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Making the Most of Your Machinery

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Making the Most of Your Machinery

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Making the Most of Your Machinery

  1. 1. Deciding machinery requirements Market share/volume that can be sold determines Required throughput or capacity. Market share divided by (Machinery + labour + other overhead expenses) =Cost per unit
  2. 2. Breakdown of machinery expense philosophies approach 1; amortized with maintenance over a set period -Consulting or mentorship expenses -Initial Purchase or lease - an accountant will help decide, typically based on cash-flow -Repairs or upgrades needed to put machinery into service -Maintenance plan & related costs -Reserve fund/line of credit for emergency replacement -Resale value at the end of the maintenance plan/warranty (minus advertising and commission)
  3. 3. Breakdown of machinery expense philosophies approach 2; educated guess of machinery expense Initial Purchase Repairs or upgrades needed to put machinery into service Minimal maintenance Reserve fund/line of credit for emergency replacement or repairs Resale or scrap value
  4. 4. Breakdown of machinery expense philosophies approach 3; operate moment to moment Being happy come what may
  5. 5. Strategies to get maximum value from machinery Dealers with full service support -Imported machinery has risks with service or parts support unless it's supported by a reputable dealer Find helpful salespeople -A good salesperson will give you time with their service technician to allay concerns -Your salesperson will override service or warranty decisions since they have more margin Regionally made machinery cheaper better support designed for the geographic region more custom options for colour, size, style
  6. 6. Signs of positive project leadership and mentorship Feeling understood and respected when we make a request Feeling clear when a project is declined; -it would be unsafe, unethical, immoral -better options are available, or there are major design flaws -not fitting with the vision, quality and reputation Ability to ask tough questions such as; -'how long do you plan to keep this?', (maybe replacement is a better investment) -'what other options have you looked at?' -'how badly do you want to take on this project?' -'what's in it for you?'
  7. 7. Strategies to make empowered decisions 1)Utilize industry trade associations and conferences -ask what discounts are available, or ways others are meeting their bottom line -make connections with those established in the industry to get advice -get a feel of who people are before paying for consulting or mentorship 2)Consider amortizing large capital purchases to create more cash-flow
  8. 8. 3)Learn how to look past a fresh paint job, or new tires when purchasing -talk with whoever will be servicing your machinery for their advice -decide on indicators of wear, neglect, abuse, modification, especially on demo units -ask others who own the same or similar equipment, check on internet forums -make a check-sheet for your purchase, rank what is most important, follow this list! -budget on the high side so you're not stuck looking for a deal -always test used equipment, or negotiate a test period, go through the manual, test all the functions
  9. 9. 4)Join or start a machinery co-op, or machinery pool 5)Purchasing the same equipment as your neighbors -share spare parts -gain purchasing power, -ability to swap out parts-especially if labour intensive to troubleshoot like electronics
  10. 10. -Can you troubleshoot this? -How do you know?
  11. 11. Be really careful with who touches electronics, or anything else that is a one-shot deal. For example, tractor manufacturers like AGCO are using electronic solenoids that use variable voltage sent from the computer. They cannot be tested without the proper diagnostic equipment, if they receive the wrong voltage the solenoids will need replacement. If you're keeping old tractors with electronics, have a contingency plan in place. Service can require having them trucked to a dealer for diagnostics, or extensive downtime if wiring harnesses need to be made. Wiring malfunction is a major cause of machinery fires, don't make modifications, add lights or accessories without knowing the design of the system being hooked into.
