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Family Scouting Presentation – Scout Me In

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Slides + Extra Info from the National Capital Area Council Family Scouting Webinar. This information is accurate as of May 21, 2018. For the most recent information visit http://scouting.org/familyscouting/

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Family Scouting Presentation – Scout Me In

  1. 1. An Introduction to Family Scouting National Capital Area Council
  2. 2. An Introduction to Family Scouting May 15, 2018
  3. 3. Agenda • What is Family Scouting? • How Does Family Scouting Work? • Youth Protection Requirements • How To Get Started • Program • Scout Shop
  4. 4. We Want to Hear from You!
  5. 5. Email: Family@NCACBSA.org
  6. 6. YouTube Event Page: http://bit.ly/NCACFamily2 Your questions go here Our experts will answer
  7. 7. Our Panelists
  8. 8. Chris Lucander • NCAC Vice President of Membership • Eagle Scout • Wood Badge • Brotherhood Member Order of the Arrow • Advisor Crew 343 Washington DC
  9. 9. Stephanie Herrera • NCAC Family Scouting Champion • NCAC Executive Board Member • Director of Scholarship Program and Founding Executive Director of the Hispanic IT Executive Council (HITEC) Foundation • 30 years experience in business, youth leadership and development
  10. 10. Aaron Chusid • NCAC Chief Communications Officer • Family Scouting Staff Advisor • 20+ years camp staff • Contributing Writer, Game Design Merit Badge Pamphlet
  11. 11. Guest Experts • Danielle Ballentine — Training Committee Assistant Chair • Christine McDanal — Council Lions Champion • Laura Herbig — Council Venturing Officers Association • Philip Barbash — NCAC Director of Camping Services • Jim Wilson — National Youth Protection Committee Chair • Jeff Seymour — Assistant Council Commissioner, Baltimore Area Council • Jenna Fernandez-Ourand — Store Manager, National Capital Scout Shop • Lisa Merlotti – Scout Shop Territory Sales Manager
  12. 12. What is Family Scouting?
  13. 13. Has Family Scouting Worked?
  14. 14. Is Our Name Changing?
  15. 15. Cub Scouts Ages 5–10 Cub Scouts is a year-round program whose mission is to develop character and ethical decision making skills for children in kindergarten through fifth grades (6 to 10 years old). Scouts Ages 11–17 Scouts is a year-round program designed to build character, citizenship, and personal fitness through a vigorous outdoor program and peer group leadership with the counsel of an adult Scoutmaster.
  16. 16. Venturing Ages 14–20 Venturing is a co-ed youth- development program of the BSA that provides positive experiences to help young people mature and to prepare them to become responsible and caring adults. Sea Scouts Ages 14–20 Sea Scouting is a co-ed youth- development program of the BSA that has promoted better citizenship and improved members’ boating skills through instruction and practice in water safety, boating skills, outdoor, social, service experiences, and knowledge of our maritime heritage.
  17. 17. Exploring Ages 14–20 Exploring is a co-ed youth-development program of the BSA that teaches important life and career skills to young people from all backgrounds through immersive career experiences and mentorship provided by community and business leaders.. STEM Scouts Grades 3–12 STEM Scouts is a co-ed youth- development program of the BSA that harnesses young people’s passion for technology and learning to teach them new skills in a fun, interactive environment. STEM Scouts work with STEM professionals and conduct experiments.
  18. 18. How Does Family Scouting Work in Cub Scouts?
  19. 19. What’s New with Lions?
  20. 20. How Does Family Scouting Work with Scouts BSA?
  21. 21. What are Youth Protection Requirments?
  22. 22. On Council Homepage
  23. 23. Updated Youth Protection Training • The New Youth Protection Training • includes insights from experts and survivors • includes the latest strategies for recognizing and preventing major forms of abuse • This is the designated Youth Protection Training for all adults before registration. • All current volunteers must take the new training by October 1, 2018, no matter when they took the previous training.
  24. 24. Updated Youth Protection Training • An expanded ScoutsFirst Helpline to aid volunteers and families in addressing potentially dangerous situations • Unlimited counseling and support for healing to anyone who has ever been abused in Scouting • Youth Protection Training for youth members available in 2019
  25. 25. Youth Protection Training Requirements • As of January 1, 2018, no new leader can be registered without first completing youth protection training. (Many councils have required this training before registration for many years) • As of January 1, 2018, no council, regional, or national leader will be allowed to renew their registration if they are not current on their Youth Protection Training.
