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Copyright Reaktor 2013 Luottamuksellinen
Case Against Scaling 
Back to basics with your enterprise 
transformation 
Sami Lilja 
Reaktor 
Twitter: @samililja 
Copyr...
How big is big? 
Pick a piece of paper and a pen. 
Think about software / IT projects you 
have been working on. 
Based on...
Copyright Reaktor 2014 
The Beef
Solving the wrong problem 
Source: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/806573 
Copyright Reaktor 2014
Finding the right question 
The way we formulate the problem, 
limits our space of potential solutions 
Meetings take too ...
Scaling Agile? 
The problem is not that we lack ways 
to scale Agile. 
The problem is not that we fail with 
Agile in larg...
Copyright Reaktor 2014 
Economy of Scale 
Scalability 
Size 
Cost of 
overhead 
Sublinear = Scales well 
Highly repeatable...
Labor-intensive work 
Copyright Reaktor 2014
Knowledge work? 
Copyright Reaktor 2014
When doing knowledge work in 
Large Scale, the key question is 
not “How?” – it is “Why?” 
Copyright Reaktor 2014
Copyright Reaktor 2014
Organizations getting bigger 
Copyright Reaktor 2014
Pear-shape organizations 
Copyright Reaktor 2014
But, hey.. 
• Do you say companies should not grow? 
– No, I am not saying that 
• Do you say companies should only do 
sm...
What makes us Big? 
Large organization or 
project 
Fear of 
transparency 
Copyright Reaktor 2014 
“We need lot of 
differ...
The root of all Evil I 
Work-in-Progress 
Copyright Reaktor 2014
Work-in-Progress 
• How many things your organization is 
currently working on? 
• How easy it is to get dedicated people ...
Hey, but.. 
• Work-in-Progress and Little’s Law are 
about time through system 
• What does this have to do with project 
...
Work in Progress 
• Most organizations have too many 
things going on at one time, because 
– People are costly: Fear of <...
Work in Progress 
• We underestimate the overhead that 
Work-in-Progress causes 
• In reality, large WIP causes huge and 
...
Sami’s Test #1 
• Think about predictable demand that 
comes to your organization 
– Support request, creating a new servi...
Quick review 
• Pick a person near you, form pairs or 
triplets 
• In your small group, have a 2 minutes 
discussion about...
The root of all Evil II 
Failure Demand 
Copyright Reaktor 2014
Value demand 
Adds value from customer 
point of view. 
Something customers are 
willing to pay for. 
This type of demand ...
All demand is considered work 
Source: http://www.limebridge.com.au/page/Learning_Centre/Cartoons/ 
Copyright Reaktor 2014
Failure demand: Not only bugs 
NEW IT SYSTEM! 
Copyright Reaktor 2014 
Value 
for 
user 
Fail 
CU 
ST 
O 
M 
E 
R 
S 
UP 
...
Internal Failure demand 
Do we need this 
process? 
What thinking 
created this? 
Copyright Reaktor 2014
Hidden Failure demand 
Copyright Reaktor 2014 
Value Demand 
(Project work) 
Failure Demand 
(Bug fixes etc) 
Other 
The P...
Copyright Reaktor 2014 
Dysfunction 
Something in the design and 
management of work that is 
causing problems.
Institutionalized Dysfunction 
Problem that is resolved by adding 
processes or management actions 
and then focusing on a...
Institutionalized Dysfunction 
and Agile Manifesto 
We are uncovering better ways of developing 
software by doing it and ...
Sami’s Test #2 
• Assume you could freely choose the 
smallest possible number of people to 
implement the product or serv...
Quick review 
• Pick a person near you, form pairs or 
triplets 
• In your small group, have a 2 minutes 
discussion about...
THE WAY OUT? 
Copyright Reaktor 2014
What makes us Big? 
Large organization or 
project 
None of these are Laws of Nature. 
None of these are imposed on you. 
...
Putting things in perspective 
• Up to 80% of work in organization is Failure 
Demand 
– What if you could reduce it, just...
Copyright Reaktor 2014 
Size 
Cost of 
overhead 
Sublinear = Scales well 
Reducing project size by 
X% decreases costs by ...
Copyright Reaktor 2014 
But hey, … 
• “You are overreacting. We all know 
large scale may not be the best 
solution. But i...
