Australian Soccer Curriculum

3,035 views

Published on

Published in: Sports
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,035
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
191
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
628
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Australian Soccer Curriculum

  1. 1. FFA National Curriculum
  2. 2. CONTENTSForeword from Ben Buckley 2Purpose and Objectives 3Research 6Identified Gaps 8Analysis 10FFA Curriculum Rationale 11FFA Curriculum Framework 14Implementation 30Message from the Technical Director 39
  3. 3. Foreword from Ben BuckleyThe National Curriculum was one of the key in particular their respective approaches toinitiatives put forward in the FFA’s National player and coach development.Football Development Plan, released in Underpinning the implementation of theNovember 2007. Since that time, a substantial National Curriculum will be the adoption of aamount of work has been undertaken in order consistent structural approach within eachto create a curriculum that will provide national State and Territory which will include theguidance and an integrated and consistent appointment of a Technical Director responsibleapproach to the development of players and for rolling out the Curriculum in their particularcoaches throughout the country. geographical region.On behalf of the Board and management of This Curriculum is of critical importance if weFFA, I am delighted to present the FFA National Ben Buckley are to achieve our objectives and realise a majorCurriculum to the entire football community. CEO, Football Federation Australia improvement in the quality and performance ofThis document, and its associated pathways, Australia’s best players, coaches and teams,programs and resources which will be developed as well as fostering a lifelong support of theover the coming months and years, is an game amongst its participants.Australian model which seeks to maximise thestrengths of our existing football culture. The challenge now is to bring this plan to life which will rely on the cooperation andThe National Curriculum reflects the unique contribution at every level of the game. As achallenges of our country and draws on valued member of our football family we lookresearch on the major football countries, forward to your support of this Curriculum. F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  4. 4. FFA National Curriculum |3Purpose and Objectives Objectives Curriculum Development • o produce the best players (gauged in T The key gaps in Australia’s current development terms of international competitiveness) of players and coaches have been identified. The primarily for: Curriculum has been developed to make a big ➢ the Qantas Socceroos impact on closing the gaps. ➢ the Hyundai A-League The development has involved learning from ➢ the Westfield Matildas what is done elsewhere, and the results. The Curriculum is factually and analytically based ➢ the Westfield W-League. (not a compilation of opinions!) • o produce a team that is consistently T ranked in the top 20 in the men’s FIFA The FFA has consulted widely to ensure all ranking system by 2015 (and strive for a relevant ideas and thinking are considered. position in the top 10 by 2020), and a top The resulting Curriculum is an Australian 10 team in women’s football by 2012. solution. • o create a Talent Development and T Identification Program that achieves success A fundamental transformation ofPurpose for generations to come. Australian football is needed toThe Curriculum provides for a soundly based, • o create a coach development system T achieve the objectives!consistent, coordinated national Talent in Australia that produces quality coachesDevelopment and Identification Program for that are able to bring the content of thefootball in Australia that aims to achieve a major Curriculum to life to realise the targets. Current Statusimprovement in the quality and performance of • o create a youth development system T A structured pathway is in place for theAustralia’s top players, coaches and teams. in Australia that is fully operational identification and development of Australia’s elite nationwide by 2015 and renowned as players in the 14 to 19 years age group (men’s and one of the world’s best. women’s). (Refer to Achievements and Proposed • o organise the 2018 or 2022 men’s FIFA T Initiatives no. 5: Talented Player Pathway). World Cup and compete at the highest level, A uniform nationwide structure is to be put striving to win the tournament. in place for the 8 to 14 years age group. • o be a medal winner at the 2019 women’s T The structure and technical content of this FIFA World Cup and the 2020 Olympic Talented Player Development Program is Games. provided by the National Curriculum. To achieve what the FFA has determined: Implementation must be nationwide. ➢ a set of principles that will guide action The Member Federation Charter (and ➢ a national football philosophy and a detailed through this Charter the appointment of the Curriculum with specific content. State Technical Directors) is vital for bringing the Curriculum to life. F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  5. 5. Purpose and ObjectivesNational Talented Player PathwayMen’s AGE DEVELOPMENT COMPETITION REPRESENTATION GROUP PATHWAY PATHWAY PATHWAY 21 Hyundai A-League Clubs Asian Champions League Qantas Socceroos Overseas Clubs Hyundai A-League Qantas Olyroos (U/23) Overseas Leagues Futsalroos National Futsal Championships 18–20 Hyundai A-League Youth Hyundai A-League Hyundai A-League Qantas Olyroos (U/23) State League Clubs National Youth League Qantas Young Overseas Clubs State League (Senior) Socceroos (U/20) National Futsal Championships 16–17 AIS or Hyundai A-League Youth National Youth League Qantas Young State League Clubs State League (Senior) Socceroos (U/20) National Futsal Championships AIS 14–15 State Institutes (Hyundai A-League Link) State Youth League Joeys (U/17) AIS Institute Challenges State Institutes National Youth Championships State Teams National Futsal Championships 12–14 FFA Accredited Clubs, Schools and Academies State Competition State Teams National Youth Championships National U/13-U/14 Team National Futsal Championships 10–12 FFA Accredited Clubs, Schools and Academies Club or State Competition National Futsal Championships 6–10 FFA Accredited Clubs, Schools and Academies Optus Small Sided Football Including Futsal F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  6. 