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Ageism and person centered care vcu health

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Ageism and person centered care vcu health

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Ageism and person centered care vcu health

  1. 1. THE LANGUAGE OF AGEISM: BARRIERS AND STRATEGIES
 
 TRACEY GENDRON AND AYN WELLEFORD
  2. 2. • Ageism – stereotyping and discriminating against individuals or groups on the basis of their age (Butler, 1969) • Aging Anxiety – the fear of growing old • Gerontophobia – the fear of older adults/ elderly
  3. 3. What forms might ageism take? Aging Anxiety/ Gerontophobia Internalized AgeismInternalized Microaggression Explicit Bias Implicit Bias or Unconscious Bias Microaggression
  4. 4. Ageism – Explicit Bias
 
 Explicit bias requires that a person has awareness of their judgments as well as the corresponding belief that their evaluation is correct in some manner 
 Examples Old people are grumpy Old people can’t drive
  5. 5. The Language of Implicit Bias
 
 
 She has a young spirit or a young heart He looks younger everyday 94 years old and still sharp as a tack
  6. 6. The Language of Internalized Ageism 
 
 
 I’m not old…I’m just more mature!” 76 years old and when asked if she considers herself to be old she says “Nope!” and then continues to refer to the other residents as “old people” Health is for the young, when you are our age you do the best you can
  7. 7. What we say Aging Tsunami You’re too young to remember this but… Has a young spirit Senior moment What we mean ?? ?? ?? ??
  8. 8. AGEISM IN ASSISTED LIVING: WHAT WE KNOW & WHAT WE NEED TO LEARN
 
 JENNIFER INKER AND JENNIFER PRYOR
  9. 9. Why would ageism exist in assisted living? • It’s in society. – But not widely recognized. – Even when recognized, its harms are not. • The setting may encourage it. • Resident acuity may trigger it.
  10. 10. What forms might ageism take? Over- accommodating Stigmatizing
  11. 11. EXAMPLES OF AGEISM WE SEE EVERYDAY
  12. 12. What we say: “Where do you think you’re going? That is not your room, silly girl! Give me your hand and we’ll find your room. Come on,sweetie.”
 Instead, try this: “Mrs. W., it looks like you’re lost. Are you having trouble finding your room? ... All of these doors look alike. Your room is just down the hall. Let me show you the way.” Why we do it: • Highly Caring • “Keeping it light” Why it’s ageist: • Infantilizing • Causes embarrassment
  13. 13. What we say: It’s Mrs. B.’s 87th Birthday. “Happy birthday! Let me guess, you’re turning 29, right?” “I’m 87 today” “You look good for your age!” Instead, try this: “Happy Birthday Mrs. B.! What do you have planned to celebrate your birthday today?” Why we do it: • Paying a compliment • To make someone feel good Why it’s ageist: • Ignoring life accomplishments • Placing a value on youth
  14. 14. What we say: An older couple are kissing and holding hands. “Aw, look how cute they are!” Instead, try this: “You can really see how much Mr. and Mrs. J. love each other. I think a love like that is beautiful.” Why we do it: • To acknowledge an older couple’s affection Why it’s ageist: • Infantilizing • Causes embarrassment • Disrespectful of mature relationships
  15. 15. What we say: Mr. J. is cognitively impaired. His family is concerned about his memory. “When people get older they get dementia, but we provide them with the best care.” Instead, try this: “I know you are concerned about your father’s memory. We can provide you with resources to help you understand his condition better.” Why we do it: • Attempting to put the family at ease Why it’s ageist: • Myth not fact • Generalizing • Us vs. Them
  16. 16. What can we do? • Become attentive to what we model • Recognize the need for education and training • Be compassionate with ourselves and others

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