It is not perfect but it works 
If it works, don’t fix it 
- American Car manufacturers, 1970s 
Copyright Reaktor 2014
Sami’s Test #3 
• OK, let’s assume you’ve done everything to 
limit WIP, remove failure demand and reduce 
complexity 
• S...
SCRUM AT LARGE SCALE 
Copyright Reaktor 2014
What is missing from 
this picture? 
I can not see the 
customer here.. 
Copyright Reaktor 2014
What is missing from 
this statement? 
What if the demand 
comes from end user? 
What if we are 
creating a service? 
Copy...
Asking the right question 
• “How can I make Scrum work in my 
organization and my projects” 
– Coaching, Teaching, Inspec...
Forgetting customer 
• Forgetting customer may lead to tunnel 
vision 
– Creating backlogs for teams rather than for 
cust...
Copyright Reaktor 2014 
Customers, 
users 
Customers, 
users 
Demand 
Demand 
Value for 
customers 
and users 
Value for 
...
BEYOND SCRUM: " 
SOLID FRAMEWORK" 
" 
HTTP://SOLID.REAKTOR.FI 
Copyright Reaktor 2014
• Three different levels and 
frames for thinking 
– Note: These boxes are not 
separate organizations 
• Purpose of Solid...
Operational Level looks at value delivery 
flow in order to maximize the Return on 
Investment. 
Thinking frames 
• True A...
Summary 
• Attempts to do knowledge work in large 
scale are likely to fail 
– …or at least suboptimal way to create produ...
solving the right problem? 
We are engineers. 
We are trained to 
solve problems. 
Copyright Reaktor 2014
Ways to deal with a problem 
Dissolution: redesign the system or its environment 
in such a way that it eliminates the pro...
Dissolution: redesign the system or its environment 
in such a way that it eliminates the problem or the 
conditions that ...
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Case Against Scaling (Scrum Gathering Berlin)

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Slides from my session in Scrum Gathering Berlin, Sep 23 2014.

Case Against Scaling (Scrum Gathering Berlin)

  1. 1. Copyright Reaktor 2013 Luottamuksellinen
  2. 2. Case Against Scaling Back to basics with your enterprise transformation Sami Lilja Reaktor Twitter: @samililja Copyright Reaktor 2014
  3. 3. How big is big? Pick a piece of paper and a pen. Think about software / IT projects you have been working on. Based on your experience fill in the blank: A project is a big project when it has more than ___ people working on it. Copyright Reaktor 2014
  4. 4. Copyright Reaktor 2014 The Beef
  5. 5. Solving the wrong problem Source: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/806573 Copyright Reaktor 2014
  6. 6. Finding the right question The way we formulate the problem, limits our space of potential solutions Meetings take too much time People lack motivation Work environment, the system, Copyright Reaktor 2014 vs. We have too many meetings vs. decreases motivation Coordinating between parallel projects is not effective vs. We have too many parallel projects
  7. 7. Scaling Agile? The problem is not that we lack ways to scale Agile. The problem is not that we fail with Agile in large organizations. The problem is that we are large. Size does matter. Copyright Reaktor 2014
  8. 8. Copyright Reaktor 2014 Economy of Scale Scalability Size Cost of overhead Sublinear = Scales well Highly repeatable “How many?”
