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Work Hard, Play Harder.  Labour, Playbour and the  Ideology of Play Julian Kücklich, MD.H Berlin
Modding as Playbour
Modding as Playbour <ul><li>Textual poaching? </li></ul><ul><li>Free labour?  </li></ul><ul><li>Crowdsourcing?  </li></ul>...
What is Playbour? <ul><li>Playbour is not work but it is also  not  not work </li></ul><ul><li>Like play, playbour is usua...
 
The Ideology of Play <ul><li>In settings such as massively multiplayer games, playbour is often masked by an ideology of p...
The Ideology of Play <ul><li>In a similar way, the affective labour of members of social networking sites (Facebook, Flick...
 
Playbour and Exploitation <ul><li>This allows us to see that exploitation is underwritten not only by processes of objecti...
The Mechanical Turk
The Mechanical Turk <ul><li>The Mechanical Turk is a machine within which a human pretends to be a machine </li></ul><ul><...
The Mechanical Turk <ul><li>It is also evident that the Mechanical Turk is a “deludic” device, which is intended to trick ...
 
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Playbour

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Playbour

  1. 1. Work Hard, Play Harder. Labour, Playbour and the Ideology of Play Julian Kücklich, MD.H Berlin
  2. 2. Modding as Playbour
  3. 3. Modding as Playbour <ul><li>Textual poaching? </li></ul><ul><li>Free labour? </li></ul><ul><li>Crowdsourcing? </li></ul><ul><li>Exploitation? </li></ul><ul><li>Productive play? </li></ul><ul><li>A waste of time? </li></ul><ul><li>Playbour? </li></ul>
  4. 4. What is Playbour? <ul><li>Playbour is not work but it is also not not work </li></ul><ul><li>Like play, playbour is usually voluntary and it is engaged in for its own sake </li></ul><ul><li>However, it is also a productive activity, although its products are usually immaterial (intellectual property, community, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>This makes it hard to reconcile with traditional conceptualizations of work and play </li></ul>
  5. 6. The Ideology of Play <ul><li>In settings such as massively multiplayer games, playbour is often masked by an ideology of play </li></ul><ul><li>While the laborious character of these games is all too obvious, the generation of value is put under erasure </li></ul><ul><li>In these settings, the value of playbour resides mainly in its creation of social ties </li></ul>
  6. 7. The Ideology of Play <ul><li>In a similar way, the affective labour of members of social networking sites (Facebook, Flickr, etc.) is cloaked by an ideology of play </li></ul><ul><li>Additionally, collusion between providers and users blurs the line between paid and unpaid workers </li></ul><ul><li>Alienation is the result of disowning ( entäussern ) of personal information </li></ul>
  7. 9. Playbour and Exploitation <ul><li>This allows us to see that exploitation is underwritten not only by processes of objectification but also of subjectification </li></ul><ul><li>Subjectification and objectification are intertwined and embedded in a form of multitudinous intersubjectivity </li></ul><ul><li>Exploitation is then not simply the reduction of a human being to a commodity but a complex process of alienation and liberation </li></ul>
  8. 10. The Mechanical Turk
  9. 11. The Mechanical Turk <ul><li>The Mechanical Turk is a machine within which a human pretends to be a machine </li></ul><ul><li>It is a metaphor of the plight of immaterial labourers on the internet, who are hidden, yet exposed, and who have to perform with virtuosity </li></ul><ul><li>The Mechanical Turk can represent both the playbourers of digital games production and the virtuosos of social networking </li></ul>
  10. 12. The Mechanical Turk <ul><li>It is also evident that the Mechanical Turk is a “deludic” device, which is intended to trick players into thinking they are playing against a machine </li></ul><ul><li>This draws attention to the possibilities of deludic strategies of resistance and refusal, such as disinformation or “grief play” </li></ul>

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