Cultural Ideals for ePortfolio Practice: Authenticity, Deliberation, and Integrity Darren Cambridge   ePortfolio & Digital...
Three Ideals <ul><li>Authenticity </li></ul><ul><li>Integrity  </li></ul><ul><li>Deliberation  </li></ul>
 
 
Different Paradigms? <ul><li>Expressive: creative, individualized, self as authority </li></ul><ul><li>Standardized: commo...
Authenticity <ul><li>Finding truth through examination of what’s unique about oneself  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rousseau, Rom...
Authenticity in Education <ul><li>Ownership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Let Your Life Speak </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Experient...
 
<ul><li>Essentially, I do not have a religion to cling on to; I’m left with the experience of my life and I try to relate ...
Neutrality as a Consequence <ul><li>Abandonment of “horizons of significance”  </li></ul><ul><li>Validation of choice as a...
 
Critique of Authenticity <ul><li>Expressive: Promotes a culture of atomism and narcissism </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Self-absor...
Necessity of Dialog <ul><li>Without horizons of significance, how do we know which individual differences make a differenc...
 
Integrity <ul><li>Consistency and coherence over time  (lifelong) </li></ul><ul><li>Consistency and coherence across roles...
Psychological Need for Integrity <ul><li>Desire for narrative of the long term in a globalized economy  (Richard Sennett) ...
Three curricula Kathleen Yancey,  Reflection in the Writing Classroom
Good Work has Integrity
From Dialog to Deliberation <ul><li>A portfolio is a message in a rhetorical situation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Audience as w...
Principles of Deliberation <ul><li>Publicity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Deliberative system which informs and holds accountable...
University as  Ethical Learning Organization <ul><li>Authenticity: Help students discover and document what’s important to...
A New Role for Competencies <ul><li>Standardized: Matching performance to a pre-defined set of outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>...
Competencies in Organizational Learning <ul><li>Standardized: Articulating expectations to students </li></ul><ul><li>Deli...
Deliberative Assessment <ul><li>Standardized: Objectivist/utilitarian </li></ul><ul><li>Expressive: Subjectivist/intuition...
New Century College  Competencies <ul><li>Communication </li></ul><ul><li>Critical Thinking </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic Pr...
NCC Graduation Portfolio <ul><li>No predefined standard for what constitutes satisfactory performance in each competency <...
ePortfolio outcomes <ul><li>Demonstrate learning power or learning competencies   (Broadstreet 2006)   </li></ul><ul><ul><...
 
 
 
 
<ul><li>How does the portfolio help students represent their identity as “whole human beings”?  </li></ul><ul><li>How does...
Ideas? <ul><ul><li>Darren Cambridge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>George Mason University  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_...
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Cultural Ideals for ePortfolio Practice: Authenticity, Deliberation, and Integrity

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Keynote presentation at ePortfolio & Digital Identity 2008, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 6, 2008

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Cultural Ideals for ePortfolio Practice: Authenticity, Deliberation, and Integrity

