The Role of Music in Japanese Language Curriculum  A follow-up of the workshop titled “Voices Across the Disciplines” Pres...
Preface: Characteristics of Learners (K-16) and Types of Japanese Language Programs <ul><li>Learner levels and types of la...
Objectives of Music/song Integration  in the Japanese Curriculum   <ul><li>To a varied degree and as an objective, every f...
Cultural Component Japanese music as a small unit <ul><li>Traditional versus Contemporary Music . </li></ul><ul><li>The te...
(Secondary School)   Example of A Mini Lesson Plan for  Japanese Traditional Music  - <ul><li>Sample lessons:  </li></ul><...
Example of a Lesson Plan for  Traditional Music  (2) <ul><li>While students are working on the daily warm-up  language exe...
Example of a  Lesson plan for  Japanese Traditional Music --Assessment( 3 ) <ul><li>A simple assessment shall be added in ...
Example of a Lesson Plan for  Japanese Traditional Music --Assessment (4 ) <ul><li>Assessment example: </li></ul><ul><li>H...
Another Example of a Lesson plan for  Japanese Traditional Music ( 5) <ul><li>When a student shows his/her interest in a p...
Rationale which supports this mini music unit <ul><li>One statement of our Belief Statements of the Shaler Area School Dis...
ACTFL 5 Cs Culture Defined in ACTFL National Standards  Culture is one of  the 5 Cs.  <ul><li>Communication </li></ul><ul>...
ACTFL National Standards  -- Culture <ul><li>Standard 2.1 - Students demonstrate an understanding of  the relationship of ...
Music in the Framework of the ACTFL 5 Cs <ul><li>A.  Communication---  students may develop dialogues in the topic of musi...
Community --for Linking Music with Japanese Geography
Music  and Geography (in the Framework of the ACTFL Community Various locations on the map are tied to a variety  of folks...
Music as a Strategy to Enjoy, Retain, and to be a Cue in Grammar for Language Teaching/Learning (1) <ul><li>Most teachers ...
Music as Enjoyment and a  Teaching Strategy (2) <ul><li>There is no hierarchical order  as to which song to introduce firs...
Specific to Japanese language Selection Samples of Songs according to  a set of objectives   <ul><li>Te-form  むすんで、開いて 、 <...
Bibliography <ul><li>Planning For and Using the New National Culture Standards, by Dale Lange, Foreign Language Standards:...
Bibliography <ul><li>Music of Japan , Our Musical Heritage Series, ISBN 1-55784-026-1 (video tape) </li></ul><ul><li>Philo...
The End Thank you
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Music In Japanese Lang. Curriculum

1,267 views

Published on

a sample how Jap. music can be integrated in Jap. lang. curriculum

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,267
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
10
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Music In Japanese Lang. Curriculum

