
a. Essentialism
b. Progressivism
c. Constructivism
d. Existentialism
1. When we teach
our objections
to abortion and
the Reproductive
Health bill, our
thought goes
with?
01
a. Essentialism
b. Progressivism
c. Constructivism
d. Existentialism
Let’s Practice
a. Essentialism
b. Constructivism
c. Behaviorism
d. Progressivism
Which educational
Philosophy is
achieved when the
teacher developed
intrinsically
motivated learners
through experiential
learning?
02
a. Essentialism
b. Constructivism
c. Behaviorism
d. Progressivism
Let’s Practice
a. Existentialism
b. Constructivism
c. Behaviorism
d. Progressivism
After listening to
the priest about
morality, John has a
moment of
reflection. His
understanding of
morality has become
deeper as he relates
it to his past
experiences.
03
a. Existentialism
b. Constructivism
c. Behaviorism
d. Progressivism
Let’s Practice
a. Essentialism
b. Constructivism
c. Behaviorism
d. Progressivism
Which philosophy of
education is
achieved when a
teacher mainly
focuses on the
essentials skills
and the basics of
literacy?
04
a. Essentialism
b. Constructivism
c. Behaviorism
d. Progressivism
Let’s Practice
a. Existentialism
b. Perennialism
c. Progressivism
d. Social
Reconstructionism
Scouting or Citizens
Army Training (CAT)
gives training in
character building,
citizenship training,
etc., which leads to
the creation of a new
social order and a new
society eventually.
What philosophy
supports this?
05
a. Existentialism
b. Perennialism
c. Progressivism
d. Social
Reconstructionism
Let’s Practice
a. Behaviorism
b. Progressivism
c. Existentialism
d. Essentialism
Mr. Santos says: "If
it's Mobile Legend that
brings students outside
of the classroom, let
us bring it to the
classroom. Maybe I can
use it to teach Math."
To which philosophy
does Mr. Santos adhere?
06
a. Behaviorism
b. Progressivism
c. Existentialism
d. Essentialism
Let’s Practice
a. The pragmatist
b. The existentialist
c. The behaviorist
d. The essentialist
Who is more likely to
advise you to modify
your classroom
environment in such a
way that your
students will be
motivated to learn?
07
a. The pragmatist
b. The existentialist
c. The behaviorist
d. The essentialist
Writing your
Teaching Philosopy
Tailoring of Teacher’s
Philosophical Statement
"A teaching (philosophy)
statement is a purposeful and
reflective essay about the
author’s teaching beliefs and
practices. It is an individual
narrative that includes not only
one’s beliefs about the teaching
and learning process but also
concrete examples of the ways in
which he or she enacts these
beliefs in the classroom.“
(Vanderbilt University)
Ohio State University
Center for the
Advancement Teaching
Teaching philosophy
statement is important
because a clear
philosophy of teaching
can lead to a change in
teaching behavior and
foster professional and
personal growth.
Why make
1. You might be writing it as an exercise in concisely
documenting your beliefs so that you can easily articulate
them to your students, peers, or a search committee.
2. It might serve as the introduction to your teaching portfolio.
3. Or, it can serve as a means of professional growth as it
requires you to give examples of how you enact your
philosophy, thus requiring you to consider the degree to
which your teaching is congruent with your beliefs.
"My philosophy of education is that all children are unique and
must have a stimulating educational environment where they can
grow physically, mentally, emotionally, and socially. It is my
desire to create this type of atmosphere where students can meet
their full potential. I will provide a safe environment where
students are invited to share their ideas and take risks.
"I believe that there are five essential elements that are
conducive to learning. (1) The teacher's role is to act as a
guide. (2) Students must have access to hands-on activities. (3)
Students should be able to have choices and let their curiosity
direct their learning. (4) Students need the opportunity to
practice skills in a safe environment. (5) Technology must be
incorporated into the school day."
01 Example
"I believe that all children are unique and have something
special that they can bring to their own education. I will
assist my students to express themselves and accept themselves
for who they are, as well embrace the differences of others.
"Every classroom has its own unique community; my role as the
teacher will be to assist each child in developing their own
potential and learning styles. I will present a curriculum that
will incorporate each different learning style, as well as make
the content relevant to the students' lives. I will incorporate
hands-on learning, cooperative learning, projects, themes, and
individual work that engage and activate students learning."
02 Example
Guide questions on writing
your Philosophical Statement
Your concept of learning
What do you mean by learning? What
happens in a successful learning
situation?
Your concept of teaching
What are your values, beliefs, and
aspirations as a teacher? Do you wish
to encourage mastery, competency,
transformational learning, lifelong
learning, general transference of
skills, critical thinking? What does a
perfect teaching situation look like
to you and why? How are the values and
beliefs realized in classroom
activities?