  26. 26. • As of September 1, 2017, no unit may re- charter without all leaders being current on their Youth Protection Training. Registrars no longer have the ability to approve charters without full compliance. • Effective June 1, 2018, adults accompanying a Scouting unit who are present at the activity for 72 total hours or more must be registered as a leader, including completion of a criminal background check and Youth Protection Training. The 72 hours need not be consecutive. Youth Protection Training Requirements
  27. 27. What Should Leaders Know About Training?
  28. 28. Cub Scout Leadership Requirement Changes • In an overwhelming number of existing packs, girls have already informally been participating in activities, including pack meetings and family camping, so the BSA doesn’t foresee major issues in welcoming girls officially to packs. • Because the program itself is not changing, your unit commissioner would be the most knowledgeable person to talk to about the Scouting program. Your district executive is also a resource.
  29. 29. Scouting Leadership Requirement Changes • Scoutmaster • The Scoutmaster is still responsible for training and guiding youth leaders in the operation of the troop and for managing, training and supporting assistant scoutmasters in their role. • Chartered organizations should have separate Scoutmasters for their boy troop and girl troop.
  30. 30. Scouting Leadership Requirement Changes • Assistant Scoutmasters • Adult leadership may be men, women, or both men and women together. • All youth protection guidelines are to be in use no matter the make-up of the adult leadership. • Troop Committee • A chartered organization can decide if they want the same or separate committee.
  31. 31. http://bit.ly/BeAScoutPin
  32. 32. General Timeline
  33. 33. What Changes?
  34. 34. MEMBERSHIP FINANCE GOVERNANCE / ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM UNIT SERVICE NATIONAL ITEMS MISSION • VISION • OATH • LAW • AIMS/METHODS
  35. 35. FEMALE MEMBERSHIP 2018 PACKS 2019 TROOPS PACK STRUCTURE PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS FOR FAMILY PACKS NEW CHARTERED PARTNER RELATIONSHIP TOTAL AVAILABLE YOUTH YOUTH APPLICATION REGISTRATION FEES ADULT LEADERSHIP POSITIONS YOUTH LEADERSHIP POSITIONS MEMBERSHIP POTENTIAL CHANGE NO CHANGE
  36. 36. FINANCE POTENTIAL CHANGE NO CHANGE UNITED WAY RELATIONSHIPS NEW PROSPECTS BLACKBAUD FAMILY FRIENDS OF SCOUTING SPECIAL EVENTS PRODUCTS SALES
  37. 37. GOVERNANCE / ADMINISTRATION POTENTIAL CHANGE NO CHANGE DISTRICT LEADERSHIP DIVERSITY Websites updated with girl images and gender neutral language NATIONAL SUPPLY UNIFORM OPTIONS BOARD DIVERSITY BeAScout, My.Scouting, Scoutbook, Scouting.org COUNCIL BY-LAWS RISK MANAGEMENT NATIONAL ANNUAL MEETING JOURNEY TO EXCELLENCE COUNCIL & DISTRICT STRUCTURE PROFESSIONAL PERFORMANCE GUIDE TO SAFE SCOUTING
  38. 38. PROGRAM POTENTIAL CHANGE NO CHANGE xxc ran DEN CHIEFS UPDATING TRAINING MODULES FOR GENDER ORDER OF THE ARROW YOUTH PROTECTION TRAINING HANDBOOK & LEADER MATERIALS FOR GENDER ADVANCEMENT TRAINING REQUIREMENTS NATIONAL CAMPING STANDARDS TENTING & SHOWER POLICY COUNCIL & DISTRICT STRUCTURE HIGH ADVENTURE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
  39. 39. UNIT SERVICE POTENTIAL CHANGE NO CHANGE COMMISSIONER STAFF STRUCTURE ROUNDTABLES COMMISSIONER COLLEGE
  40. 40. NATIONAL ITEMS POTENTIAL CHANGE NO CHANGE MEMBER CAREBOYS’ LIFE MAGAZINE
  41. 41. Next Steps
  42. 42. Ask Questions email Family@NCACBSA.org
  43. 43. Sign Up for More Information https://www.ncacbsa.org/familyscouting/
  44. 44. All Official Updates https://www.scouting.org/familyscouting/
  45. 45. Start the Conversation Unit Level + Chartered Organization | District Level
  46. 46. Your Unit and Family Scouting • Growth Mindset • Unit Size Comfort Zone • Culture Addition • Embrace New Members
  47. 47. http://bit.ly/bsatownhall
  48. 48. An Introduction to Family Scouting National Capital Area Council
  49. 49. Why is the BSA Adding this Program?
