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Theory of planned behaviour cognitions do not    predict change in fruit and vegetable                consumption         ...
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Kothe - EHPS - Theory of planned behaviour cognitions do not predict change in fruit and vegetable consumption

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Kothe - EHPS - Theory of planned behaviour cognitions do not predict change in fruit and vegetable consumption

  1. 1. Theory of planned behaviour cognitions do not predict change in fruit and vegetable consumption Emily Kothe & Barbara Mullan School of Psychology, The University of Sydney, Australia emily.kothe@sydney.edu.au & barbara.mullan@sydney.edu.auAbstract Results Results (cont).Background The present study investigated whether Theory of planned behaviour accounted for 17% oftheory of planned behaviour (TPB) cognitions variance in fruit and vegetable intake at baseline.predicted change in fruit and vegetable intake in a trialcohort of Australian young adults. Attitude Theory of planned behaviour accounted for 24% of T1 variance in fruit and vegetable intake at follow-up.Methods Participants of a randomised controlled trialof a TPB-based intervention (N=162) completed Theory of planned behaviour accounted for just 2.3%questionnaires assessing fruit and vegetable intake of variance in change in fruit and vegetableand TPB constructs at baseline and 30 days. consumption. Fruit andFindings The theory of planned behaviour predicted Subjective .42 Intention .37 vegetablefruit and vegetable consumption at baseline and norm Conclusion T1 intakefollow-up. Change in attitude, perceived behavioural T1control and subjective norm predicted change in T1intention, but change intention and perceived Failure of the theory to predict change in fruit andbehavioural control failed to predict change in fruit and vegetable consumption may reflect artefacts of thevegetable intake study design. PerceivedDiscussion Failure of the theory to predict behaviour behavioural However, the lack of support for the theory of plannedchange may be due to the inadequacy of the theory or control behaviour when applied to the modelling of behaviourto artefacts of the study design that facilitate change in T1 change is consistent with a other recent interventionfruit and vegetable consumption without corresponding studies based on the theory.5changes in cognitions. Researchers should becautious when interpreting empirical support for the Researchers should not assume that theories thatpredictive utility of the TPB as evidence the theory can Figure 1. Theory of planned behaviour variables successfully predict behaviour (either crosssectionallybe applied to behaviour change. predicted fruit and vegetable consumption at T1 or prospectively) will adequately model change in beta weights shown, significant paths in dark blue behaviour.Introduction More research on the mediation of behaviour change through theory relevant pathways are needed to Attitude confirm or clarify these findings. T2Australian young adults are less likely than any otherage group to consume adequate quantities of fruit and Acknowledgmentsvegetables.1The theory of planned behaviour has previously been Fruit andfound to predict a large proportion of the variance in Subjective .40 Intention .18 vegetableintake in this population. 2,3,4 norm T2 intake T2 T2ObjectivesTo determine whether change in fruit and vegetable Perceivedconsumption in the FreshFacts study could be behaviouralexplained by change in theory of planned behaviour controlcognitions. T2Methods Figure 2. Theory of planned behaviour variables predicted fruit and vegetable consumption at T2 beta weights shown, significant paths in dark blue This research would not have been possible withoutUniversity undergraduates (N=162) completed atheory of planned behaviour intervention designed to the support of staff and students at the University ofincrease fruit and vegetable intake. Sydney. The researchers would especially like to thank Vanessa Allom, Kirby Sainsbury, Jemma Todd, AlyssaParticipants were randomised to either the intervention Milton and Kristina Xavier. Attitudeor control conditions. changeAll participants completed a theory of planned Referencesbehaviour questionnaire and a self-report measure offruit and vegetable consumption at baseline andimmediate post-intervention follow-up (Day 30). 1. Australian Bureau of Statistics. National Nutrition Change in Survey. Canberra 1997 Subjective .14 .03 fruit and Baseline norm Intention vegetable 2. Allom V, Mullan B. Self-regulation versus habit: The influence of self-schema on fruit and vegetable change assessment intake consumption. Psychology & Health. 2011. 3. Kothe EJ, Mullan B, Butow P. Promoting fruit and (n=180) vegetable consumption: Testing an intervention based on the theory of planned behaviour. Appetite. Perceived 2012;58(3). 4. Collins A, Mullan B. An extension of the theory of Control Intervention behavioural control planned behavior to predict immediate hedonic change behaviors and distal benefit behaviors. Food (n=90) (n=90) Quality and Preference. 2011;22(7). 5. Hardeman W, Kinmonth AL, Michie S, Sutton S. Theory of planned behaviour cognitions do not Follow-up assessment Figure 3. Change in theory of planned behaviour variables did not predict change in fruit and vegetable predict self reported or objective physical activity levels or change in the ProActive trial. British consumption Journal of Health Psychology. 2011;16(1):135-50. (n=162) beta weights shown, significant paths in dark blue

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