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Meaningful activity later in life connections for governors conference 2016

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Meaningful activity later in life connections for governors conference 2016

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Meaningful activity later in life connections for governors conference 2016

  1. 1. CONNECTIONS: ACTIVITY ENGAGEMENT FOR PERSONS DIAGNOSED WITH DEMENTIA Ellen Phipps, CTRS, MSG Alzheimer’s Association, CWVA; VCU Governor’s Conference on Aging 2016
  2. 2. CONNECTIONS IS: A one-on-one, personalized activity intervention designed to create an “activity station” to help persons with dementia self-initiate engagement in a meaningful activity.
  3. 3. CONNECTIONS IS EVIDENCED BASED ● Initial seed funding through a grant from UVA ● Funding from ARDRAF research award: 32 of 34 (94%) persons with dementia engaged in activity when structured by the investigators, student visitors, and/or caregivers. Caregivers reported increased confidence in structuring activities in the home. Published in the Journal of Therapeutic Recreation. ● AoA Grant for home-visitation program to rural areas ● Best practice award – National Caregivers Alliance
  4. 4. BENEFITS ● Prevent frustration ● Prevent boredom and challenging behaviors ● Provide mental stimulation ● Improve physical activity and general health ● Promote social interaction which will reduce feelings of loneliness, isolation and depression ● Improve sleep habits ● Improve self esteem ● Provide enjoyment!!!
  5. 5. THERAPEUTIC OUTCOMES of MEANINGFUL ACTIVITY ○ Reduces falls and injuries related to falls ○ Reduces disturbing behaviors exhibited by individuals with dementia which leads to decreased use of psychotropic medications and chemical restraints ○ Decreases the symptoms of Depression and Anxiety ○ Decreases apathy/Increases engagement ○ Improves subjective well-being and quality of life
  6. 6. PRACTICE FIELDS: RECREATION THERAPY ● Recreation therapy – a process that utilizes activity-based interventions based on the assessed needs of individuals with illness and/or disabling conditions. The purpose of the process is to improve or maintain physical, cognitive, social, emotional and spiritual functioning in order to facilitate full participation in life ● Montessori - This unique approach builds on current strengths and abilities as well as environmental modification. Montessori-Based Dementia Programming uses rehabilitation principles including guided repetition, task breakdown, and progressing from simple to complex. ● Cognitive Intervention - In dementia care, cognitive intervention approaches often capitalize on the individual’s cognitive strengths, and care providers may be trained to provide verbal cues as well as set up environmental modification to assist persons with cognitive losses
  7. 7. Person-Centered Care ● Care is driven by the care recipient and supported by the care professional. ● Recognizes the individuality of each person ● Honors respect and dignity
  8. 8. CORE PRINICPLES OF CONNECTIONS ● Trusting relationship ● Reflects individual preferences ● One-on-One or Self Initiation ● Strength-based ● Control the environment ● It’s about the PROCESS….
  9. 9. GETTING STARTED: STEP ONE: BUILDING TRUST TOOL: Conversation Starters ○ Where were you born? ○ Family / Spouse ○ School days ○ Childhood ○ Occupation ○ Volunteer Work ○ Social / Cultural
  10. 10. STEP TWO: LEISURE INTERESTS TOOL: Leisure Interest Survey Domains !Creative / Expressive !Intellectual !Physical !Productive / Work !Social / Leisure/ Entertainment !Spiritual / Insightful
  11. 11. STEP THREE: CURRENT LEVEL OF FUNCTION ● TOOL: Cognitive Check List ● Medical Status ● Mobility ● Vision
  12. 12. 
 FOCUS ON STRENGTHS
  13. 13. CONNECTIONS: FOCUS ON STRENGTHS
  14. 14. SYMPTOMS AND STRENGTHS CHART 
 EARLY STAGE
  15. 15. SYMPTOMS AND STRENGTHS CHART 
 MIDDLE STAGE
  16. 16. SYMPTOMS AND STRENGTHS CHART 
 LATE STAGE
  17. 17. SUMMARY OF INFORMATION ✓ Personal information about past occupation, personality and interests ✓ Leisure interests; hobbies ✓ Current level of function with focus on strengths ✓ Other important information about functional ability – vision, hearing, mobility, etc.
  18. 18. IS SHE A MUSICIAN?
  19. 19. DAILY CHORES
  20. 20. IS SHE A SPORTS FAN?
  21. 21. VIEWING ART
  22. 22. WHAT WAS HIS PROFESSION?
  23. 23. MIDDLE EXAMPLES THROUGH THE STAGES
  24. 24. MUSIC
  25. 25. POLISHING SILVER SHINING SHOES 25 DAILY CHORES
  26. 26. MAKING ART:CREATIVE EXPRESSION
  27. 27. DID HE ENJOY FISHING?
  28. 28. REMINISCE 28
  29. 29. VIEWING ART
  30. 30. ADAPTED GAMES
  31. 31. ADAPTED GAMES
  32. 32. LATER STAGE EXAMPLES THROUGH THE STAGES
  33. 33. MUSIC
  34. 34. DAILY CHORES Care for the animals Wipe off the bathroom counter with spray and cloth
  35. 35. CREATIVE EXPRESSION
  36. 36. THROUGH THE SENSES
  37. 37. Sensory Aprons
  38. 38. GOING FOR A WALK
  39. 39. DOLL THERAPY
  40. 40. QUESTIONS
  41. 41. ACTIVITY RESOURCES ● A Different Visit (Joltin, Adena; Camp, Cameron; Noble, Beverely; Antenucci, Vincent; Menorah Park Center for Senior Living) ● Activity Programming for Persons with Dementia (Alzheimer’s Association) ● Best Friend’s Book of Alzheimer’s Activities (Bell, Virginia; Troxel, David; Cox, Tonya; Hamon, Robin; Health Professions Press) ● Doing things (Zgola, Jitka; Johns Hopkins University Press) ● Positive interactions (Nissenboim, Sylvia; Vroman, Christine; Health Professions Press) ● Reminiscence magazine ● 101 things to do…
  42. 42. CONTACT Ellen Phipps, CTRS, MSG, Gerontologoist Vice President Programs & Services Alzheimer's Association Central & Western Virginia 1160 Pepsi Place, Suite 306 Charlottesville, VA 22901 Phone: 434-973-6122 , ext. 103 Fax: 434-973-4224 ellen.phipps@alz.org www.alz.org/cwva

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