6. FFA National Curriculum |5Purpose and ObjectivesNational Talented Player PathwayWomen’s AGE DEVELOPMENT COMPETITION REPRESENTATION GROUP PATHWAY PATHWAY PATHWAY 21 AIS Westfield W-League Westfield Matildas Overseas Overseas Leagues Westfield W-League Clubs / Universities National Futsal Championships (Futsal National Team) State League Clubs 19–20 AIS / State Institutes Westfield W-League Westfield Matildas State League Clubs Institute Challenge Westfield Young Matildas (U/20) Overseas State League (Senior) State Institutes Clubs / Universities National Futsal Championships Westfield W-League 17–18 AIS Westfield W-League Westfield Young Matildas (U/20) State Institutes Institute Challenge State Institutes State League Clubs State League (Senior) Westfield W-League National Championships National Futsal Championships 15–16 State Institutes Westfield W-League National U/17 Team State League Clubs State Competition State Institutes National Championships State Teams National Futsal Championships 12–14 FFA Accredited Clubs, Schools and Academies State Competition State Teams National Championships National U/13-U/14 Team National Futsal Championships 10–12 FFA Accredited Clubs, Schools and Academies Club or State Competition National Futsal Championships 6–10 FFA Accredited Clubs, Schools and Academies Optus Small Sided Football Including Futsal F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  7. 7. ResearchConduct of Research Research Foundation Implications of Research• Review team with diverse expertise • ery extensive body of scientific research V • o become an outstanding adult footballer it T about talent development and identification: generally takes at least 10 years of sustained,• Review of scientific research ➢ for sport in general deliberate practice from a young age:• Research on Australian data ➢ for football in particular ➢ the vast majority of development occurs in• isits to a selection of other football V training / practice – not in competition ➢ much of it validated multinationally federations ➢ typically, the bulk of training occurs • istinction between giftedness (natural D• onsultation with other Australian sports C during personal practice, without ability) and talent (developed ability) professional supervision. This is bodies • Limitations on talent prediction: where ‘touch’ is developed• Submissions from interested parties ➢ implications for early identification of future • his requires not just good coaching and T• onsultation with local football experts C talented players training opportunities but exceptional, and representatives enduring personal commitment. • Age-related development stages• Extensive discussion within review team • n general, recognising giftedness is easy; I • Time and effort to develop football mastery:• Input by the Technical Director. it is much more difficult to identify players ➢ the importance of long-term dedication. that may become top players with the • quandering the talent pool – Relative Age S appropriate training environment. Effect & financial barrier • eographic differences in generating G athletes • Generally gender neutral. F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  8. 8. FFA National Curriculum |7ResearchImplications of Research (cont.) Research and Overseas Practices• s a consequence, many players with real A • here is a particular style of play and T While similar development considerations potential are excluded from development playing system best suited to the overall apply around the world, the most practical opportunities and drop out of the talent pool. development of players. development arrangements vary as a It is also crucial to recognise differences in consequence of differences in factors such as • he emphasis on coach education is T ability and not simply maturation differences. population, population concentration, climate, extremely strong in the most established affluence, attitudes to sport, overall sporting• his is exacerbated when prevailing T and powerful football nations. environment, and government involvement in practices for young players emphasise • arge cities are much less effective, per L sport, history, tradition and football culture. winning competitions rather than skill capita, at generating talented athletes than development. So, in examining practices of other federations, are regional localities. we saw the combined effect of general youth• here are particular age-related stages in T • here is likely to be multiple pathways for T development dynamics and the specific the natural development of children when talent to emerge (late developers), not just national conditions. In learning from those acquisition of certain types of ability is a single, prescribed pathway. other federations, we have disentangled the relatively easy. This affects the ideal ages components and then identified which practices for developing particular football skills and are likely to be most effective in Australia, given the type of training experiences appropriate its particular national conditions. at different ages. The optimum practices and approach for Australia turn out to be a combination of what was observed in more than one country. F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  9. 