Lyme Disease By:  Lacy Lowry
History The first cases of Lyme disease are believed to have originated in Lyme, Connecticut in 1975 when a group of mothe...
Definition <ul><li>Lyme disease is a bacterial illness caused by a bacterium called “spirochete,” a worm-like, spiral-shap...
Age Groups/Incidence Rates <ul><li>Lyme disease can affect anyone, no matter what the age, who is bitten by an infected ti...
Signs/Symptoms <ul><li>Stage 1 :  Characterized by a ring-like rash, accompanied with joint pain and flu symptoms. (headac...
Treatments <ul><li>Stage 1 meds :  </li></ul><ul><li>doxycycline </li></ul><ul><li>amoxicillin </li></ul><ul><li>cefuroxim...
Preventions <ul><li>Wear long-sleeved clothing while walking in the woods. </li></ul><ul><li>Use insect spray </li></ul><u...
References <ul><li>  http://www.medicinenet.com/lyme_disease/article.htm </li></ul><ul><li>www.LymeDiseaseAssociation.org ...
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Lyme Disease

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Lyme Disease

  1. 1. Lyme Disease By: Lacy Lowry
  2. 2. History The first cases of Lyme disease are believed to have originated in Lyme, Connecticut in 1975 when a group of mothers living in the same area realized that all of their children had been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. Extensive investigating by researchers into this incident led them to discover that the cause of the children’s illness was actually bacterial.
  3. 3. Definition <ul><li>Lyme disease is a bacterial illness caused by a bacterium called “spirochete,” a worm-like, spiral-shaped form in the Spirochaeta family. This bacterium is also called Borellia burgdorferi (in the U.S.) and Borellia afzelii (in Europe). </li></ul><ul><li>It is caused by ticks, normally carried by deer, that are infected with this type of bacterium. </li></ul><ul><li>It is often called “The Great Imitator,” because it imitates symptoms of many other illnesses, making it difficult to diagnose. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Age Groups/Incidence Rates <ul><li>Lyme disease can affect anyone, no matter what the age, who is bitten by an infected tick, but studies have shown that children seem to have the highest rate of cases. This may be due to their lack of safety precautions while in environments where ticks live. </li></ul><ul><li>Incidence rates in U.S: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.aldf.com/usmap.shtml </li></ul>
  5. 5. Signs/Symptoms <ul><li>Stage 1 : Characterized by a ring-like rash, accompanied with joint pain and flu symptoms. (headaches, fever, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Stage 2 : First stage symptoms go away and don’t come back again, often for weeks to months at a time </li></ul><ul><li>Stage 3 : Joint abnormalities (may cause arthritis), heart problems, and abnormalities of the nervous system begin to occur. Problems in the nervous system can include confusion, facial muscle paralysis, and meningitis. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Treatments <ul><li>Stage 1 meds : </li></ul><ul><li>doxycycline </li></ul><ul><li>amoxicillin </li></ul><ul><li>cefuroxime axetil </li></ul><ul><li>These oral meds are often prescribed simply to decrease painful arthritis symptoms or treat flu symptoms. </li></ul>Generally, Lyme Disease is curable with antibiotics . <ul><li>Stage 3 meds : </li></ul><ul><li>ceftriaxone </li></ul><ul><li>These meds are intravenous drugs prescribed in order to treat effects to the nervous system. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Preventions <ul><li>Wear long-sleeved clothing while walking in the woods. </li></ul><ul><li>Use insect spray </li></ul><ul><li>Do self-examinations for ticks after being in the woods. </li></ul><ul><li>Wash clothing and bathe after being outside </li></ul><ul><li>A vaccine was available until February 2002. Studies are now in place to find a new, more effective one. </li></ul>
  8. 8. References <ul><li> http://www.medicinenet.com/lyme_disease/article.htm </li></ul><ul><li>www.LymeDiseaseAssociation.org </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/Lyme/ </li></ul><ul><li>www.msn.com (images) </li></ul>

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