Your goals for students
What skills should students obtain as
a result of your teaching?
Your teaching method
What methods will you consider to reach
these goals and objectives? What are
your beliefs regarding learning theory
and specific strategies you would use,
such as case studies, group work,
simulations, interactive lectures?
Your interaction with the students
What are you attitudes towards advising
and mentoring students? How would an
observer see you interact with
students? Why do you want to work with
students?
Guide questions on writing
your Philosophical Statement
Assessing learning
How will you assess student growth
and learning? What are your beliefs
about grading? Do you grade students
on a percentage scale (criterion
referenced) or on a curve (norm
referenced)? What different types of
assessment will you use (i.e.
traditional tests, projects,
portfolios, presentations) and why?
Personal Growth
How will you continue growing as a
teacher? What goals do you have for
yourself and how will you reach them?
How have your attitudes towards
teaching and learning changed over
time? How will you use student
evaluations to improve your teaching?
How might you learn new skills? How do
you know when you've taught
effectively?
Thanks!

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Philosophical foundations-of-education

  • 1. Magandang gabi sa ating lahat. Here starts the lesson!
  • 2. Disclaimer 1. The concepts, ideas, theories, and still and motion images used in this presentation are used purely for educational purposes only. The presenter does not claim ownership of such materials. 2. Fair Use of a Copyrighted Work as defined in Sec. 185 of R.A. 8293 or the Intellectual Property Code of the Philippines, states, “The fair use of a copyrighted work for criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching including multiple copies for classroom use, scholarship, research, and similar purposes is not an infringement of copyright. xxx”
  • 3. What will be discussed? 1. Teacher’s Philosophical Formation 2. The Foundational Principles of Morality 3. Teacher’s Values Formation 4. Teaching as a Vocation, Mission and Profession
  • 4. Objectives Objective #1 Scrutinize the philosophical foundations of education Objective #3 Discuss how teacher’s form their own Philosophical Statements Objective #2 Applying the philosophy of education in some educational situations Objective #4 Build your own teacher’s philosophical statement
  • 5. PHILOSOPHY Introduction Comes from two Greek Words PHILO – love SOPHOS – wisdom Love of Wisdom
  • 7. Jean Paul Satre “EXISTENCE PRECEDS ESSENCE” 01 EXISTENTIALISM Soren Kierkegaard
  • 8. EXISTENTIALISM 01 Philosophy of Subjectivity 02 No one is in control of your life except yourself 03 People are free to choose what to make of their lives and their individual passions are what drives them
  • 9. EXISTENTIALISM Why teach? 1. To help students understand and appreciate themselves as individuals because they are born uniquely and differently from the rest of the world. 2. To be taught how to accept complete responsibility of their thoughts, feelings and actions.
  • 10. EXISTENTIALISM The Existentialist teacher’s role: 1. To help students define their own essence. 2. Since feeling is not divorced from reason in decision making. The existentialist demands the education of the whole person, “not just the mind.”
  • 11. EXISTENTIALISM What to teach? 1. Students are given a wide variety of options from which to choose from 2. The humanities, however, are given tremendous emphasis to provide students with vicarious experience that will help unleash their own creativity and self-expression. 3. Teacher helps students define their essence 4. Holistic development - make good decisions 5. Learner-centered 6. Teachers should not impose values since values are personal.
  • 12. William Bagley “ESSENCE PRECEDES EXISTENCE” 02 ESSENTIALISM James Koerner
  • 13. ESSENTIALISM Why teach? 1. The role of the teachers is to teach learners the basic knowledge, skills and values. 2. Traditional approach or back to basic approach that emphasizes the basic skills or the fundamental 4 r's (reading, 'riting, 'rithmetic, right conduct) 3. Essentialist programs are academically rigorous, curriculum centered. 4. Foci - Math, Natural Science, History, Foreign Language, and Literature
  • 14. ESSENTIALISM Why teach? 5. The teachers and administrators decide what is most important for the students to learn without considering students' interest, background and learning style. 6. Teacher-centered - everything comes from the teacher 7. Rely heavily on the use of prescribed textbooks, method: drill method, the lecture method, memorization and discipline
  • 15. JOHN WATSON “ESSENCE PRECEDES EXISTENCE” 03 BEHAVIORISM B.F. SKINNER
  • 16. Defining Features 1. Human beings are shaped by the environment. 2. Man – neither good/bad – are product of the society. 3. A behaviorist school are concerned with the modification and shaping of the students.
  • 17. Why Teach? 1. 1. Behaviorist school are concerned with the modification and shaping of students.
