Crisis Communications Landscape has Forever Changed

401 views

Published on

A perspective from Waldo Canyon Fire

Published in: Technology, Education, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
401
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Crisis Communications Landscape has Forever Changed

  1. 1. That Was Soooo 30 Seconds  Ago:
  2. 2. While You Are Here • Set the Stage • The Incident – Waldo Canyon Fire • Opportunities • Lessons Learned – Crisis Communications – Technology / Social Media
  3. 3. Set the Stage • Social Media drove the transition from  Information Age to Attention Age • The public is looking for, distributing,  and influencing information with or  without you! • 1st on scene • Prepare now 3
  4. 4. The Incident Waldo Canyon Fire – June 2012 • Background • Statistics • Response • My Involvement Your Challenge 4
  5. 5. Background • Started mid‐day on  June 23, 2012 • In town for the  DHS/FEMA  Chemical Stockpile  (CSEPP) Workshop  in Pueblo the  coming week 5
  6. 6. Official Statistics • Type I Incident • June 23 to July 10, 2012  (100% contained) • Evacuation of approx.  32,000 residents • Partial evacuation of  the Air Force Academy • 347 homes destroyed &  46 homes damaged • 18,247 acres burned  (approx. 11K on June 26th alone) 6
  7. 7. The Growing Fire 7
  8. 8. The Growing Fire 8
  9. 9. Joint Information Center 9
  10. 10. Joint Information Center 10
  11. 11. The Reality Is… 11
  12. 12. The Players • Traditional Media – Appropriate – Reliable or        ? – Timely • Citizen (Public) Journalism – Appropriate – Reliable – Timely 12
  13. 13. The Players • Government Publishing – Appropriate – Reliable – Timely 13
  14. 14. The Opportunity Go Green!  The goal is to make our  information publishing: – Appropriate (pertinent to the incident) – Reliable (government agencies) – Timely (quicker to the public) This is where social media comes in!! 14
  15. 15. Response Agencies 15 • Colorado Springs Fire  Department PIO • Colorado EMA • US Air Force Academy • FEMA (IMT & VIII) • El Paso County Sheriff's  Office • Pike/San Isabel National  Forests • Colorado Public Health  and Environment • Mayor • Colorado Springs Police PIO • City of Colorado Springs • READY Colorado • Pikes Peak Red Cross • Colorado Springs State Patrol • Colorado State Patrol PIO • Pueblo Chemical Depot • Pueblo West Fire • And many more… Active Accounts
  16. 16. Messaging 16 Advisory • Please reserve cell phone use for emergencies only to keep the  networks free for emergency personnel use #waldocanyonfire Evacuation • MANDATORY EVACUATION: All Areas N of Garden of the Gods  between I‐25 and Western city limits. #WaldoCanyonFire Incident Impact • Current #WaldoCanyonFire #s (9:00pm): 6,200 acres; 5%  contained; 20,085 residences/160 commercial structures  threatened; 764 personnel Volunteering • HOW YOU CAN HELP: visit http://t.co/FJLQaMCq for ways to  donate/volunteer. #WaldoCanyonFire
  17. 17. Messaging 17 • Time Sensitive Information • Inadvertent broadcasts of expired information • For example: 1. “Effective immediately, Mountain Shadows is under  mandatory evacuation”  2. “6/26 5:20pm Mtn Shadows is under mandatory  evacuation” • The inclusion of time stamps into the actual content  helped prevent accidental misinformation.
  18. 18. Messaging Online data during the event Courtesy of University of Colorado, Colorado Springs 18 Data Type Characteristics Keyword (Official Hashtag) #waldocanyonfire Tweets 100,134 Unique users (6/25‐6/29) 25,672 Targeted Accounts 16 Targeted tweets (6/1‐7/9) 4,578
  19. 19. The Opportunity 19 Remember ‐ We want to Go Green! – Appropriate (pertinent to the incident) – Reliable (government agencies) – Timely (quicker to the public)
  20. 20. Lessons Learned • Acquire social media knowledge and tools NOW! • You have to be able to operate within social media • Establish an incident social media policy – Which venues will you use? Test cross‐posting – Prepare strategy statements for the community • Dashboard (HootSuite, Tweetdeck, etc.) – Unified messaging across SM platforms – Scheduling messages – Personal use for familiarity – Analytics may be built in for post‐evals 20
  21. 21. Lessons Learned • Regular Communication is key • Footage of burned residences prior to official release • Citizen journalists photos and video of response efforts • Official Hashtag established “late” after variations  already existed • No established phone bank at the JIC – Denver area codes – Caused confusion 21
  22. 22. Lessons Learned • Be a part of the community, but remember that you are only  a part – Flow with the conversation – Stay engaged (don’t retreat) – Don’t recreate content—share it – Be as responsive and appropriate as possible – Remember that everyone is under stress • Keep a finger on the pulse – If a question is asked a few times, be proactive – Acknowledge and engage community hubs – Dispel rumors • Don’t tell them what you want to tell them… tell them what  you need to tell them 22
  23. 23. Your Challenge • Look Inward • Really Look 23
  24. 24. What Now? • Don’t collect “digital dust” • Be present before, during, and after incidents • Map out a clear, workable crisis communication plan early  (and revised it often) • Implement communications strategies that integrate mobile  and social media technologies into their emergency plans 24
  25. 25. In Closing 25 Been There…  Done That…  Got the…

×