  50. 50. Why is the BSA adding this program? • Families today are busier than ever and with less free time, families want convenience. • In fact, convenience beats cost as the #1 concern. • Research shows that our programs are extremely appealing to today’s busy families.
  51. 51. Why is the BSA adding this program? • In a recent survey of parents not involved with Scouting... • 90% are interested in a program like Cub Scouts for their daughters • 87% are interested in a program like Boy Scouts for their daughters
  52. 52. Why are you just now allowing girls into the Boy Scouts? • The BSA’s decision to welcome girls into the Cub Scout program and to offer a program for older girls comes from input we have received from our Scouting families, as well as prospective Scouting families. • We understand that families today are busier and more diverse than ever. • The BSA believes we owe it to families to structure our program offerings in a way that fits into their busy lives to deliver character development and values-based leadership training that Scouting promises.
  53. 53. The BSA has provided programming to young women and young men for many years Young Women % of membership Young Men % of membership STEM Scouts 45% 55% Exploring 39% 61% Venturing 23% 77% Sea Scouts 40% 60%
  54. 54. What’s New with Lions? • Now a full part of the program • Great way to get families engaged in Scouting at an age when boys and girls are excited about exploring their world • Can’t go to day camp, but start inviting interested families to visit your pack now
  55. 55. Cub Scout Data
  56. 56. 17% 31%35% Parents of Daughters: Parents are not currently involved in Scouting 2017 Family Scouting Receptivity Study | Research & Strategy Likelihood of parents to get sons involved in Cub Scouts 88% Likely How likely would you be to get your daughter(s) and son(s) age 5-10 involved in the program as described above? Extremely likely/interested Very likely/interested Somewhat likely/interested 25% 28% 37% Likelihood of parents to get daughters involved in Cub Scouts 90% Likely
  57. 57. Parents of Daughters: Parents are currently involved in Scouting 2017 Family Scouting Receptivity Study | Research & Strategy How interested would you be in the Cub Scout program for your daughter if offered by Boy Scouts of America? Extremely likely/interested Very likely/interested Somewhat likely/interested 29% 19%27% Interest in Cub Scout Program for daughter 68% Likely
  58. 58. Three-quarters of unit leaders and those who have earned their Eagle Scout award are extremely or somewhat interested in the Cub Scout program for their daughter. 2017 Family Scouting Receptivity Study | Research & Strategy Unit leaders (Cubmasters, Den leaders, Scoutmasters) n=5,079 How interested would you be in the Cub Scout program for your daughter if offered by Boy Scouts of America? Extremely likely/interested Somewhat interested NESA n=1,088 44% 32% 41% 33% 74% Interested 76% Interested
  59. 59. 31% 17%24% 11% 17%Completely favorable Very favorable Somewhat favorable Not too favorable Not at all favorable Opinion About Adding Cub Scout Options 2017 Family Scouting Receptivity Study | Research & Strategy How do you feel about the BSA offering these options? Council Constituents n=8,700 73% Favorable
  60. 60. Boy Scout Data
  61. 61. 22% 34% 32% Parents of daughters aged 11-18 who do not currently have a child in the Boy Scout program indicate a high likelihood of joining. 2017 Family Scouting Receptivity Study | Research & Strategy Parents of girls n=550 87% Likely How likely would you be to get your son(s) and daughter(s) age 11-16 involved in the program as described above? Extremely likely/interested Very likely/interested Somewhat likely/interested 31% 27% 26% Parents of boys n=129 84% Likely
  62. 62. Girls age 11 -16 also indicate a high likelihood of joining. 2017 Family Scouting Receptivity Study | Research & Strategy How likely would you be to get involved in the program as described above? Extremely likely/interested Very likely/interested Somewhat likely/interested 17% 38% 35% Girls n=567 90% Likely
  63. 63. Boy Scout Opinion about Program Expansion 37% 24% 17% 9% 13% Definitely yes Probably yes Maybe Probably no Definitely no 61% Definitely yes, or probably yes
  64. 64. 28% 33% 28% 11%0% It wouldn’t I would be less excited about Scouting I would no longer want to participate Not sure Impact on Boy Scouts’ Participation 2017 Family Scouting Receptivity Study | Research & Strategy How do you feel about the BSA offering these options? Boy Scouts opposed to program expansion n =229 22% not positive x 28% would no longer participate = 6% potential boy loss
  65. 65. Summary • Families want access to our program offerings in a way that fits into their busy lives to deliver character development and values- based leadership training that Scouting promises. • Comprehensive research was conducted on this topic. • There is high receptivity and interest in an expanded program for youth girls. • The current curriculum for the Cub Scout and Boy Scout programs is deemed relevant for both boys and girls.