  • 18. BEHAVIORISM How to teach? 1. Teachers create classroom atmosphere/climate that is conducive for learning • Physical Climate • Psychological Climate 2. Teachers ought to make the lesson as clear and interesting as possible to capture and hold the learners' attention 3. Power of positive reinforcements and appropriate incentives to eliminate negative ones
  • 20. Defining Features 1. Ageless, eternal, unchanged 2. Truth is universal - does not depend on circumstances of time, place, and person (transcendent truths and values)
  • 21. Why teach? ● We are all rational animals. Schools should, therefore, develop the students' rational and moral powers. ● According to Aristotle, if we neglect the students' reasoning skills, we deprive them of their ability to use their higher faculties to control their passions and appetites PERENNIALISM
  • 22. ● The perennialist curriculum is a universal one on the view that human beings possess the same essential nature. ● It is heavy on the humanities, on general education. ● There is less emphasis on vocational and technical education. What to teach? ● What the perennialist teachers teach are lifted from the Great Books ● History, religion, literature (past ideas - relevant) Understand the great work of civilization ● Curriculum - based on recurrent themes
  • 23. How to teach? ● Teacher -centered ● It's also curriculum based ● Students engaged in Socratic dialogues, or mutual inquiry sessions to develop an understanding of history's most timeless concepts
  • 25. Jean Piaget ● He identified the processes of assimilation and accommodation that are key in this interaction as individuals construct new knowledge from their experiences. ● Assimilation - absorbing new information and experience and incorporate them into our pre-existing ideas (schema). ● Accommodation - process in which new information replaces old beliefs Defining features
  • 26. Why teach? Constructivist sees to develop intrinsically motivated and independent learners adequately equipped with learning skills for them to be able to construct knowledge and make meaning of them
  • 27. CONSTRUCTIVISM What to teach? 1. The learners are taught how to learn 2. They are taught learning process and skills such as searching, critiquing and evaluation of information, drawing inferences, posing questions out of the information provided. 3. The teacher provides students with data or experiences that allow them to hypothesize, predict, manipulate objects, pose questions, research, investigate, imagine and invent .
  • 28. CONSTRUCTIVISM What to teach? 4. The constructivist classroom is interactive. It promotes dialogical exchange of ideas among learners and between teachers and learners. 5. The teacher's role is to facilitate this process. 6. Their minds are full of ideas waiting to be "midwifed" by the teacher with his/her skillful facilitating skills.
  • 30. Defining Features 1. Contrasted – essentialism and perennialism 2. Change and growth 3. Learners should be enlightened and intelligent to fully live NOW.
  • 31. PROGRESSIVISM Why teach? - Progressivist teachers teach to develop learners into becoming enlightned and intelligent citizens of a democratic society. - This group of teachers teach learners so they may live life fully NOW not to prepare them for adult life.
  • 32. PROGRESSIVISM What to teach? 1. The progressivists are identified with need-based and relevant curriculum. 2. This is curriculum that "responds to the students' needs and they relate to the students' personal lives and experiences." 3. Change is the only thing that does not change. Hence, progressivist teacher are more concerned with teaching the learners the skills to cope with change. 4. The subject that are given emphasis in progressivist schools are the natural and social sciences.
  • 33. PROGRESSIVISM What to teach? 5. Teachers expose students to many scientific, technological , and social developments, reflecting the progressivist notion that progress and change are fundamental. 6. Progressivist teachers employ experiential methods - "One learns by doing" 7. Book learning is no substitute for actual experience (Dewey). One experiential teaching method that progressivist teachers heavily rely on is the problem- solving method. 8. Method: "hands-on-minds-on-hearts-on" teaching methods like field trips, thought provoking games, and puzzles.