9. Identified GapsA. Technical skills are deficient in players in elite programs / competitions.B. Deficient game skills and game hardness evident in mid-teens and later (particularly 15–18 age years group).C. Loss of potential talent due to Relative Age Effect.D. Loss of potential talent due to the financial barrier.E. Omission of a lot of potential talent from regional Australia.F. Abilities of coaches for talented young players and for senior teams.Gap A: Deficient Technical Skills Gap C: Loss of Potential Talent due to Relative Age Effect (RAE)Technical skills: Individuals born earliest within certain age groups tend to have size, speed, ➢ all skills required when in contact with the ball coordination, mental and emotional advantages over those born later in the same age group, even when they have the same innate potential. This is ➢ the ability to treat the ball as a coordinated extension of self. particularly the case in the U/14, U/15 and U/16 age groups because of theAustralia’s top players are seen as very competitive and physically effective growth spurt.footballers but are not praised for their technical excellence (FIFA technical reports). Australian Institute of Sport (AIS), National Training Centre (NTC) This period of the player’s development coincides with the selectionand national coaches find the players they receive are weak on technical skills. processes for the respective State and age-group national teams as wellThe world’s best players start developing technical skills at a young age. as the NTC and AIS programs.Strong technical skills are needed before developing strong game skills. In a competitive environment, those born later within this age cohort tend toAustralia cannot produce a significant number of world-class footballers be selected out. As a result in later stages of youth development, and entryuntil it is world class in developing technical skills, that persist under into professional ranks, the remaining talent pool is heavily dominated bypressure, in its young players (while preserving their current strengths). players born early in the grouping year(s). Extensive research provides evidence of this effect for football and otherGap B: Deficient Game Skills sports in Australia and throughout the world (particularly for men).Game skills / game hardness: With the age group selection of the U/17 and U/20 national teams, individuals born in the ‘wrong’ years get reduced development ➢ neuro-physiological adaptation to playing high intensity football at a high opportunities. For this reason, commencing in 2009 the AIS program standard with the commitment and ability to get results intake now comprises 2 age groups. Similar measures are required to be ➢ beyond technical skills although needed as the foundation undertaken around the country. ➢ comes from extensive, regular, meaningful, high-level competition. It is the expertise of the coach to be able to notice and rule out the negativeIn the most successful football countries, by age 17 or 18, the best young players influence of RAE and to identify the real talented player. In some cases itare competing in professional senior environments (with adult professionals). could also be advisable to leave a talented but physically slow developer forA typical league season in major football countries covers 10 to 11 months. a certain period of time with a younger age group (regulations may need to Talented young players who develop game skills and are game hardened be modified).earliest, get the highest level club competition opportunities before others A nationwide education program is the key to ensuring that those entrustedof the same age – further extending their game skills / hardness and continuously increasing their competitive lead. with selecting the players for our development programs are in fact making decisions based on the long-term interests of Australian football (player For our best young players to mature, in a football sense in line with top development) and not short-term results.overseas counterparts, they require a high-level coordinated year-roundtraining and competition environment. F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  10. 10. FFA National Curriculum |9Identified GapsGap D: Loss of Potential Talent due to Financial Barrier Gap F: Ability of Elite CoachesAcross the world, football is very easy accessible for every child, rich or On average, Australian coaches available for elite youth development andpoor. This is one of the main reasons why it has become the world’s game; for State and national competition teams have less relevant experience andyou only need a ball, even if it is one made of rags. Traditionally the talented consequently less expertise than their counterparts in top football countries.children have often come from a lower socioeconomic environment. Australia has some good coaches but it can boast few world-class coachesIn Australia however, football is becoming an expensive sport and therefore comparable to those commonly found in the best football nations.not affordable for some families. When a child is identified as being There is a ‘chicken and egg’ dynamic at work:talented and selected for participation in State and National Championships ➢ top players and top teams need top coachesthe threshold becomes even higher because of the ‘user pays’ system. ➢ but top coaches emerge over time from extensive experience with topSometimes this is exacerbated by distance from the main football centres. players, top teams and top competitionsTherefore, the assumption is justifiable that this situation causes a ➢ since Australia has lacked top competitions, there has been limitedsubstantial loss of potential talent. development of its coaches, despite their potential.It is the (moral) responsibility of the football community to This constraint has been partially offset by the very high standards oflevel this barrier and make football accessible for every child. coaching generally at the AIS combined with the infusion of some high quality coaches from overseas either as migrants or short-term appointments.Gap E: Omission of Talent from Regional Australia Nonetheless, Australia’s capacity to be an internationally competitive football nation will continue to be severely constrained until it can self-generate aFor most Australian sports rural locations are much better (per capita) than substantial body