Challenges for private companion animal vets    (and incidentally also welfare groups)Ray Butcher      ICAWC, RIGA 2011
   Reflects my own    experiences – largely UK    based   Old enough to remember    the “old days”   Unique position – ...
   Evolution of companion    animal vet practice in UK    and worldwide   Changing situation in    welfare charities   ...
Thames flood 1953
   Intensive agriculture
   Development of    companion animal    practice   Vet nurse training   Changing client    demands and    expectations
   Massive investment in terms    of money and facilities   Change in attitudes of vets    and staff – women, work/life ...
   Emphasis on    positive health care    and prevention    rather than treating    disease   In UK – much of    this do...
   Trend to specialisation    ◦ Species    ◦ Disciplines
   Evolution of Nursing    Profession   Working with other    animal health    professionals –    physios, behaviourists...
   Continued change in    client expectations (not    related to costs only)   Reduced standing of    “professions”   E...
   Not to illicit sympathy!   Stress practice is a    business   This is what we do to    feed our families   Making a...
   Private registered    Hospital   50 staff   Image important as a    “service provider”
   Internet   Meetings   networking
   Accidents and disease   Positive animal health   Family health   Community Health
   Well-meaning but    lacking overall plan   Dealing with crises    but doing nothing to    change anything long    ter...
   Thought they could    solve the problem    themselves   Unwilling to work    with others   Own welfare    standards ...
   Many examples   Become professional >    successful as businesses   Staff make up - range of    professionals -not  ...
   Re-homing – not just    numbers but matching    the right dog to the    family   CNR – community    involvement, stre...
   Also important   Caring but professional   “Playing the system”
   Internet   Meetings   networking
VET                                         LocalPractice                                     Charities                   ...
   Aims and objectives much in common   Challenges much in common   Much greater cooperation at international /    nati...
   Promotion of humanity – concern for all living    things (including people)   Professional   Recognise the importanc...
   Important concept –    control of whole    population not “strays”   Consider “free roaming”    not stray   Image – ...
Free RoamingOwned dogs   LostOwned dogsabandonedOwned dogs wanderingCommunity  Dogs   Feral   Dogs
TOTAL DOG POPULATION              Confined / Controlled                  Free Roaming                                     ...
   Direct physical injury to    humans, their pets or    livestock, and wildlife.   Indirect injury as a result of    ro...
   Loss of human and    animal life   Fear of the disease   Cost / availability of    vaccination   Cost / availabilit...
   ICAM Framework
   Initial data collection and identification of    major stakeholders   Interpretation of the data and identification o...
Human          NGOs          Animals Animal                                         HealthGeneral                         ...
   “….. I promise above all    that I will pursue the work    of my profession with    uprightness of conduct and    that...
   Ensuring animal    welfare is a key    element of our role   Have we risen to the    challenge?
   Moral obligation   EU – Treaty of    Amsterdam > Legal    obligation
   Can we argue that this is an area that will    help to build the business?
55,000 human deaths inAfrica and Asia every year –especially children100 deaths in children everyday
   May include owned    animals that are    allowed to wander   Clients or potential    clients
   Important concept    from “James Herriot”    era.
   Direct involvement   Linked to compulsory    vaccination   Linked to neutering
   May be compulsory    visit to vet   Marketing opportunity
   Pet dogs potentially    most productive   Requires vet    involvement   Cost implications   Needs compromise?
   Responsible Pet    Ownership   Opportunity to    market clinic
   Moral obligation – care of living things and    promoting humanity   Professional obligation – “animal advocate”   P...
   Professional obligation to clients – have    expertise to protect health of pets   Enhanced image as “carer” will imp...
   Goodwill   Image   Community    responsibility   Potential increase in    client base   Developing surgical    ski...
   More satisfied owner   Healthier dog   Better educated owner    > better potential to    take up vet services
   Vets and welfare charities have joint role as    part of “community health care team”
   The need to change the way people behave   Educated public better for animal welfare and    better for vets so “win /...
   Rabies / zoonoses   Bites
   Owners - “My dog doesn’t bite”   Sponsors &Vets – not keen on negative image                                         ...
   Problem of                                            communicating a                                            “FEAR...
   Improved welfare involves educating people    to change their attitudes and behaviour   Can only be successful if mul...
Human          NGOs          Animals Animal                                         HealthGeneral                         ...
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets
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ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets

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ICAWC 2011: Ray Butcher - From Herriot to the Present - the Challenges for Vets

