Book Research
 Go to webs.purduecal.edu/library to begin
your search
 From the main library website, you can search
for books and view...
 Narrow and focus your search to reflect
specific media and availability
 You will see the location of material in the
p...
 Searching the library’s physical contents will give you:
◦ Academic sources and their availability
◦ Non-academic source...
Academic Databases
 To use PULSE or search databases, scroll
down on the library’s main website to view
additional options
 To look for dat...
 To access databases from an off-campus
location, enter your login and password when
prompted
 This login and password i...
Select the “A” for Academic
Search Premiere
Select “Academic
Search Premiere”
 Type in your search terms like with Google & PULSE
 Before you begin searching, limit your searches to:
◦ Full-text
◦ P...
After you have set your search limits,
you may begin your search.
Search Terms and Limitations
 Peer-reviewed – others within the field have
reviewed the article and its information and have
vouched for its accuracy
...
 Limiting your dates to the past 5 years helps
assure you the research is current
 With some topics, going back 10 years...
 Using Boolean operators with your search
terms will help you
◦ Narrow your search
◦ Find more relevant, useful resources...
 AND narrows your search
◦ Cookies AND milk will retrieve records which contain
both the words cookies and milk
 NOT nar...
 “Nesting” – the use of parentheses to put your
search terms into sets.
 Ex: success AND (education OR employment) will
...
 Nesting is often used when search terms have
similar meanings
◦ Ex: education AND (employment OR jobs)
 You can also cr...
 Stop words – commonly used words that will
stop a keyword search because they occur
too frequently in records.
◦ Common ...
 Research question: “What are the effects of
Global Warming on agriculture?”
 Keywords: global warming, effects, agricul...
 Research question “How can we prevent teen
suicide?”
 Keywords: prevent, teen, suicide.
◦ The words “how,” “can,” and “...
Identifying Sources
 Academic sources - peer-reviewed journals and
articles found in academic databases
 Books written by professionals with...
 Writers of pseudo-academic articles rarely have academic
credentials or a degree in the subject they’re reporting but
us...
 These can show up on academic databases,
so limit your search to peer-reviewed,
scholarly journals.
 Use pseudo-academi...
 The New York Times and Wall Street Journal
newspapers
 Time, U. S. News and World Report, and
Newsweek magazines
 Webs...
 Be wary of most websites unless you can prove
the site’s credible authorship
 Websites with .com, .net, and .org can be...
 Articles found in popular periodicals
◦ Ex.: People magazine, the Northwest Indiana Times
newspaper
 Sacred or religiou...
 Most introductions to fictional works
(regardless of where they are published)
 Movies and TV shows
 Wikipedia
 Indiana residents may register for inspire.net,
which will provide a password (for free) to
access many full-text articl...
Thanks and Good Luck!
Finding & Evaluating Academic Research
Finding & Evaluating Academic Research
Finding & Evaluating Academic Research
Finding & Evaluating Academic Research
Finding & Evaluating Academic Research
Finding & Evaluating Academic Research
Finding & Evaluating Academic Research
Finding & Evaluating Academic Research
Finding & Evaluating Academic Research
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Finding & Evaluating Academic Research

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This is a workshop for Purdue University Calumet's Writing Center on how to find credible sources. It involves using different search databases, limiting your search options, and evaluating sources found to choose only academic sources.

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Finding & Evaluating Academic Research