of world-class development and competition coaches.big cities at generating athletes. Unlike other football codes in Australia,football has been predominantly a city game (75% of Australian A-League players develop in large cities).This is consistent with football (soccer) in Australia having been fostered by 20th-century European immigrants and their children, who tended to clusterin the capital and industrial cities. The historical immigration dynamic thathas underpinned football in Australia appears to be weakening. This poses amajor threat to Australia’s future talent pool unless offset by a much greatershare of young athletes from rural areas.Since players need to be inducted into the game at an early age, this wouldrequire initiatives that make football much more accessible in rural Australiaand at the same time, would also draw many more Indigenous Australiansinto the game. F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  11. 11. AnalysisAn analysis of Australian football Analysis–Weaknesses Analysis–Cause and Effectprovides an insight into what • Overall technical GAME skills, Both strengths and weaknesses are caused bytechnical aspects need to be in particular: the strong emphasis in Australia on results andaddressed and improved in winning at too young an age. ➢ individual attacking qualities (creativity)order to realise the NationalCurriculum objectives. ➢ first touch under pressure Winning is the purpose of football but ➢ short passing game the manner and importance differs! ➢ handling speed in tight areas. If we want to take our football to the world’sAnalysis–Strengths • Ball possession/positioning play, top level, youth development will need to• ustralian football players are physically A in particular: focus more on: strong and competitive. ➢ playing out from the back ➢ development instead of results• ustralian players have a well developed A ➢ controlling / changing the speed of the game ➢ the skilful instead of the powerful winner’s mentality. ➢ successful attacking combinations. ➢ mistakes being learning moments instead of• ustralian players are in general mature at a A mistakes being punished • actical maturity, T young age and have a strong determination in particular: ➢ encouraging individual play instead of to succeed. forbidding individual play ➢ actical awareness; ‘reading’ the game t• he Australian football preference is for T ➢ encouraging taking initiatives / risks instead ➢ eadership; decision-making on the pitch l of forbidding taking initiatives / risks an attacking, ‘open’ game which is the ➢ ame ‘cleverness’; being ‘street smart’. g ➢ playing out purposefully instead of the long characteristic style of the A-League and W-League. ball etc. In other words it is the choice between: short-term losing, long-term winning or short-term winning, long-term losing. F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  12. 12. FFA National Curriculum | 11FFA Curriculum RationaleThe following principles guide this Curriculum:1. Using the experience of the world’s best football nations.2. Adjusting their visions to the specific Australian circumstances.3. Using the strengths of the Australian sport and football culture.4. Taking evidence based rational facts into consideration.5. Using a practical ‘total football’ approach with: ➢ age-related development goals ➢ game-related approach as the major focus of training ➢ a proactive style of play ➢ uniform system of play (formation) a ➢ an emphasis on technique before tactics and conditioning ➢ a ‘guided discovery’ approach in player and coach development . F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  13. 13. FFA Curriculum RationaleThe Curriculum is divided into two streams:1. Talented Player and Coach Development Program 2. Community Player and Coach Development ProgramThere are a very small number of super talented (‘the gifted’) players who There is no ‘magic trick’ and there are no magicians who can make awill almost always succeed. superstar from an untalented child. The vast majority of children do not have the talent to reach the top but they are still very important. They are entitledThere is a larger group of talented players who do not attract attention at to a stimulating and entertaining environment where they can reach theirfirst glance. They can reach top-level if identified early and provided with personal potential.quality training and coaching in a stimulating and challenging environment. The Community Player and Coach Development Program focuses on thisThe Talented Player and Coach Development Program focuses on these two group. This program provides clear guidelines on how to train Australia’sgroups. This program provides clear guidelines on how to train Australia’s community players and guide coaches to teach, play and learn football in atalented players from age 8 to 19, as well as the development of coaches in stimulating and entertaining environment. The ultimate aim is to enable themorder for the players and coaches to appropriately and effectively compete to reach their personal potential and stay committed to the game for life.at the world’s top level.The starting point is a particularly practical The Curriculum’s philosophy is that the most As a result the essence of teaching (training) is to approach. As a result the terms that are used appropriate way for teaching and learning always think of the actual game situation as theare mostly in football-acting language instead football is to: starting point and then simplify / modify the gameof clichés and semi-scientific language without situation for training. This is achieved by reducing Leave the total football structure as muchthe football context. the game-specific resistances until the training as possible intact so its relationship to the aim can be realised by the players.The Curriculum works with 2-year age group game is always recognisable for playersblocks where there are specific development in all training situations and exercises. Therefore a coach must be able to:objectives related to the mental and physical