Social Media - Making Friends & Influencing People

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A simple guide to using social media for brands

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  • A simple guide to Social Media Marketing, for people who don't live it every day.
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  • Very informative presentation, thank you for sharing. In social media conversation is indeed king, after all what for it was called a social media if those engaging to it doesn't converse. It is truly about making friends and influencing hence using social media as a marketing strategy, businessmen must remember that they must interact before they promote their brands.
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Social Media - Making Friends & Influencing People

  1. 1. make
friends how
to
 
influence
people
 and BBH
Asia‐Pacific’s
guide
 to
harnessing
the
power 
 of
engagement
marke;ng 

  2. 2. THE
RATIONALE
 Social
media
con;nue
to
a>ract
more
buzz
than
a
stadium
full 
of
vuvuzelas
–
here’s
why:
 •  Social
media
sites
have
more
than
1
billion
users
worldwide
1
 •  Facebook
alone
has
more
than
640
million
users
2
 •  QQ
is
nearly
as
big,
with
635
million
users
in
China
alone
3
 •  In
March
2011,
Facebook
has
nearly
150
million
 users
across
Asia,
with
1.5
million
new
users
 joining
in
the
past
month
alone
4
 •  Consultancy
Vitrue
calculated
that
each
one
of
a
 brand’s
fans
on
Facebook
is
worth
the
equivalent
 of
US$3.60
in
earned
media
value
5
SOURCES:
1.
ESTIMATE
BASED
ON
REPORTED
USER
FIGURES
FROM
VARIOUS
SOCIAL
NETWORKS;
2.
FACEBOOK;
3.
TENCENT;
4.
SOCIALBAKERS;
5.
VITRUE.COM


  3. 3. THE
NEXT
FRONTIER
With
compelling
numbers
like
these,
the
key
ques;on
has
evolved
from
‘why
should
we
consider
social
media?’
to
‘how
can
we
harness
its
potenPal?’
 The
first
step
is
to
see
social
media
for
what
they
are:
 an
addi@on
to
all
the
exis;ng
ways
we
can
interact
 with
people
and
share
value
with
them.
Cri;cally,
they’re
not
a
silver
bullet:
social
media

won’t
replace
other
media,
won’t
make
a
bad

product

good,
and
won’t
perform
any
‘magic’;

they’re
simply
one
more
(albeit
very
powerful)
tool
we
can
use
when
it’s
appropriate
to
do
so.

  4. 4. 10commandments
 
 of
engagement

 marke@ng

  5. 5. ENGAGEMENT
MARKETING
101
1.  Start
with
people,
not
technology
2.  Create
conversa@ons,
not
campaigns
3.  Use
content
to
inspire
discussion
4.  Deliver
real
value
to
audiences
5.  Listen
before
you
talk
6.  Tell
people
about
your
efforts
7.  Be
prepared
for
awkward
situa@ons
 
 018.  Be
responsive
and
adapt
as
you
go
 19.  Take
things
slow
and
steady
10.  Be
in
it
for
the
long
term

  6. 6. 1.
PEOPLE,
NOT
TECHNOLOGY
Facebook,
Qzone
and
TwiUer
aren’t
the
answer;
they’re
simply
ways
of
implemenPng
the
answer.
People
flock
to
these
social
networks
because
they
perceive
value
in
what
they
offer.
 That
value
is
most
likely
social
engagement:
the
 opportunity
to
talk
with
their
friends
and
share
 things
that
ma>er
to
them
–
photos,
videos,
links,
 their
moods
and
observa;ons
on
the
world,
etc.
Understanding
their
mo;va;ons
is
key
to
understanding
how
we
can
add
value
to
our
audiences
and
be
a
welcome

part
of
their
social
media
experience.

