Non Verbals Communication 130 – Professor Allen
Interpersonal Dimensions <ul><ul><li>Hostile </li></ul></ul>Friendly Dominant Submissive According to Argyle (1975) , ther...
Albert Mehrabian’s 1972 study loud, assertive  Soft Tone of Voice Smiles Facial Expression 1) more relaxed 2) head tilted ...
Proximity – Intimate Space <ul><li>1.5 Feet or Less </li></ul>
Proximity – Personal Space <ul><li>Between 1.5 and 4 Feet – For interactions between good friends </li></ul>
Proximity –Social Space <ul><li>Between 4-12 feet – for interaction among acquaintances </li></ul>
Proximity –Public Space <ul><li>12-25 feet, used for public speaking </li></ul>
Proximity <ul><li>- These are general rules, that apply to the United States, in other parts of the world these may vary c...
Gaze <ul><li>-  Gaze  and  eye contact  are two separate entities: </li></ul><ul><li>Gaze  means looking at a person, whil...
Proxemics and Eye Contact <ul><li>In 1972, Argyle conducted an experiment in which subjects were asked to look at an objec...
Proxemics and Eye Contact Position in inches of nearest approach under different conditions  31.4 27.6 16.9 Children 42.7 ...
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Non Verbals 2

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Non Verbals 2

  1. 1. Non Verbals Communication 130 – Professor Allen
  2. 2. Interpersonal Dimensions <ul><ul><li>Hostile </li></ul></ul>Friendly Dominant Submissive According to Argyle (1975) , there are two dimensions to interpersonal attitudes:
  3. 3. Albert Mehrabian’s 1972 study loud, assertive Soft Tone of Voice Smiles Facial Expression 1) more relaxed 2) head tilted back 3) hands on hips 1) lean forward 2) open arms and legs (by females) Posture Raised rapidly in greeting and flirtation Eyebrow less gaze More gaze, combined with smiles (especially males) Gaze less direct 1) If mutual gaze, more direct 2) But intimate friends sit side by side Orientation 1) Within normal range 2) Closer Proximity Proximity Touches, strokes, holds Bodily Contact Dominance Affiliation Bodily Signal
  4. 4. Proximity – Intimate Space <ul><li>1.5 Feet or Less </li></ul>
  5. 5. Proximity – Personal Space <ul><li>Between 1.5 and 4 Feet – For interactions between good friends </li></ul>
  6. 6. Proximity –Social Space <ul><li>Between 4-12 feet – for interaction among acquaintances </li></ul>
  7. 7. Proximity –Public Space <ul><li>12-25 feet, used for public speaking </li></ul>
  8. 8. Proximity <ul><li>- These are general rules, that apply to the United States, in other parts of the world these may vary considerably. </li></ul><ul><li>- They may also be broken by the context- people may be crowded together on a packed subway train, or at a concert. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Gaze <ul><li>- Gaze and eye contact are two separate entities: </li></ul><ul><li>Gaze means looking at a person, while eye contact is a mutual gaze, where two people are looking at each other at the same time. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Proxemics and Eye Contact <ul><li>In 1972, Argyle conducted an experiment in which subjects were asked to look at an object and told to sit 'as close as is comfortable to see well'. Subjects were shown: </li></ul><ul><li>- a cut-out life-size photograph of a person </li></ul><ul><li>- the same person with eyes open (not a photograph) </li></ul>
  11. 11. Proxemics and Eye Contact Position in inches of nearest approach under different conditions 31.4 27.6 16.9 Children 42.7 34.0 35.7 Adults Eyes Open Eyes Shut Photo Subjects

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