  1. 1. Challenges for private companion animal vets (and incidentally also welfare groups)Ray Butcher ICAWC, RIGA 2011
  2. 2.  Reflects my own experiences – largely UK based Old enough to remember the “old days” Unique position – have been a high profile vet “politician” / involved in welfare charities / a private practitioner all at the same time
  3. 3.  Evolution of companion animal vet practice in UK and worldwide Changing situation in welfare charities Parallel evolution but prejudices perhaps rooted in the past (esp at local level) Stress the need for collaboration Pointers for the future
  4. 4. Thames flood 1953
  5. 5.  Intensive agriculture
  6. 6.  Development of companion animal practice Vet nurse training Changing client demands and expectations
  7. 7.  Massive investment in terms of money and facilities Change in attitudes of vets and staff – women, work/life balance Employment and Health and Safety legislation Competition Facing the reality that practice is a business
  8. 8.  Emphasis on positive health care and prevention rather than treating disease In UK – much of this done by nurses
  9. 9.  Trend to specialisation ◦ Species ◦ Disciplines
  10. 10.  Evolution of Nursing Profession Working with other animal health professionals – physios, behaviourists etc. Still barriers in some countries
  11. 11.  Continued change in client expectations (not related to costs only) Reduced standing of “professions” Economic crisis > impact on own business as well as clients
  12. 12.  Not to illicit sympathy! Stress practice is a business This is what we do to feed our families Making a profit is desirable – indeed essential!! Difficult decisions What is best for welfare?
  13. 13.  Private registered Hospital 50 staff Image important as a “service provider”
  14. 14.  Internet Meetings networking
  15. 15.  Accidents and disease Positive animal health Family health Community Health
  16. 16.  Well-meaning but lacking overall plan Dealing with crises but doing nothing to change anything long term Care about animals more than people Often felt abandoned by society
  17. 17.  Thought they could solve the problem themselves Unwilling to work with others Own welfare standards in own facilities often substandard
  18. 18.  Many examples Become professional > successful as businesses Staff make up - range of professionals -not necessarily “animal people” Alliances > cooperation > bigger political clout Educational programmes essential component
  19. 19.  Re-homing – not just numbers but matching the right dog to the family CNR – community involvement, stressing aftercare Every intervention is an education opportunity
  20. 20.  Also important Caring but professional “Playing the system”
  21. 21.  Internet Meetings networking
  22. 22. VET LocalPractice Charities 1950 - 1985: Identifying new challenges Economic pressures Rapidly changing societal needs 1985 – 2011: Reality check: Business plans Re-focusing aims and objectives Professionalism
  23. 23.  Aims and objectives much in common Challenges much in common Much greater cooperation at international / national level May still be “in-built prejudices (esp at local level) ◦ Vets - “Only interested in money”, “Do not care about animals” ◦ Charities - un-realistic expectations, “mad”, Poor standards of welfare
  24. 24.  Promotion of humanity – concern for all living things (including people) Professional Recognise the importance of considering and working with other stakeholders (including locals) “One medicine” philosophy
  25. 25.  Important concept – control of whole population not “strays” Consider “free roaming” not stray Image – “stray” > unwanted/expendable
  26. 26. Free RoamingOwned dogs LostOwned dogsabandonedOwned dogs wanderingCommunity Dogs Feral Dogs
  27. 27. TOTAL DOG POPULATION Confined / Controlled Free Roaming LOST Owned dogs Returned LostDogs in breeding / commercial Owned dogs Abandonment abandoned supply chain Owned Re-homing Owned dogs Dogs wandering Culture Community Education??? Dogs Feral Dogs
  28. 28.  Direct physical injury to humans, their pets or livestock, and wildlife. Indirect injury as a result of road traffic accidents Reservoir of disease to humans and their pets Pollution from faeces, urine etc General nuisance - noise
  29. 29.  Loss of human and animal life Fear of the disease Cost / availability of vaccination Cost / availability of post exposure therapy (PET)
  30. 30.  ICAM Framework
  31. 31.  Initial data collection and identification of major stakeholders Interpretation of the data and identification of local priorities Consideration of potential components of strategy Agreement of overall plan, setting aims and objectives and delegation of tasks Implementation, monitoring and evaluation
  32. 32. Human NGOs Animals Animal HealthGeneral Health Ministry EducatorsPublic Vets Ministry Municipality
  33. 33.  “….. I promise above all that I will pursue the work of my profession with uprightness of conduct and that my constant endeavour will be to ensure the welfare of the animals committed to my care”.
  34. 34.  Ensuring animal welfare is a key element of our role Have we risen to the challenge?
  35. 35.  Moral obligation EU – Treaty of Amsterdam > Legal obligation
  36. 36.  Can we argue that this is an area that will help to build the business?
  37. 37. 55,000 human deaths inAfrica and Asia every year –especially children100 deaths in children everyday
  38. 38.  May include owned animals that are allowed to wander Clients or potential clients
  39. 39.  Important concept from “James Herriot” era.
  40. 40.  Direct involvement Linked to compulsory vaccination Linked to neutering
  41. 41.  May be compulsory visit to vet Marketing opportunity
  42. 42.  Pet dogs potentially most productive Requires vet involvement Cost implications Needs compromise?
  43. 43.  Responsible Pet Ownership Opportunity to market clinic
  44. 44.  Moral obligation – care of living things and promoting humanity Professional obligation – “animal advocate” Professional obligation to community – have expertise to improve public health
  45. 45.  Professional obligation to clients – have expertise to protect health of pets Enhanced image as “carer” will impact on view of community to clinic Potential opportunity to market clinic with increase workload and client base
  46. 46.  Goodwill Image Community responsibility Potential increase in client base Developing surgical skills? Financial gain?
  47. 47.  More satisfied owner Healthier dog Better educated owner > better potential to take up vet services
  48. 48.  Vets and welfare charities have joint role as part of “community health care team”
  49. 49.  The need to change the way people behave Educated public better for animal welfare and better for vets so “win / win”
  50. 50.  Rabies / zoonoses Bites
  51. 51.  Owners - “My dog doesn’t bite” Sponsors &Vets – not keen on negative image 68
  52. 52.  Problem of communicating a “FEAR message”Witte K. 1996; Cho & Witte, 2005; Gore & Bracken, 2005 69
  53. 53.  Improved welfare involves educating people to change their attitudes and behaviour Can only be successful if multiple stakeholders in the community work to an agreed strategy Each stakeholder group will have their own agenda Maybe historical “baggage” – concentrate on points of common interest / agreement May need compromises Must be perceived advantages to get “buy-in”
  54. 54. Human NGOs Animals Animal HealthGeneral Health Ministry EducatorsPublic Vets Ministry Municipality

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