The game is complex and unpredictable ➢ analyse footballdevelopment phase. (not one situation or action is the same). ➢ define the ‘football problems’ of theThere are competence profiles and assessment Every football action in the game is defined team and / or the individual players informs per position that outline the basic tasks by various factors such as the ball, the rules, football-acting languageand skills. opponents and teammates, space, time, ➢ design and implement exercises toTheoretical and scientific foundation underpinning direction, the score etc. realise the training aims.the Curriculum can be found in various By isolating parts from this total context theypublications. These, alongside a variety of books, lose their significance, in other words, theDVDs and referenced articles will be linked to the football structure is lost.Curriculum. This is the essence of ‘unorganised’ street / park football where the foundations of every top player can be found. F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  14. 14. FFA National Curriculum | 13FFA Curriculum RationaleIn every youth training session the following For the talented players a modification This choice for a temporary modification isquestions should be answered with YES: is being made temporarily to this strictly limited to functional ball skills. Although1) Is football being played? approach in the 8 to 12 years versatile moving (general, non-football specific age group in order to perfect and coordination) is also important and can be2) Is football being learned and therefore taught? developed quickly at this age, the focus must be accelerate the development of basic3) Is football being experienced and enjoyed? on skill development. skills. This age group is universally4) Do the players understand the football acknowledged to be the optimal In Australia the development of general physical purpose of the exercise? mental and physical phase in which attributes is already strongly emphasised outside of the football environment (school, outdoor life etc.) 5) Do the players recognise the children are able to learn motor skills. game-related intention? The credo therefore is: It is however, vital to focus on6) Are the players challenged to improve both functional game skills and not confuse “No waste of precious FOOTBALL individually and as a team? these with non-game related ‘tricks’. training time!”For the vast majority of children this game- Also a permanent and immediaterelated approach is the most enjoyable, logical skills transfer into positioning andand scientifically proven child-sport way of small sided games is an absolutelearning to play football, enabling them to reach requirement (whole – part – whole).their personal potential and stay committed tothe game for life. The passing exercises are an essential and very specific part of the functional game skills and will therefore be maintained permanently throughout all age groups. F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  15. 15. FFA Curriculum FrameworkThe total STRUCTURE OF FOOTBALL is always the starting point.The Main Moments of the game are:1. Ball possession (BP): Building up, attacking and scoring (team tasks).2. Transition: BP to BPO (team tasks).3. Ball possession opponent (BPO): Disturbing and defending (team tasks).4. Transition: BPO to BP (team tasks).A game of football is a constant repetition of these 4 main moments, each with its characteristic team tasks.At the individual player level the team tasks lead to individual skills and competencies that are positionspecific and partly depend on the style of play / formation. These are always defined by Technique,Insight and Communication.• The ball first touch• Rules playing out Technique (technical ability, skills)• Direction creativity• Opponents decision-making • Space handling speed Insight (awareness, vision)• Time game reading• Teammates tempo change• Score game cleverness Communication• Pressure leadershipTechnique, Insight and Communication are distinguishable but in football (training) not separable. F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  16. 16. FFA National Curriculum | 15FFA Curriculum Framework The Structure of FOOTBALL Main Moments Transitioning Ball Possession Ball Possession Opponent (BPO) Own Team (BP) Transitioning Disturbing Defending Team Tasks Building Up Attacking / Scoring Position Position Individual Skills Position Position Specific Specific & Competencies Specific Specific Technique – Insight – Technique – Insight – Communication Communication F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  17. 17. FFA Curriculum Framework DEVELOPMENT GOALS AGE GROUP TIC Learning to master the ball U/6–U/7 Getting a ‘TIC’ for football Learning to act with the ball purposefully U/8–U/9 TIC Learning to play together purposefully U/10–U/11 TIC Learning the positions and basic tasks in 11 v 11 U/12–U/13 TIC Learning how the basic tasks link together U/14–U/15 TIC Learning how to play as a team U/16–U/17 TIC Performing / winning as a team U/18–U/19 TIC The size and colour of the 3 characters TIC indicate which of the 3 aspects, Technique, Insight and Communication is being emphasised (not isolated!) in training during that particular development phase.
