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Group 4<br />Note: This group had the missing 2 people so we only had 3 strategies to share instead of five as  two pairs ...
Strategy no. 1: TAKING A STAND<br />Title: Taking a stand<br />Purpose: engage in critical thinking/reflect on/deeper unde...
Strategy no 2. Literature Circles<br />Title: Literature Circles<br />Purpose: Student centered discussion/learning (NOT t...
Strategy no. 3: Issues/Values Continuum<br />Title: Issues/Values continuum<br />Purpose: To explore student opinions and ...
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Group 4 (ESE4340C)

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GROUP 4: Assignment for ESE4340C Slide show about the three instructional strategies for effective student grouping that our group discussed.

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Group 4 (ESE4340C)

  1. 1. Group 4<br />Note: This group had the missing 2 people so we only had 3 strategies to share instead of five as two pairs of our group were in the same expert groups<br />Three Instructional strategies for effective student grouping<br />Group members: Jamie A. Beech, Jennifer Cyr – unfortunately our group didn’t all share/record names – but basically everyone in group 4 should be on this list<br />
  2. 2. Strategy no. 1: TAKING A STAND<br />Title: Taking a stand<br />Purpose: engage in critical thinking/reflect on/deeper understanding. (“…the purpose for this activity is to encourage students to deliberate about public issues…”)<br />Description: Five key steps <br />step 1:present an overview of the issue and opposing side to the class (include examples and relevant details) phrase issue as a question requiring choice/action on part of the students present issue using point/counterpoint format – take student questions etc.<br />step 2: Divide class in half: assign all students a viewpoint (one side of the issue – regardless of their own personal opinion) and have them pair up in their group and share the most important/compelling points on their side of the issue. Select students from each side to share/tell the class these compelling points.<br />step 3: Encourage students to “go with their own beliefs” Students are allowed to switch sides (move) based on their own opinion – they may go to supporting side, counterpoint side and or middle location in room that represents undecided. After they move have them consider why they did and have them explain reasoning for the move to someone in the same location. Students can continue to move based on these discussions<br />step 4: Encourage interactions and descriptions: Ask 3-4 students on the point side of room to explain strongest argument for standing on that side. After each explanation allow counterpoint students to respond to comments they heard. Allow both sides to present their key arguments then when no new info/ideas are added focus on helping students to answer “What is a solution to this problem/issue” Have each consider pros and cons and have each location/group develop a solution before the class tries to unite these various ideas into one solution to reach some consensus.<br />step 5: Dialogical Reasoning Paper: Students write a four paragraph essay about an approved policy/stance of the same or a different issue following the format of the activity (paragraph 1 – intro to issue with overview and major areas of controversy; paragraph 2 – Describe primary arguments of “point” side; paragraph 3 – Describe primary arguments of “counterpoint” side; paragraph 4 – Conclude by suggesting a solution that might meet the needs/interests of the two sides.<br />
  3. 3. Strategy no 2. Literature Circles<br />Title: Literature Circles<br />Purpose: Student centered discussion/learning (NOT teacher directed) Focuses on student insights/thoughts as a way of encouraging critical reflection and deeper understanding.<br />Description: Students are divided into literature circles in a random ordering process (can be done for differentiation purposes on basis of interest, readiness, or content, process, and product). Seven key roles: connector, summarizer, travel chaser, vocabenricher, discussion director, illustrator, and literary luminary.<br />Connector: Finds connections between text/info in class and real world experiences or applications (can be connections between subjects as well)<br />Summarizer: Summarizes text, main ideas, key issues, plot points etc –keeps everyone on the same page with a consolidated summary.<br />Travel Chaser: Diagrams keeps people up to date with the setting, flow, order of information in the text, the general plot organizer.<br />VocabEnricher: Makes a list of unknown or confusing words to add to word wall or for group to look up and define in order to add to understanding of the text.<br />Discussion director: Makes a list of questions to guide discussion and cues the illustrator when to show/explain image.<br />Illustrator: Creates or finds an image that best describes the theme or messages in the text and then shares and explains it to the group during the literature circle activity.<br />Literary luminary: Finds engaging or meaningful passages and quotes inside the text and shares them with the circle to encourage discussion and deeper reflection on the text.<br />
  4. 4. Strategy no. 3: Issues/Values Continuum<br />Title: Issues/Values continuum<br />Purpose: To explore student opinions and values & discover/relate to others opinions and values<br />Description: (see image at the bottom) Teacher picks an issue and will draw a continuum on the board, labeling it based on a likert scale, and then allowing students to use a sticky notes to place themselves on the continuum based on their opinion and prior knowledge of the topic. At each place on the continuum allow students to explain their choice and to pose a solution to the issue or value. After allowing all students to explain their position introduce more information about the issue and inform students that over the course of the lesson/unit they will be allowed to change their position on the continuum. Used to engage students in more in-depth discussion and research about outside issues that are relevant to the curriculum.<br />Likert scale example of how the continuum would be labeled.<br />

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