Introduction to the CS10K Community for Teachers

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An introduction to the CS10K Community (developed by the American Institutes for Research Networked Learning Group) for teachers participating in NSF funded professional development projects focused on Computer Science Principles and Exploring Computer Science

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  • Overall demo Demo hackpad on dev server
  • Introduction to the CS10K Community for Teachers

    1. 1. CS10K Community Activating Your Membership
    2. 2. Why an online community for CS10K? • Sustained engagement to support your teaching • Recognize successes and honor challenges • Contribute to a national movement – To broader participation in computing – To better prepare students for the challenges of the future
    3. 3. Online Community Research
    4. 4. What Creates Value for Educators Initial value • Effective leadership and moderation • Appropriate resources • Robust tools for finding what you need and getting questions answered Deeper value • Effective leadership and moderation • Structured activities • Tangible products • Leadership opportunities
    5. 5. Community Activities • Accessing and sharing expertise – Peers nationwide – Outside experts • Finding, sharing, and co-creating resources – Finished and in progress – Within and across projects • Confronting challenges of practice together – Key instructional moments – CSP Portfolio tasks – Recruiting students and communicating with administrators
    6. 6. Confronting the challenges of practice & co-creating resources  Groups – Project groups – Inquiry and working groups – Public groups (e.g., CS in the Wild)
    7. 7. Accessing expertise  Events and one-to-one connections – Webinars – Chats – Time-bounded asynchronous discussions – Member profiles
    8. 8. Finding and sharing resources  Search and annotation – Anyone can upload and tag in relationship to curriculum and development status – Faceted search – Rating and comments
    9. 9. Going public, but only when you’re ready • You control with which groups you have a discussion • You control who gets to see resources you post • You decide with whom and how you want to connect and in what you participate
    10. 10. Tour
    11. 11. Collective wondering How might you use the community to support your learning and performance? What could you contribute (now or later)?
    12. 12. Collective wondering What might prevent you from participating actively? What kinds of support would be helpful in overcoming those barriers?
    13. 13. Collective wondering What topics would you like to see groups and resource development focus on? On which would events with guest experts be helpful?
    14. 14. Questions?
    15. 15. Stay in touch Darren Cambridge dcambridge@air.org @dcambrid (202) 270-5224

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