  1. 1. The Role of Music in Japanese Language Curriculum A follow-up of the workshop titled “Voices Across the Disciplines” Presented on March 10, 2004 By Ritsu Shimizu
  2. 2. Preface: Characteristics of Learners (K-16) and Types of Japanese Language Programs <ul><li>Learner levels and types of language programs override the form and the extent of the integration of music(songs) in the language curriculum. In spite of these differences, music (song) introduction has been considered and practiced as part of the culture introduction and also as an effective strategy to supplement, enhance and enrich the learners’ understanding of the language and culture . </li></ul>
  3. 3. Objectives of Music/song Integration in the Japanese Curriculum <ul><li>To a varied degree and as an objective, every foreign language teacher has been using music for the purposes of : </li></ul><ul><li>introducing culture </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>As an independent ethnic music (a small unit lesson) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>As part of the integrated language instruction in ACTFL 5 Cs. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Enhancing language teaching/learning (vocabulary, sentence structures, and grammatical conjugations) as a strategy and for the learner’s enjoyment. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Cultural Component Japanese music as a small unit <ul><li>Traditional versus Contemporary Music . </li></ul><ul><li>The teacher’s background and the type of the language program limit the music introduction. Modern vs. traditional music is one way to simplify. </li></ul><ul><li>Here is an example of traditional music introduction. </li></ul><ul><li>The Objectives: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To introduce how to play a taiko (drum)--hands-on, watching a video , etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To introduce koto/syakuhachi/syamisen music by inviting a professional player to school, or attending a performance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>to familialize and identify the characteristics of sounds by matching with a specific instrument. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. (Secondary School) Example of A Mini Lesson Plan for Japanese Traditional Music - <ul><li>Sample lessons: </li></ul><ul><li>First teacher introduces the traditional music via video tape. For examples, Music of Japan (See the bibliography) </li></ul><ul><li>By watching the video, students will be able to see the musical instrument and can hear the sounds of the music that each instrument produces. </li></ul><ul><li>Then the following week, the teacher can play a CD or a cassette tape of a particular instrumental music at the beginning of the class as background music while students get ready for class for several minutes each day for a week or so. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Example of a Lesson Plan for Traditional Music (2) <ul><li>While students are working on the daily warm-up language exercise for 5 to 8 minutes, this background music shall provide them with a familiarity of Japanese musical sounds. </li></ul><ul><li>After, their warm-up exercise is over, the class will begin by calling the student’s attention to the music which the teacher has planned for them to hear. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Example of a Lesson plan for Japanese Traditional Music --Assessment( 3 ) <ul><li>A simple assessment shall be added in the language lesson unit. </li></ul><ul><li>The assessments can be given as multiple choice, or matching musical sounds with a musical instrument. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Example of a Lesson Plan for Japanese Traditional Music --Assessment (4 ) <ul><li>Assessment example: </li></ul><ul><li>Hearing a piece of music which has just been played, students choose the appropriate musical instrument which was used. </li></ul><ul><li>Match the sounds with the instrument. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Syakuhachi </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Koto </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Syamisen </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>taiko </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Another Example of a Lesson plan for Japanese Traditional Music ( 5) <ul><li>When a student shows his/her interest in a particular music, assign him/her to do a research work about the instrument’s history, how it is played, who played it, and where it is played. (this is not a required task for all students. ) The purpose is to encourage their cultural exploration and to satisfy and foster their aesthetic interest. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Rationale which supports this mini music unit <ul><li>One statement of our Belief Statements of the Shaler Area School District Foreign Language Curriculum (1999) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Expose students to new ideas that will expand their aesthetic, cultural and career horizons. “ (the Japanese music introduction will serve the student’s education) </li></ul>
  11. 11. ACTFL 5 Cs Culture Defined in ACTFL National Standards Culture is one of the 5 Cs. <ul><li>Communication </li></ul><ul><li>Culture </li></ul><ul><li>Connections </li></ul><ul><li>D. Comparison </li></ul><ul><li>E. Community </li></ul><ul><li>In these 5 Cs, culture is one component and is interrelated with other components </li></ul><ul><li>There are 11 standards for language learners in these five goal areas. </li></ul><ul><li>Culture related standards are three or four depending on each teacher’s focus and priority </li></ul>
  12. 12. ACTFL National Standards -- Culture <ul><li>Standard 2.1 - Students demonstrate an understanding of the relationship of the practices and perspective of the culture studied. </li></ul><ul><li>Standard 2.2 - Students demonstrate an understanding of the relationship of the products and perspectives of the culture studies . </li></ul>
  13. 13. Music in the Framework of the ACTFL 5 Cs <ul><li>A. Communication--- students may develop dialogues in the topic of music. どんな音楽がすきですか  </li></ul><ul><li>Culture-- Are all the young Japanese listening to the koto and syakuihachi music? What kind of music do young Japanese like to listen to? </li></ul><ul><li>Connections-- Is there any American and Japanese music interaction? Do the Japanese make their own rap songs? Is there any Japanese music sung or listened to by American audiences? </li></ul><ul><li>D. Comparison-- What are typical American musical instruments? Banjo? Is there a similar instrument to the banjo in Japan? </li></ul><ul><li>E. Community -- the origin of a musical instrument or a performance in a particular region can be tied to the instruction of Japanese geography and history. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Community --for Linking Music with Japanese Geography
  15. 15. Music and Geography (in the Framework of the ACTFL Community Various locations on the map are tied to a variety of folksongs, instrumental music and festivals
  16. 16. Music as a Strategy to Enjoy, Retain, and to be a Cue in Grammar for Language Teaching/Learning (1) <ul><li>Most teachers adopt songs for the purpose of the learner’s enjoyment of language learning. There is, however, language teaching beneath certain kinds of a sentence structures, phrases, counters, and can be a cue for a correct verb conjugation etc. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Music as Enjoyment and a Teaching Strategy (2) <ul><li>There is no hierarchical order as to which song to introduce first. </li></ul><ul><li>Selections of songs are based on a combination of the lesson’s focus, the teacher’s familiarity of a particular song, and being appropriate for the learner’s age. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Specific to Japanese language Selection Samples of Songs according to a set of objectives <ul><li>Te-form むすんで、開いて 、 </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>みなさん、みなさん、てフォーム を覚えましょ </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Counter インデアンのおじいさん </li></ul><ul><li> 鉛筆が一本 </li></ul><ul><li>Color 赤いとり小鳥、咲いた “ チュウリップのはながーー </li></ul><ul><li>Onomatopoeia   the old MacDonald Farm </li></ul><ul><li> 村祭り </li></ul><ul><li> 花火 </li></ul><ul><li>Sentence Structure は   です ( 今日は あかちゃん ) </li></ul>
  19. 19. Bibliography <ul><li>Planning For and Using the New National Culture Standards, by Dale Lange, Foreign Language Standards: Linking Research, theories, and practice, edited by June K. Phillips, National Textbook Company, 1999. (pp.57-120) </li></ul><ul><li>Thematic Unit on Wellness, page 17, Journal of ________, by National Foreign Language Resource Center, Iowa State, 1998 </li></ul>
  20. 20. Bibliography <ul><li>Music of Japan , Our Musical Heritage Series, ISBN 1-55784-026-1 (video tape) </li></ul><ul><li>Philosophy and Belief Statements of Shaler Area School District Foreign Language Program, February, 1999. Directed by the Assistant Superintendent, Mr. Bradley Ferko </li></ul><ul><li>World of Music: An Introductory of the Music of the World’s People. Jeff Todd Titon. Publisher: Schirmer Thomas Learning. (Japanese Section written by Linda Fujii.) </li></ul>
  21. 21. The End Thank you

×