  66. 66. General Data
  67. 67. WHAT WE KNOW Both parents work in the household Families are getting busier Single-parent households 60% 27% Higher for underserved markets 30% Hispanic HH 55% African- American HH SOURCE: 2015 Pew Research on Parenting Nearly half of all boys are now ethnic minorities Many underserved communities prefer to participate in activities as a family Families are more diverse Over 1/3 of parents feel they spend too little free time with their kids Millennial parents want to spend more time interacting with their kids All families have less free time
  68. 68. WHAT WE KNOW SOURCE: 2017 Harris Interactive Study of Scouting Families Cub Scout parents think Cub Scouts is relevant for boys and girls 85% Greater than 2 out of 3 Southern and Northeast regions Central region Current Cub Scout parents would be interested in registering their daughters if a program was available. 70% 67% 63% Western region Parents would be interested in this type of program. Western and Southern region index highest interest Cub Parents See Program Relevance for ALL Kids Non-Scouting Families are Interested 90% 91% Southern region 95% Western region
  69. 69. Primary Research Key Takeaways to Date • Across all segments: • The current curriculum for the Cub Scout and Boy Scout programs is deemed relevant for both boys and girls. • There is high receptivity and interest in joining the program at both the Cub Scout and Boy Scout level.
  70. 70. Primary Research Key Takeaways to Date • Among Boy Scouts and Venturers, there is high interest in expanding the program with minimal impact on current program participation. • If a program for girls age 11 to 18 is added, respondents are generally in favor of allowing girls to earn the Eagle Scout rank and participate in Order of the Arrow.
  71. 71. Primary Research Key Takeaways to Date • Survey-based estimates indicate expanding the Cub Scout program to include girls 5-10 years old could potentially bring in a significant increase in membership.
  72. 72. What Are We Hearing? • One father said he has no plans to put a cap on his daughter’s dreams. • “My girl can be anything she wants to be...and I’m not going to stop her.” • “To the BSA staff, thank you for making this happen. My family is now all in Scouts. My husband was never registered before because I did everything (granted he’s very busy). It was the fact that his daughter wanted to join that he joined too. Got his full uniform yesterday. Family scouting is a very real thing.” • “I think it will be a great bonding experience and will create lifelong memories for us.” • “I’m pleased to say that several of the girls brought their brothers to join.”
  73. 73. Co-ed Results in Other Countries NumberofYouth Boys 100 Single Gender Before Change U.K., Ireland, Canada, Latin America Co-ed
  74. 74. Co-ed Results in Other Countries NumberofYouth Boys 100 70 Co-ed Single Gender Before Change Co-ed After Change U.K., Ireland, Canada, Latin America
  75. 75. Co-ed Results in Other Countries NumberofYouth Boys 100 70 Boys Girls Single Gender Before Change U.K., Ireland, Canada, Latin America Co-ed After Change
  76. 76. Maturity Levels by Age NumberofYouth 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Age GirlsBoys
  77. 77. Maturity Levels by Age NumberofYouth 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Age GirlsBoys
  78. 78. Maturity Levels by Age NumberofYouth 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Age GirlsBoys
  79. 79. Maturity Levels by Age NumberofYouth 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Age GirlsBoys
  80. 80. Maturity Levels by Age NumberofYouth 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Age GirlsBoys
  81. 81. Maturity Levels by Age NumberofYouth 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Age GirlsBoys
  82. 82. Maturity Levels by Age NumberofYouth 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Age GirlsBoys
  83. 83. Maturity Levels by Age NumberofYouth 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Age GirlsBoys
  84. 84. Maturity Levels by Age NumberofYouth 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Age GirlsBoys
  85. 85. Maturity Levels by Age NumberofYouth 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Age GirlsBoys
  86. 86. Maturity Levels by Age NumberofYouth 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Age GirlsBoys
  87. 87. Family Scouting NumberofYouth Boys 100 70 Boys Girls Single Gender Before Change Co-ed After Change Family Scouting Single Gender Boys 100 Girls 30 Create this Future
  88. 88. An Introduction to Family Scouting National Capital Area Council

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