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Kothe - ASBHM - Explaining Changes In Fruit And Vegetable Consumption Using The Theory Of Planned Behaviour

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Explaining Changes In Fruit And Vegetable Consumption Using The Theory Of Planned Behaviour:
The Fresh Facts Trial

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Kothe - ASBHM - Explaining Changes In Fruit And Vegetable Consumption Using The Theory Of Planned Behaviour

  1. 1. EXPLAINING CHANGES IN FRUITAND VEGETABLE CONSUMPTIONUSING THE THEORY OFPLANNED BEHAVIOUR:THE FRESH FACTS TRIALEMILY KOTHE
  2. 2. BACKGROUNDoAustralian young adults are less likely than any other age group to consume adequate quantities of fruit and vegetables.1oThe theory of planned behaviour has previously been found to predict a large proportion of the variance in intake in this population. 2,3,4oTo determine whether change in fruit and vegetable consumption in the FreshFacts study could be explained by change in theory of planned behaviour cognitions
  3. 3. METHODoUniversity undergraduates (N=162) completed a theory of planned behaviour intervention designed to increase fruit and vegetable intake.oParticipants were randomised to either the intervention or control conditions.oAll participants completed a theory of planned behaviour questionnaire and a self-report measure of fruit and vegetable consumption at baseline and immediate post- intervention follow-up (Day 30).
  4. 4. METHOD Baseline assessment (n=180) Control Intervention (n=90) (n=90) Follow-up assessment (n=162)
  5. 5. FRUIT AND VEG @ T1• Theory of planned behaviour accounted for 24% of variance in fruit and vegetable intake at baseline. Attitude .42 .37 Fruit and Subjective Norm Intention vegetable intake Perceived behavioural control
  6. 6. FRUIT AND VEG @ T2• Theory of planned behaviour accounted for 17% of variance in fruit and vegetable intake at follow-up. Attitude .40 .18 Fruit and Subjective Norm Intention vegetable intake Perceived behavioural control
  7. 7. CHANGE IN FRUIT AND VEG• Theory of planned behaviour accounted for just 2.3% of variance in change in fruit and vegetable consumption. Attitude .11 .03 Fruit and Subjective Norm Intention vegetable intake Perceived behavioural control
  8. 8. CONCLUSIONSoTheory of planned behaviour did not predict change in fruit and vegetable consumptionoFailure of the theory to predict change in fruit and vegetable consumption may reflect artifacts of the study design.oHowever, these results are consist with other recent studies based on the theory.5
  9. 9. FUTURE DIRECTIONSoResearchers should not assume that theories that successfully predict behaviour (either cross-sectionally or prospectively) will adequately model change in behaviour.oMore research on the mediation of behaviour change through theory relevant pathways are needed to confirm or clarify these findings.
  10. 10. THANK YOUemily.kothe@deakin.edu.au

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