  7. 7. “Content
isnt
king.
If
I
sent
you
to
a
desert 
island
and
gave
you
the
choice
of
taking 
your
friends
or
your
movies,
youd
choose
your
friends
‐
if
you
chose
the
movies,
wed 
call
you
a
sociopath.
Conversa@on
is
king. 
Content
is
just
something
to
talk
about.” 
 Cory
Doctorow

  8. 8. 2.
CONVERSATIONS
NOT
CAMPAIGNS
 The
tradi;onal
brand
communica;on
model
relies
 on
a>en;on‐grabbing
tac;cs
to
win
people’s
 a>en;on,
but
does
li>le
to
sustain
that
a>en;on
 once
the
‘campaign’
is
over.
 However,
this
leads
to
periods
of
diminished
engagement,
 when
brands
can
lose
value
and
compe;tors
can
close
in.
 However,
by
supplemen;ng
these
‘fireworks’
with
 more
in;mate
‘campfire’
conversa;ons*,
brands

 can
sustain
engagement
over
longer
periods
of

 ;me,
while
adding
addi;onal
value
to

 rela;onships
with
their
audiences.
*
More
on
this
topic
from
John
Willshire
(@willsh)
here: hUp://bit.ly/1sLMjM

  9. 9. 3.
CONTENT
AS
INSPIRATION
 Having
said
that,
content
is
s;ll
as
important
as
 ever,
but
its
role
must
evolve
to
help
us
take
 advantage
of
new
opportuni;es.
Its
contribu;on
shibs
to
inspiring
conversa;ons
–

crea;ng
‘water
cooler’
moments
that
give
people

something
to
talk
about
and
enrich
their
own

rela;onships.
We
can
s;ll
share
content
in
tradi;onal,
mass‐
broadcast
channels
when
appropriate;
the
key
change
is
crea;ng
that
content
with
an
end
goal

of
conversa;ons
in
mind.

  10. 10. 4.
SIZE
ISN’T
EVERYTHING
As
we
shib
our
focus
away
from
an
‘interrup;on’
model,
brands
will
no
longer
need
to
rely
on
high‐impact
ac;vi;es.
Something
as
simple
as
a
short
status
update
can
s;mulate
considerable
levels
of
conversa;on
and
build
brand
affinity.
Similarly,
short
video
clips
with
modest
produc;on
quality
are
perfectly
suitable
on
social
sites,
dependent
on
the
task
they’re
designed
to
address.
Even
‘user‐generated
content’
can
work.
The
trick
is
to
share
only
content
that
adds
value
from

the
audience’s
perspec;ve,
and
recognise
that

there
are
many
poten;al
ways
to
do
this
–
from

epic
TVCs
through
to
simple
replies
to
Facebook
comments.

  11. 11. 5.
LISTENING
IS
THE
NEW
TALKING
In
spite
of
some
latent
fears
around
privacy,
ac;ve
users
of
social
networking
sites
tend
to
share
a

wealth
of
valuable
informa;on
about
their
interests,

habits,
and
brand
preferences.
Such
informa;on
is
oben
worth
just
as
much
(and
some;mes
more
than)
expensive
market
research.
And
as
with
many
areas
of
social
media,
the
only
cost
in
taking
advantage
of
it
is
the
;me
it
takes
for
someone
to
collect
and
analyse
it.
However,
to
con;nue
to
benefit
from
these
insights,

brands
must
earn
the
trust
of
their
audiences,
and
only
use
shared
informa;on
to
mutual
advantage.

  12. 12. 6.
LET
THEM
KNOW
YOU
EXIST
No
ma>er
how
well
though‐out
or
engaging
a
brand’s
social
networking
presence
is,
it
can’t
achieve
its
objec;ves
unless
people
know
it’s
there
and
how
to
find
it.
Raising
awareness
of
your
social
media
property
and
highligh;ng
the
value
it
can
add
to
its
intended
audience
are
the
cri;cal
first
steps
on
the
path
to
success.
Crucially,
people
need
to
understand
why
they
should
give
you
any
of
their
;me
–
as
with

everything
else
in
marke;ng,
that
must
be
about
their
needs
first,
not
the
brand’s.