  9. 9. Labor-intensive work Copyright Reaktor 2014
  10. 10. Knowledge work? Copyright Reaktor 2014
  11. 11. When doing knowledge work in Large Scale, the key question is not “How?” – it is “Why?” Copyright Reaktor 2014
  12. 12. Copyright Reaktor 2014
  13. 13. Organizations getting bigger Copyright Reaktor 2014
  14. 14. Pear-shape organizations Copyright Reaktor 2014
  15. 15. But, hey.. • Do you say companies should not grow? – No, I am not saying that • Do you say companies should only do small things? – No, I am not saying that – But.. small batches are better than large batches • Are you against the frameworks that promise Agility in large-scale? – No, I am against doing large-scale development – However, the frameworks take “large scale” as given and do very little to reduce that Copyright Reaktor 2014
  16. 16. What makes us Big? Large organization or project Fear of transparency Copyright Reaktor 2014 “We need lot of different competences” “Relative overhead is smaller” Complex systems Separating action, feedback, knowledge and decision making “Adding more people will speed us up” Big projects need lot of people need big projects need … Silos in organization (Conways’s Law) Lot of unfinished work (WIP) Belief in Economies of Scale Failure Demand Short-term (Project) thinking
  17. 17. The root of all Evil I Work-in-Progress Copyright Reaktor 2014
  18. 18. Work-in-Progress • How many things your organization is currently working on? • How easy it is to get dedicated people / team to deliver customer value? Copyright Reaktor 2014
  19. 19. Hey, but.. • Work-in-Progress and Little’s Law are about time through system • What does this have to do with project size? • Large amount of WIP helps to create unnecessarily large projects – When time-through-system gets long, some organizations add more people to gain speed – People are split to work on many parallel projects. Getting X people worth of work takes 10x more people Copyright Reaktor 2014
  20. 20. Work in Progress • Most organizations have too many things going on at one time, because – People are costly: Fear of <100% resource utilization – It is easier to start things than complete things – Large projects require lot of people require large projects require lot of people.. Copyright Reaktor 2014
  21. 21. Work in Progress • We underestimate the overhead that Work-in-Progress causes • In reality, large WIP causes huge and costly problems Copyright Reaktor 2014 – Delays • time-through-system = Work-In-Progress / Velocity – Queues and synchronization problems – Internal Failure Demand • Meetings, coordination effort, waiting, re-work, …
  22. 22. Sami’s Test #1 • Think about predictable demand that comes to your organization – Support request, creating a new service, ramp-up of a project, fixing a bug, … • What would be the fastest completion time for such work in your system, if you could do anything to make it happen? • If your current performance is lower, why is that? What causes delays? Copyright Reaktor 2014
  23. 23. Quick review • Pick a person near you, form pairs or triplets • In your small group, have a 2 minutes discussion about – What topics have been covered so far? – How do you feel about these topics? – What concepts have been significant to you? – How could you use these in your work? Copyright Reaktor 2014
  24. 24. The root of all Evil II Failure Demand Copyright Reaktor 2014
  25. 25. Value demand Adds value from customer point of view. Something customers are willing to pay for. This type of demand we want. Copyright Reaktor 2014 Failure demand Failure to do what customer needs Bad quality, wrong product or service, delay. No product or service. Missing either what or how customer wants Can account up to 80% of work
  26. 26. All demand is considered work Source: http://www.limebridge.com.au/page/Learning_Centre/Cartoons/ Copyright Reaktor 2014
  27. 27. Failure demand: Not only bugs NEW IT SYSTEM! Copyright Reaktor 2014 Value for user Fail CU ST O M E R S UP P O R T “PRESS 1 IF YOU CALL ABOUT..” “PRESS 2 IF YOU CALL ABOUT..” “PRESS 3 IF YOU CALL ABOUT..”
  28. 28. Internal Failure demand Do we need this process? What thinking created this? Copyright Reaktor 2014
  29. 29. Hidden Failure demand Copyright Reaktor 2014 Value Demand (Project work) Failure Demand (Bug fixes etc) Other The Plan Value Demand (Project work) Failure Demand (Bug fixes, meetings, waiting, coordination) Other The reality
  30. 30. Copyright Reaktor 2014 Dysfunction Something in the design and management of work that is causing problems.
  31. 31. Institutionalized Dysfunction Problem that is resolved by adding processes or management actions and then focusing on actions rather than the original problem. Copyright Reaktor 2014
  32. 32. Institutionalized Dysfunction and Agile Manifesto We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value: Individuals and interactions over processes and tools Working software over comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Responding to change over following a plan That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more. Copyright Reaktor 2014 Slippery slope to institutionalized dysfunction
  33. 33. Sami’s Test #2 • Assume you could freely choose the smallest possible number of people to implement the product or service. • How large would that group be? • If such group is significantly smaller than your current development project, why is that? Copyright Reaktor 2014
  34. 34. Quick review • Pick a person near you, form pairs or triplets • In your small group, have a 2 minutes discussion about – What topics and issues have been covered so far? – How do you feel about these topics? – What topics or concepts have been significant to you? – How could you use new learning in your work? Copyright Reaktor 2014
  35. 35. THE WAY OUT? Copyright Reaktor 2014
  36. 36. What makes us Big? Large organization or project None of these are Laws of Nature. None of these are imposed on you. Fear of transparency Copyright Reaktor 2014 “We need lot of different competences” “Relative overhead is smaller” Complex systems Separating action, feedback, knowledge and decision making “Adding more people will speed us up” Big projects need lot of people need big projects need … Silos in organization (Conways’s Law) Lot of unfinished work (WIP) Belief in Economies of Scale Failure Demand Short-term (Project) thinking These are the results of thinking. And we can get rid of these if we want.