  1. 1. Book Research
  2. 2.  Go to webs.purduecal.edu/library to begin your search  From the main library website, you can search for books and view the library hours of operation
  3. 3.  Narrow and focus your search to reflect specific media and availability  You will see the location of material in the physical library based on Library of Congress Call Numbers
  4. 4.  Searching the library’s physical contents will give you: ◦ Academic sources and their availability ◦ Non-academic sources  You will still need to evaluate any books or media before using to make sure they’re academic  Academic databases (EBSCOhost, ERIC, PubMed, etc.) will also provide you with academic sources  Google will not necessarily provide academic sources but will provide electronic sources (i.e. websites)
  5. 5. Academic Databases
  6. 6.  To use PULSE or search databases, scroll down on the library’s main website to view additional options  To look for databases by name, select “Alphabetically” under the Databases section
  7. 7.  To access databases from an off-campus location, enter your login and password when prompted  This login and password is the same you use to access campus computers
  8. 8. Select the “A” for Academic Search Premiere
  9. 9. Select “Academic Search Premiere”
  10. 10.  Type in your search terms like with Google & PULSE  Before you begin searching, limit your searches to: ◦ Full-text ◦ Peer-reviewed articles ◦ Published within the past 5 years  The period of time may vary depending on instructor/course, but is generally from 5-10 years
  11. 11. After you have set your search limits, you may begin your search.
  12. 12. Search Terms and Limitations
  13. 13.  Peer-reviewed – others within the field have reviewed the article and its information and have vouched for its accuracy ◦ Using peer-reviewed sources means you’re not spreading what may be false information. These are the best sources  Full text – you’ll only receive results that have the full text article available ◦ You may get abstracts or summaries, which aren’t helpful, if you don’t choose this option.
  14. 14.  Limiting your dates to the past 5 years helps assure you the research is current  With some topics, going back 10 years can be helpful for historical context  More scientific topics require more recent research ◦ Ex: Cell-based research has grown exponentially since the 1980s, and any information beyond 5 years may not be accurate.
  15. 15.  Using Boolean operators with your search terms will help you ◦ Narrow your search ◦ Find more relevant, useful resources ◦ Ex: AND, OR, NOT, etc.
  16. 16.  AND narrows your search ◦ Cookies AND milk will retrieve records which contain both the words cookies and milk  NOT narrows your search ◦ Chocolate NOT cake will retrieve records which contain the term chocolate but not cake  OR broadens your search: ◦ Caffeine OR coffee will retrieve records which contain either caffeine or coffee
  17. 17.  “Nesting” – the use of parentheses to put your search terms into sets.  Ex: success AND (education OR employment) will retrieve records with the word “success” and the word “education” or the word “employment.”  In other words, for a result to be returned, it MUST contain the word “success.” It MUST also contain either the word “education” OR the word “employment.”
  18. 18.  Nesting is often used when search terms have similar meanings ◦ Ex: education AND (employment OR jobs)  You can also create nesting within nesting ◦ EX: (driving AND (texting OR distraction OR distracted)) NOT (alcohol OR “drunk driving”) ◦ Ex:(teenager OR adolescent) AND (media OR movie OR TV) AND ((“eating disorder” OR bulimia OR anorexia) NOT (“drug use” OR “substance abuse”))
  19. 19.  Stop words – commonly used words that will stop a keyword search because they occur too frequently in records. ◦ Common stop words: the, an, at, for, from, then.  When constructing a keyword search, choose the most important words.
  20. 20.  Research question: “What are the effects of Global Warming on agriculture?”  Keywords: global warming, effects, agriculture. ◦ The words “what,” “is,” “of,” and “the” are not descriptive of your topic.  Search phrase: global warming AND (effects AND agriculture)  When constructing a keyword search, choose the most important words.
  21. 21.  Research question “How can we prevent teen suicide?”  Keywords: prevent, teen, suicide. ◦ The words “how,” “can,” and “we” are not descriptive of your topic.  Search phrase: “suicide prevention” AND (teenager OR adolescent)
  22. 22. Identifying Sources
  23. 23.  Academic sources - peer-reviewed journals and articles found in academic databases  Books written by professionals within their respective fields may also be academic ◦ If the author has “Dr.” or “Ph.D.” attached to her or his name, the source is probably academic.  Many books compiled by an editor (except fiction anthologies) can also be academic sources
  24. 24.  Writers of pseudo-academic articles rarely have academic credentials or a degree in the subject they’re reporting but usually have a background in writing.  The sources generally make an effort to do their fact- checking, but articles are not peer-reviewed and can make mistakes or misinform.  Pseudo-academic sources can be: ◦ Respectable news periodicals ◦ Government and some organization websites ◦ best used for information on recent events
  25. 25.  These can show up on academic databases, so limit your search to peer-reviewed, scholarly journals.  Use pseudo-academic sources sparing, if ever, in academic papers, and only when inserting real-time news on current events.
  26. 26.  The New York Times and Wall Street Journal newspapers  Time, U. S. News and World Report, and Newsweek magazines  Websites such as inhalants.org, norml.org, and www.uhcan.org are examples.
  27. 27.  Be wary of most websites unless you can prove the site’s credible authorship  Websites with .com, .net, and .org can be purchased by anyone  Websites with .gov are exclusively published by the government and often offer useful statistical and legal information  Websites, regardless of how reliable the information, should never take the place of academic articles/books
  28. 28.  Articles found in popular periodicals ◦ Ex.: People magazine, the Northwest Indiana Times newspaper  Sacred or religious texts: The Bible, the Qur’an, etc.  Abstracts  Book reviews (even if the review is of an academic book)
  29. 29.  Most introductions to fictional works (regardless of where they are published)  Movies and TV shows  Wikipedia
  30. 30.  Indiana residents may register for inspire.net, which will provide a password (for free) to access many full-text articles from home.  INSPIRE offers the use of EbscoHost (the same as Academic Search Premiere).
  31. 31. Thanks and Good Luck!

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