  13. 13. 7.
BE
PREPARED
Brands
can’t
expect
to
please
all
of
the
people,
all
of
the
;me.
Inevitably,
something,
somewhere
will
go
wrong.
The
trick
is
to
accept
this
reality,
and
be

prepared
for
when
it
happens.
This
means
having
a
clearly
ar;culated
alert

and
response
process
that
ensures
the
right

people
can
deliver
the
right
reac;ons
in
the

right
places
at
the
right
;mes.
Although
such
processes
won’t
prevent
problems,
they
can
mi;gate
the
risks,
and
avoid
molehills
becoming
mountains.

  14. 14. 8.
READY,
FIRE,
AIM
Because
they
are
a
‘real‐;me’
medium,
social

networking
sites
allow
brands
to
become
highly

responsive
in
their
communica;ons.
Best
of
all,
social
media
provide
the
perfect
environment
for
a
‘test‐and‐learn’
approach
–
trying
a
variety
of
different
approaches
and
tac;cs
at
minimal
cost,
and
adap;ng
the
overall
strategy
to
make
best
use
of
the
subsequent
results.
 Building
an
experienced,
dedicated
team
to
look
 aber
the
brand’s
social
media
ac;vi;es
ensures
 it
can
take
advantage
of
every
opportunity,
 however
tac;cal
or
transitory.

  15. 15. MEASURING
UP
The
key
to
making
the
most
of
that
‘test‐and‐learn’
opportunity
is
knowing
what
we
set
out
to
achieve
in
the
first
place.
While
there
are
no
‘right’
or
‘wrong’
metrics
when
it
comes
to
measuring
social
engagement,
every
brand
should
set
clear
and
realis;c
goals
for
what
it
expects
its
social
ac;vi;es
to
do.
Simple
before‐and‐aber
measurements
of
the
relevant
metrics
will
provide
enough
insight
into
whether
ac;vi;es
are
doing
what
you
hope
–
and
best
of
all,
you
can
gain
these
insights
through
the
same
social
channels
at
only
a
modest
cost.

  16. 16. “You
can’t
hurry
love, 
 No,
you
just
have
to
wait;
 Love
don’t
come
easy, 
It’s
a
game
of
give
and
take” 
 The
Supremes
(1966)

  17. 17. 9.
ONE
STEP
AT
A
TIME
Few
brands
(if
any)
will
achieve
overnight
success
in
social
media;
deep,
meaningful
rela;onships
take
;me
to
build.
However,
the
rewards
are
well
worth
the
effort.
 Crucially,
though,
we
need
to
take
things
at
a
pace
 the
audience
is
comfortable
with.
Some;mes,
they’ll 
 ini;ate
that
rela;onship
for
us,
crea;ng
their
own
 brand
‘fan’
pages.
Other
;mes,
it
may
take
many
months
to
build
the
desired
momentum.
However,
this
is
a
long‐term

medium,
so
that’s
fine
–
provided

the
audience
perceive
value
in
what

you’re
doing,
it’s
all
worthwhile.

  18. 18. 10.
SOCIAL
ENGAGEMENT
IS
FOR
LIFE…
Brands
can’t
achieve
success
in
social
media
by

dipping
in
and
dipping
out
–
it’s
a
long‐term

commitment
that
requires
con;nuous
effort.
However,
as
with
all
valuable
rela;onships,
that
extra

commitment
will
likely
deliver
correlated
rewards
too.
 
 $ Cri;cally,
though,
brands
should
remember
that
social
 media
are
a
business
investment,
and
must
ul;mately
 build
the
brand’s
value
if
they
are
to
jus;fy
their
place
 in
the
marke;ng
mix.

As
such,
it’s
paramount
that
brands
iden;fy
the
best
people
and
partners
to
help
bring
their
ac;vi;es
to
life.

  19. 19. Simon
Kemp
Engagement
Planner,
BBH
Asia‐Pacific
 simon.kemp@bbh‐asiapac.com.sg
 @eskimon


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