  1. 1. Cultural Ideals for ePortfolio Practice: Authenticity, Deliberation, and Integrity Darren Cambridge ePortfolio & Digital Identity 2008 Montreal, Quebec, Canada May 6, 2008
  2. 2. Three Ideals <ul><li>Authenticity </li></ul><ul><li>Integrity </li></ul><ul><li>Deliberation </li></ul>
  3. 5. Different Paradigms? <ul><li>Expressive: creative, individualized, self as authority </li></ul><ul><li>Standardized: common structure set through institution, objective process of evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>Barrett: Story vs. Test </li></ul>
  4. 6. Authenticity <ul><li>Finding truth through examination of what’s unique about oneself </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rousseau, Romanticism </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Intersection of cultural influences social structures </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Enacting that difference through creative expression </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Aesthetics of the self (Foucault) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Protecting choice as a core value </li></ul>
  5. 7. Authenticity in Education <ul><li>Ownership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Let Your Life Speak </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Experiential learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reflection as reflexive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Self-directed learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Self-authorship </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Creativity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Capturing the learning of diverse students </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Personalization of education </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>End in itself </li></ul></ul>
  6. 9. <ul><li>Essentially, I do not have a religion to cling on to; I’m left with the experience of my life and I try to relate it to my own understanding of truth. That, I suppose, is the essence of spirituality—maybe this is all a blessing in disguise. Echoing so many theorists on minorities and social repression, the struggle to simply be what I am is edifying. Sean Moore </li></ul>
  7. 10. Neutrality as a Consequence <ul><li>Abandonment of “horizons of significance” </li></ul><ul><li>Validation of choice as an end in itself </li></ul><ul><li>Freedom of neutrality </li></ul><ul><li>Procedural justice (Bellah, Habits of the Heart ) </li></ul>
  8. 12. Critique of Authenticity <ul><li>Expressive: Promotes a culture of atomism and narcissism </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Self-absorption, lack of enduring commitments, disposable relationships </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Standardized: Creates the conditions that foster this culture </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Abdication of role of institutions in cultivating shared values </li></ul></ul>
  9. 13. Necessity of Dialog <ul><li>Without horizons of significance, how do we know which individual differences make a difference? </li></ul><ul><li>Language is always dialogic (Bahktin) </li></ul><ul><li>Autonomy dependent on recognition (Benjamin) </li></ul><ul><li>The authentic self must be defined in dialog with horizons of significance </li></ul><ul><li>Manner vs. content </li></ul>
  10. 15. Integrity <ul><li>Consistency and coherence over time (lifelong) </li></ul><ul><li>Consistency and coherence across roles (lifewide) </li></ul><ul><li>Achieved and asserted through narrative </li></ul>
  11. 16. Psychological Need for Integrity <ul><li>Desire for narrative of the long term in a globalized economy (Richard Sennett) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Own kind of integrity” in the face of discontinuity (Mary Catherine Bateson) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Finding a thread in my life” (Samantha Slade) </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing my “whole human being” (Tracy Wright) </li></ul>
  12. 17. Three curricula Kathleen Yancey, Reflection in the Writing Classroom
  13. 18. Good Work has Integrity
  14. 19. From Dialog to Deliberation <ul><li>A portfolio is a message in a rhetorical situation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Audience as well as author </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Not just expression of but also expression to </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Portfolio as a means for participation in collective decision making </li></ul><ul><li>Deliberative democracy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Decision making </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Legitimation </li></ul></ul>
  15. 20. Principles of Deliberation <ul><li>Publicity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Deliberative system which informs and holds accountable </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Inclusiveness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>All impacted by decisions can participate </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Reasonableness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Economy of moral objections </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Respect for reasonable disagreement </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Provisionality </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Openess to changing positions and decisions </li></ul></ul>
  16. 21. University as Ethical Learning Organization <ul><li>Authenticity: Help students discover and document what’s important to them about learning, based on evidence </li></ul><ul><li>Dialog: Put those individual articulations in conversation with organizational understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Deliberation: Student inputs must have real influence on decision making </li></ul>
  17. 22. A New Role for Competencies <ul><li>Standardized: Matching performance to a pre-defined set of outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>Deliberative: Capture standards all stakeholders value as enacted in practice and examining alignment of both student and programmatic performance </li></ul>
  18. 23. Competencies in Organizational Learning <ul><li>Standardized: Articulating expectations to students </li></ul><ul><li>Deliberative: Means for mutually accountable connection between individual and organizational learning </li></ul><ul><li>Boundary objects: “Boundary objects are objects that are both plastic enough to adapt to local needs and constraints of the several parties employing them, yet robust enough to maintain a common identity across sites” (Leigh Star 1989) </li></ul>
  19. 24. Deliberative Assessment <ul><li>Standardized: Objectivist/utilitarian </li></ul><ul><li>Expressive: Subjectivist/intuitionist (Gray 2002) </li></ul><ul><li>Deliberative assessment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning complex and situated </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Judgment based in embodied expertise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students as authoritative informants about their own learning (Yancey 1998) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Institutional values and outcomes the result of deliberation based these sources of expertise </li></ul></ul>
  20. 25. New Century College Competencies <ul><li>Communication </li></ul><ul><li>Critical Thinking </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic Problem Solving </li></ul><ul><li>Valuing </li></ul><ul><li>Group Interaction </li></ul><ul><li>Global Understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Effective Citizenship </li></ul><ul><li>Aesthetic Awareness </li></ul><ul><li>Information Technology </li></ul>
  21. 26. NCC Graduation Portfolio <ul><li>No predefined standard for what constitutes satisfactory performance in each competency </li></ul><ul><li>Students exposed to (and assessed with) many models and standards through coursework and experiential learning </li></ul><ul><li>Students redefine each competency, beginning with “official definition” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Synthesizing multiple perspectives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Integrating evidence from own experience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Taking ownership and planning for the future </li></ul></ul>
  22. 27. ePortfolio outcomes <ul><li>Demonstrate learning power or learning competencies (Broadstreet 2006) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Key affordance of the portfolio genre (Meeus, Petegem, and Looy 2006) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Input to a community conversation about what it means to be an educated person in the 21st Century </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Competencies are means of connection </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Analysis of student competency essays and evidence a central feature of program review </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conversation involves students, faculty/staff, alumni, and community partners </li></ul></ul>
  23. 32. <ul><li>How does the portfolio help students represent their identity as “whole human beings”? </li></ul><ul><li>How does it invite connections with learning beyond the context of the course, discipline or institution? </li></ul><ul><li>Consistency of values and articulation of relationship between </li></ul><ul><li>Different spheres of life </li></ul><ul><li>Different social roles </li></ul>Integrity <ul><li>How can the way portfolios are evaluated be defined by and involve everyone affected? </li></ul><ul><li>How do we ensure that the information about learning that informs such decisions is broad enough to take advantage of individual differences? </li></ul><ul><li>Decisions made through discussion that </li></ul><ul><li>Is reasonable </li></ul><ul><li>Is inclusive </li></ul><ul><li>Takes into account information from all </li></ul><ul><li>Allows for both consensus and dissent </li></ul>Deliberation <ul><li>How does the portfolio model help students articulate their self-understanding? </li></ul><ul><li>Ownership Validation through reflexivity </li></ul><ul><li>Creativity Articulation the inchoate self through reflection </li></ul>Authenticity
  24. 33. Ideas? <ul><ul><li>Darren Cambridge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>George Mason University </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] . edu </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>+1-202-270-5224 </li></ul></ul>

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