  18. 18. FFA National Curriculum | 17FFA Curriculum FrameworkIn order to define the individual tasks / skills indetail and thus provide a concise and structureddevelopment pathway, the Curriculum providesclarity on: ➢ a style of play ➢ game organisation (formation) suitable a to train the style of play from the moment the 11 v 11 game is being played.To tackle the identified shortcomings inAustralian football and also opt for a style of playthat corresponds with the ‘Aussie’ mentality /preference, a proactive style of play using the1–4–3–3 formation will be introduced.This style will therefore be mandated forall FFA-controlled development teams.In the 1–4–3–3 formation there are 3 lineswith a balanced spread of players over the pitch As a consequence of the philosophy, physical The Football Conditioning Method: fitness is also an inseparable (conditional )(‘triangles’ of players) which is an important • he 4 key indicators are trained in 6-week T component of football’s structure which leadscondition for: cycles. to the proposition: ➢ ‘manicured’ positioning play, playing out, • verload principle: increasing time / series, O ➢ conditioning is football training combination football decreasing rest / intervals per 6 weeks. ➢ football training is conditioning. ➢ creative and varied attacking play, using the width of the field Analysis of football conditioning shows: • nly game related football exercises. O ➢ early disturbing /pressing after losing • ootball is becoming more and more compact: F • o condition testing that gives non relevant N possession. less space on the pitch / time on the ball. information for football condition.For youth players the positions and • ecause of this the number of explosive B • ynamic stretching instead of static Daccompanying basic tasks are logical and football actions (‘football’ sprints / duels stretching (no scientific evidence for its recognisable and therefore playing as a etc.) in professional football has increased significance!).team is easier to develop. by 40% over the last 8 to 10 years. • ootball conditioning continues the whole F As a result of this, ‘Football Conditioning’The 1–4–3–3 formation has several shapes and season. is all about:variations, making it a flexible up-to-date formation. ➢ increase of explosive power in football So: No ‘waste’ of precious footballThe Optus Small Sided Football (OSSF) formats actions training time.7 v 7 (1–3–3) and 9 v 9 (1–3–2–3) lead up to ➢ increase of explosive power staminathe 1–4–3–3 formation in a logical and (explosive capacity)methodical manner. ➢ decrease of recovery time between two explosive actions ➢ increase of recovery stamina (recovery capacity). F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  19. 19. FFA Curriculum Framework Increase of Decrease of recovery explosive power in time between two football-actions explosive actions Football Condition Increase of explosive Increase of power stamina recovery stamina (explosive capacity) (recovery capacity) F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  20. 20. FFA National Curriculum | 19FFA Curriculum FrameworkThe consequence of this for the actual technical content of the Curriculum:• kill / technique training is the foundation (8 to 12 years) S• ositioning games and passing exercises are essential daily drills (12 to 19 years) P• n every training session / exercise the relationship with the game must be recognisable (12 to 19 years) I• ootball training = Conditioning; Conditioning = Football training (15 to 19 years) F• The development of: ➢ t actical insight, ‘reading the game’ (12 to 19 years) ➢ i ndependent problem-solving (12 to 19 years) ➢ c reative individual play (8 to 19 years) ... which are vital elements. F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  21. 21. FFA Curriculum FrameworkThe Curriculum structure diagram below details the associated web-based links that form the practicalcomponent of the two development streams.In the Community Player and Coach Development section there are links that will be accessible during2009. These will include: • 2S: A web-based tool with access to more than 1,600 training exercises. S From this platform there will be preselected exercises conveniently organised for the specific age group characteristics • SSF: Brochures, information and training DVDs relevant to Optus Small Sided Football O • –4–3–3 formation: Information on the 1–4–3–3 system for community coaches 1 • kills test: Introduction of skill tests to reinforce attention to skill development. SThe Talented Player and Coach Development section will have a sequential program specificallydesigned by the FFA Technical Department that provides in-depth information and practices for thetalented player and coach. This section will only be accessible to an identified number of coaches thatare responsible for the development of players in the talented player pathway.National Curriculum Structure NATIONAL CURRICULUM Community Player and Coach Development Program links to: Talented Player and Coach Development Program links to: • S2S exercises • Functional game skills and skills transfer • OSSF brochure • Passing drills general • OSSF DVD specific • Skills test • Positioning games basic • OSSF training DVD advanced • 1–4–3–3 • Training games basic advanced • Game training basic advanced • 1–4–3–3 F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  22. 22. FFA National Curriculum | 21FFA Curriculum Framework 19 Football conditioning Advanced game training Advanced positioning games Specific passing drills 16 Advanced training games Preselected S2S exercises for community program Basic game training Positioning games (basic or advanced) General passing drills 12 Training games (basic or advanced) Preselected S2S exercises for community program Basic positioning games Basic training games Functional game skills + Skill transfer 8 years Preselected S2S exercises for community program The pyramid above represents the age group focus of the Community and Talented Player Pathway programs. As the players progress up the pyramid the online links provide specific examples of practices that are relative to their development stage. F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  23. 