  37. 37. Putting things in perspective • Up to 80% of work in organization is Failure Demand – What if you could reduce it, just a little bit? • Significant amount of work in project is caused by large amount of WIP – What if that improves as well? • Keep in mind the pear-shape organization and super-linear cost of scaling… Copyright Reaktor 2014
  38. 38. Copyright Reaktor 2014 Size Cost of overhead Sublinear = Scales well Reducing project size by X% decreases costs by a lot more than X% X%
  39. 39. Copyright Reaktor 2014 But hey, … • “You are overreacting. We all know large scale may not be the best solution. But it is usually unavoidable. And it works”
  40. 40. It is not perfect but it works If it works, don’t fix it - American Car manufacturers, 1970s Copyright Reaktor 2014
  41. 41. Sami’s Test #3 • OK, let’s assume you’ve done everything to limit WIP, remove failure demand and reduce complexity • Still your project is Large(-ish) .. At least 3x bigger than “by-the-book” Agile project • Doing things in large scale is the only option. And you want to do it Agile. • Have you done a very successful small end-to-end Agile project before attempting a large scale Agile project? Copyright Reaktor 2014
  42. 42. SCRUM AT LARGE SCALE Copyright Reaktor 2014
  43. 43. What is missing from this picture? I can not see the customer here.. Copyright Reaktor 2014
  44. 44. What is missing from this statement? What if the demand comes from end user? What if we are creating a service? Copyright Reaktor 2014
  45. 45. Asking the right question • “How can I make Scrum work in my organization and my projects” – Coaching, Teaching, Inspect and Adapt • “How can I fulfill value demand from customer using Scrum” – Coaching, Teaching, Inspect & Adapt, … – Study and understand demand – Design and manage work against Value Demand! Copyright Reaktor 2014
  46. 46. Forgetting customer • Forgetting customer may lead to tunnel vision – Creating backlogs for teams rather than for customer need – Having unnecessary dependencies between teams (and product owners) – Internal failure demand: synchronization, prioritization, waiting – Lack of purpose: Backlog represent “work” instead of “Customer need” Copyright Reaktor 2014
  47. 47. Copyright Reaktor 2014 Customers, users Customers, users Demand Demand Value for customers and users Value for customers and users
  48. 48. BEYOND SCRUM: " SOLID FRAMEWORK" " HTTP://SOLID.REAKTOR.FI Copyright Reaktor 2014
  49. 49. • Three different levels and frames for thinking – Note: These boxes are not separate organizations • Purpose of Solid: Help organizations design and manage work so that value demand from customer is fulfilled • Solid helps organizations to find the right questions Copyright Reaktor 2014
  50. 50. Operational Level looks at value delivery flow in order to maximize the Return on Investment. Thinking frames • True Agility • Kanban, Scrum, XP Tactical Level aims to find the right products and services. It also provides tools to manage investment (project) portfolio. Thinking frames • Customer development & Lean startup • Data science Strategic Level provides understanding about markets and customer needs. It helps to design workflow and value delivery system. Thinking frames • Systems Thinking • Outside-in perspective Copyright Reaktor 2014
  51. 51. Summary • Attempts to do knowledge work in large scale are likely to fail – …or at least suboptimal way to create products and services • Main reasons for being large – Lot of parallel work-in-progress – Inability to see and remove failure demand – Fear of fast feedback and transparency • Large Scale is a System Condition • In order to change System Conditions, we need new thinking – We need to find better questions, not just good answers Copyright Reaktor 2014
  52. 52. solving the right problem? We are engineers. We are trained to solve problems. Copyright Reaktor 2014
  53. 53. Ways to deal with a problem Dissolution: redesign the system or its environment in such a way that it eliminates the problem or the conditions that caused it solution: discover or create behavior that yields the best, or approximately the best, possible outcome, one that "optimizes" the situation. Resolution: employ behavior previously used in similar situations, adapted if necessary, so as to obtain an outcome that is good enough. Absolution: ignore a problem and hope it will solve itself or go away of its own accord. http://results2match.com/ackoff-again-4-different-ways-of-solving-a-problem Copyright Reaktor 2014
  54. 54. Dissolution: redesign the system or its environment in such a way that it eliminates the problem or the conditions that caused it Copyright Reaktor 2014

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