  • 35. Defining Feature Philosophy that emphasizes the addressing of social questions and a quest to create a better society and worldwide democracy
  • 36. Why Teach? 1. To attain social reform How to teach? 1. Social issues are dealt through dialogue, inquiry, and multiple perspectives 2. Community based learning is utilized What to Teach? 1. Curriculum focuses on student taking social action in solving real problems
  • 37. Let’s Practice a. Essentialism b. Progressivism c. Constructivism d. Existentialism 1. When we teach our objections to abortion and the Reproductive Health bill, our thought goes with? 01 a. Essentialism b. Progressivism c. Constructivism d. Existentialism
  • 38. Let’s Practice a. Essentialism b. Constructivism c. Behaviorism d. Progressivism Which educational Philosophy is achieved when the teacher developed intrinsically motivated learners through experiential learning? 02 a. Essentialism b. Constructivism c. Behaviorism d. Progressivism
  • 39. Let’s Practice a. Existentialism b. Constructivism c. Behaviorism d. Progressivism After listening to the priest about morality, John has a moment of reflection. His understanding of morality has become deeper as he relates it to his past experiences. 03 a. Existentialism b. Constructivism c. Behaviorism d. Progressivism
  • 40. Let’s Practice a. Essentialism b. Constructivism c. Behaviorism d. Progressivism Which philosophy of education is achieved when a teacher mainly focuses on the essentials skills and the basics of literacy? 04 a. Essentialism b. Constructivism c. Behaviorism d. Progressivism
  • 41. Let’s Practice a. Existentialism b. Perennialism c. Progressivism d. Social Reconstructionism Scouting or Citizens Army Training (CAT) gives training in character building, citizenship training, etc., which leads to the creation of a new social order and a new society eventually. What philosophy supports this? 05 a. Existentialism b. Perennialism c. Progressivism d. Social Reconstructionism
  • 42. Let’s Practice a. Behaviorism b. Progressivism c. Existentialism d. Essentialism Mr. Santos says: "If it's Mobile Legend that brings students outside of the classroom, let us bring it to the classroom. Maybe I can use it to teach Math." To which philosophy does Mr. Santos adhere? 06 a. Behaviorism b. Progressivism c. Existentialism d. Essentialism
  • 43. Let’s Practice a. The pragmatist b. The existentialist c. The behaviorist d. The essentialist Who is more likely to advise you to modify your classroom environment in such a way that your students will be motivated to learn? 07 a. The pragmatist b. The existentialist c. The behaviorist d. The essentialist
  • 45. Tailoring of Teacher’s Philosophical Statement "A teaching (philosophy) statement is a purposeful and reflective essay about the author’s teaching beliefs and practices. It is an individual narrative that includes not only one’s beliefs about the teaching and learning process but also concrete examples of the ways in which he or she enacts these beliefs in the classroom.“ (Vanderbilt University) Ohio State University Center for the Advancement Teaching Teaching philosophy statement is important because a clear philosophy of teaching can lead to a change in teaching behavior and foster professional and personal growth.
  • 46. Why make 1. You might be writing it as an exercise in concisely documenting your beliefs so that you can easily articulate them to your students, peers, or a search committee. 2. It might serve as the introduction to your teaching portfolio. 3. Or, it can serve as a means of professional growth as it requires you to give examples of how you enact your philosophy, thus requiring you to consider the degree to which your teaching is congruent with your beliefs.
  • 47. "My philosophy of education is that all children are unique and must have a stimulating educational environment where they can grow physically, mentally, emotionally, and socially. It is my desire to create this type of atmosphere where students can meet their full potential. I will provide a safe environment where students are invited to share their ideas and take risks. "I believe that there are five essential elements that are conducive to learning. (1) The teacher's role is to act as a guide. (2) Students must have access to hands-on activities. (3) Students should be able to have choices and let their curiosity direct their learning. (4) Students need the opportunity to practice skills in a safe environment. (5) Technology must be incorporated into the school day." 01 Example
  • 48. "I believe that all children are unique and have something special that they can bring to their own education. I will assist my students to express themselves and accept themselves for who they are, as well embrace the differences of others. "Every classroom has its own unique community; my role as the teacher will be to assist each child in developing their own potential and learning styles. I will present a curriculum that will incorporate each different learning style, as well as make the content relevant to the students' lives. I will incorporate hands-on learning, cooperative learning, projects, themes, and individual work that engage and activate students learning." 02 Example
  • 49. Guide questions on writing your Philosophical Statement Your concept of learning What do you mean by learning? What happens in a successful learning situation? Your concept of teaching What are your values, beliefs, and aspirations as a teacher? Do you wish to encourage mastery, competency, transformational learning, lifelong learning, general transference of skills, critical thinking? What does a perfect teaching situation look like to you and why? How are the values and beliefs realized in classroom activities? Your goals for students What skills should students obtain as a result of your teaching? Your teaching method What methods will you consider to reach these goals and objectives? What are your beliefs regarding learning theory and specific strategies you would use, such as case studies, group work, simulations, interactive lectures? Your interaction with the students What are you attitudes towards advising and mentoring students? How would an observer see you interact with students? Why do you want to work with students?
  • 50. Guide questions on writing your Philosophical Statement Assessing learning How will you assess student growth and learning? What are your beliefs about grading? Do you grade students on a percentage scale (criterion referenced) or on a curve (norm referenced)? What different types of assessment will you use (i.e. traditional tests, projects, portfolios, presentations) and why? Personal Growth How will you continue growing as a teacher? What goals do you have for yourself and how will you reach them? How have your attitudes towards teaching and learning changed over time? How will you use student evaluations to improve your teaching? How might you learn new skills? How do you know when you've taught effectively?