23. FFA Curriculum FrameworkThe following diagrams represent the total structure of the National Curriculum. The two year age group blocks detail the specific development objectivesrelated to the mental and physical development phases. Learning to master the ball U/6–U/7 No formation / tactics consist of only very Getting a ‘TIC’ 4x4 general instructions for football Learning to act with the ball purposefully U/8–U/9 7x7 1–3–3 formation / basic tactical instructions / everyone plays all positions TIC Learning to play together purposefully U/10–U/11 9x9 1–3–2–3 formation / limited tactical instructions / talent for specific positions more clear (but still flexible) TI C Learning the positions and basic tasks in 11 v 11 U/12–U/13 11 x 11 1–4–3–3 formation: Extending tactical instruction explaining the positions and basic tasks TIC Learning how the basic tasks link together U/14–U/15 11 x 11 1–4–3–3 formation: Choice / specialising for a position + corresponding tactical instruction TIC Learning how to play as a team U/16–U/17 1–4–3–3 formation: Extending development on one 11 x 11 position related to the team’s output Football Conditioning Performing / winning as a team U/18–U/19 1–4–3–3 formation: Perfection per position and as 11 x 11 a team: result-oriented team-work Football Conditioning F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  24. 24. FFA National Curriculum | 23FFA Curriculum Framework Learning to master the ball U/6–U/7 No formation / tactics consist of only very Getting a ‘TIC’ 4x4 general instructions for footballGeneral Description the ball Learning to act with V purposefully• ery short concentration span U/8–U/9 7x7 Relevant formation / basic tactical instructions / 1–3–3 Training Content everyone plays all positions • ll sorts of FUN games involving ball mastering / A Remarks Links to: TIC TI• uickly distracted (they notice a ‘little of a lot’) Q running with the ball (if possible, each child with Learning to play together U/10–U/11 1–3–2–3 formation / limited tactical instructions / talent S2S ➢• purposefully T hey all want to have the ball (even take the ball from 9x9 a ball) C for specific positions more clear (but still flexible) ➢ OSSF training DVD a teammate) • ll sorts of small sided games, 1 v 1, 2 v 2, A TIC 3 v 3 and 4 v 4 ➢ Skills test.• Learning the positions and N o ability yet for team play U/12–U/13 1–4–3–3 formation: Extending tactical instruction basic tasks in 11 v 11 11 x 11 • explaining the positions andno longer than 10 T he various games should last basic tasks• ot able to pass / make combinations (do not try to N minutes and appeal to the children’s fantasy change this!) TIC • 1–4–3–3 formation: Choice / specialising for a position N o ‘queue’ exercises• Learning how the basic tasksrules ble to understand very simple A U/14–U/15 link together 11 x 11 • + o stretching corresponding tactical instruction N• ble to understand very basic coaching like ‘stay A inside the field’ ‘do not use your hands’ ‘go with the • umber of sessions per week: 2 (+ 1 game). N Learning how to play as a team ball to the goal’ etc. U/16–U/17 1–4–3–3 formation: Extending development on one • aximum duration per training session M 11 x 11 position related to the team’s output Football Conditioning• earning through trial and error L = 45 minutes–1hour• he biggest challenge is discovering how to control T Performing / winning as a team U/18–U/19 1–4–3–3 formation: Perfection per position and as that rolling and bouncing ‘round thing’ with your feet. 11 x 11 a team: result-oriented team-work Football Conditioning F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  25. 25. FFA Curriculum Framework Learning to master the ball U/6–U/7 No formation / tactics consist of only very Getting a ‘TIC’ 4x4 general instructions for football Learning to act with the ball purposefully U/8–U/9 7x7 1–3–3 formation / basic tactical instructions / everyone plays all positions TIC Learning to play togetherGeneral Description purposefully U/10–U/11 9x9• he players now understand that the game’s purpose T Relevant Training Content tactical instructions / talent 1–3–2–3 formation / limited Remarks for specific positions more clear (but still flexible) • all mastery (during the warm up). B Links to: TI C TIC is winning by scoring more goals than their opponent Learning the positions and U/12–U/13 • 1–4–3–3 formation: Extending tactical instruction R unning with the ball, 1 v 1, shooting, passing and ➢ S2S• basic tasks in 11 v 11 S till a lot of individual play but the players start to 11 x 11 explainingfirst touch in various short FUN games. receiving, the positions and basic tasks ➢ OSSF training DVD understand that acting with the ball purposefully is • ariations of 4 v 4 and 7 v 7. V TIC necessary in order to be successful ➢ Skills test Learning how the basic tasks U/14–U/15 • 1–4–3–3 formation: Choice / specialising for a position N o ‘queue’ exercises.• link together N ow playing 7 v 7 on a pitch, ‘feeling’ for team play, 11 x 11 + corresponding tactical instruction direction and opponent is developing • o stretching N• Learning how to play as a team P reference and talent for a specific position starts to U/16–U/17 • 1–4–3–3 formation: Extending development on one N umber of sessions per week: 2–3 (+ 1 game) show (but encourage everyone to still play in every 11 x 11 • position related to the team’s output M aximum duration per training session = 1 hour Football Conditioning position regularly!)• Performing / winning as a team B U/18–U/19 igger goals with goalkeepers automatically appeals 1–4–3–3 formation: Perfection per position and as to aiming and shooting 11 x 11 a team: result-oriented team-work Football Conditioning F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  26. 26. FFA National Curriculum | 25 Learning to master the ball U/6–U/7 No formation / tactics consist of only very Getting a ‘TIC’FFA Curriculum Framework x 4 4 general instructions for football Learning to act with the ball purposefully U/8–U/9 7x7 1–3–3 formation / basic tactical instructions / everyone plays all positions TIC Learning to play together purposefully U/10–U/11 9x9 1–3–2–3 formation / limited tactical instructions / talent for specific positions more clear (but still flexible) TI CGeneral Description and Learning the positions basic tasks in 11 v 11• ore and more understanding and feeling M U/12–U/13 11 x 11 Relevant Training Content 1–4–3–3 formation: Extending tactical instruction Remarks explaining the positions and basic tasks • unctional game skills in possession of the ball: F Links to: TIC TIC for teamwork Passing and receiving, running with the ball, 1 v 1, Learning how the basic tasks U/14–U/15 1–4–3–3 formation: Choice / specialising for a position S2S first touch ➢• link together U nderstanding of individual role in relation to x 11 11 + corresponding tactical instruction ➢ OSSF training DVD teamwork is developing • efensive game skills: 1 v 1; block tackle; sliding D tackle ➢ Skills test• Learning how to play as a team U nderstanding for acting without the ball U/16–U/17 1–4–3–3 formation: Extending development on one (running to or off the ball) develops • position related to the team’s output S kills transfer: Executing the game skills in ➢ Functional game skills 11 x 11 Football Conditioning corresponding game-related situations (1 v 1, 4 v 4, and skills transfer• ith 8 outfield players a tighter and more strict W basic positioning games) ➢ Basic positioning games task allocation is required Performing / winning as a team U/18–U/19 1–4–3–3 formation: Perfection per position and as 11 x 11 • a raining games: Various small sided games to Tteam: result-oriented team-work ➢ BasicFootball Conditioning training games• reference / ability for specific positions becomes P develop ball possession objectives. clearer and clearer Transitioning:• erfect mental and physical ability for developing P motor skills. • earning the general principles in training games. L Dynamic stretching in warming up: • umber of sessions per week: 3 (+ 1 game) N • aximum duration per training session M = 75 minutes. F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  27. 27. Learning to master the ball U/6–U/7 No formation / tactics consist of only very Getting a ‘TIC’ 4x4 general instructions for football Learning to act with the ballFFA Curriculum Framework x 7 purposefully U/8–U/9 7 1–3–3 formation / basic tactical instructions / everyone plays all positions TIC Learning to play together purposefully U/10–U/11 9x9 1–3–2–3 formation / limited tactical instructions / talent for specific positions more clear (but still flexible) TI C Learning the positions and basic tasks in 11 v 11 U/12–U/13 11 x 11 1–4–3–3 formation: Extending tactical instruction explaining the positions and basic tasks TICGeneral Description Learning how the basic tasks link together U/14–U/15 11 x 11• deal mental and physical conditions in this age group I Relevant Training Content / specialising for a position 1–4–3–3 formation: Choice + corresponding tactical instruction Remarks • unctional game skills and skills transfer (special F Links to: TIC attention for passing drills and heading)• Learning how to play as a team F irst high point in the learning of motor skills, well U/16–U/17 1–4–3–3 formation: Extending development on one ➢ S2S built/ideal proportions, good coordination 11 x 11 • position related to the team’s output P ositioning games: the primal forms (basic) ➢ –4–3–3 formation 1 Football Conditioning• ocially aware, critical of own performance and that S • raining games T ➢ Basic game training of others Performing / winning as a team U/18–U/19 • 1–4–3–3 formation: Perfection per position and as 1 –4–3–3 game training (basic formation) ➢ Basic positioning games• ikes to compete and compare L 11 x 11 a team: result-oriented team-work Football Conditioning • unctional game skills and skills transfer in F ➢ Basic training games• mitates idols I possession of the ball ➢ General passing drills.• he start of playing 11 v 11 on the whole pitch with T • efensive functional game skills and skills transfer. D ‘real’ game rules demands a big reorientation on Transitioning: almost all aspects that were learned in earlier phases • earning the general principles in training games and L• ocus on learning the positions and basic tasks in F 1–4–3–3 game training. playing 11 v 11 in a 1–4–3–3 formation Dynamic stretching in warming up: • umber of sessions per week: 3–4 (+ 1 game) N • aximum duration per training session M = 75 minutes. F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M
  28. 28. Learning to act with the ball purposefully U/8–U/9 7x7 1–3–3 formation / basic tactical instructions / everyone plays all positions TIC FFA National Curriculum | 27 Learning to play togetherFFA Curriculum Framework x 9 purposefully U/10–U/11 9 1–3–2–3 formation / limited tactical instructions / talent for specific positions more clear (but still flexible) TI C Learning the positions and basic tasks in 11 v 11 U/12–U/13 11 x 11 1–4–3–3 formation: Extending tactical instruction explaining the positions and basic tasks TIC Learning how the basic tasks link together U/14–U/15 11 x 11 1–4–3–3 formation: Choice / specialising for a position + corresponding tactical instruction TICGeneral Description as a team Learning how to play U/16–U/17 Relevant Training Content 1–4–3–3 formation: Extending development on one Remarks 11 x 11 position related to the team’s output• re-adolescence: Obstinate, rebels against authority P • unctional game skills and passing drills (basic) F Links to: Football Conditioning and provokes conflicts Performing / winning as a team U/18–U/19 • 1–4–3–3 formation: Perfection per position and as ➢ P ositioning games (basic) S2S• elf-overestimating and self-absorbed S 11 x 11 • a raining games (basic) team-work Tteam: result-oriented ➢ –4–3–3 formation 1 Football Conditioning• evelopment of other interests and hobbies, D • –4–3–3 game training (basic). 1 ➢ Basic game training reassesses the place of football in his / her life and sometimes puts it into another perspective Transitioning: ➢ Basic game training• udden big increase in height limits physical capacity S • n training games, positioning games and 1–4–3–3 I ➢ ositioning games (basic P (injury prone) game training. or advanced)• tagnation or regression of coordination (clumsy) S Others: ➢ raining games (basic or T • ynamic stretching and core stability exercises D advanced)• n this phase the intellectual learning ability is bigger I than the physical learning ability • umber of sessions per week: 4 (+ 1 game) N ➢ General passing drills. • aximum duration per training session M = 75–90 minutes. F FA N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M

×