  12. 12. With rare equipment that you feel dependent on, consider the replacement cost of major hydraulic components, injection pumps, engine rebuilds, and have a contingency plan. If you rely on your mechanic for emergency service, ask what it will take to get that emergency service, or get to the top of the queue. If it's not possible, look at where that downtime would leave you, and have a plan around it. Avoid used equipment made with the first year of new technology unless you know it's now proven.
  13. 13. Commissioning or building custom machinery Determine throughput, then; determine how expansion or increases in capacity will be accounted for; -adding into a line to reduce bottlenecks -adding a second processing line or a new facility -selling old machinery to purchase more suitable machinery
  14. 14. Food or Processing Line Considerations -Proper design to eliminate entry of contamination -Elimination of crevices and surfaces that require cleaning -Human-Machine-Interface -Design for easy wash-down, so that processes are sure to be followed -Adjustability to eliminate repetitive stress from injuries Stainless steel is typically expensive and slow to work with, making labour a greater expense. Partnering with a manufacturer who likes and invests in your product is the only way I know of to get the best results. Insist on seeing examples of past work in person, and have similar work to compare it to.
  15. 15. Strategies to get the most value from machinery Dealers with full service support -Imported machinery has risks, limited track record, service or parts support Find helpful salespeople -A good dealer will give you time with their service technician to allay concerns -A salesperson will override service or warranty decisions since they have more margin Regionally made equipment cheaper better support designed for the geographic region more custom options for colour, size, style
  16. 16. Signs of positive project leadership and mentorship Feeling understood and respected when a request is made Feeling clear when a project is declined; -it would be unsafe, unethical, immoral -better options are available, or there are major design flaws -not fitting with the vision, quality and reputation Ability to ask tough questions such as; -'how long do you plan to keep this?', maybe replacement is a better investment -'what other options have you looked at?' -'how badly do you want to take on this project, what's in it for you?'
  17. 17. Organizational design attributes Succession planning for the ownership and management Record keeping system for designs, parts and materials Budget for innovation Capacity list for machines and services -empower you to an educated decision -demonstrated time advantages -quality advantages
  18. 18. Machining Capacity Engine Lathe -20”(30”gap) swing, 84” between centers, -2” spindle bore, #5MT tail-stock Hydraulic Tracer -Duplication and contouring of turned parts ​Threading Machine/Pipe Threader -¼ to 1” bolt making, ¼ to 2” pipe threading ​Radial Arm Drill -4' Arm, #5MT Spindle Magnetic Base Drill -#3MT Spindle Magnetic Base Rotabroach -1 3/8 cutter capacity, 450 RPM Universal Milling Machine -9”x42”table – 28”X, 12”Y, 16Z Horizontal Milling Machine -10”x46”table – 38”X, 12”Y, 20”Z Horizontal Bandsaw -13”x18”, 13”x13” mitre, semi-automatic ​Hydraulic Ironworker Click Here for Video -Punch Maximum 13/16" Thru 3/4" thick material or 50 Tons -Bending Maximum 50 Tons -Bar Shear 1-1/2" Round or 1" Square -Plate Shear 1" x 4" w / Fixed Hold- down, 3/4" x 10", or 5/8" x 15" -Angle Shear 5" x 5" x 3/8" or 4" x 4” x 1/2" -Coper-Notcher 2-3/4" x 4" x 1/4" ​Universal Metal Bender -Pipe to 1.5”, tubing to 2” OD, extensive tooling
  19. 19. Design philosophy -common off the shelf materials including re- purposed components Partnering options -taking a payment based on performance of what is produced -having a continual stake in the success of active clients *Like me, you may have worked many places that would sell anything, even if it wasn't going to work. What would make you want to work with people that won't partnering with you to ensure they have a stake in your success?
  20. 20. Worker attributes; -genuinely interested -fulfilled by their work -wages based on commitment and performance -if they don't know the answer to a relevant question, they offer to follow up
  21. 21. Workers with a tangible stake in the success of the organization ensuring quality & innovation. Training plan for workers, and greater rewards as experience is gained Channels for outside information to reach all workers; trade shows, industry associations Healthy competition in the organization or industry, ensuring innovation, due diligence, Dealer/service network is put in place when going beyond a regional setting
  22. 22. What you can do on-farm Parts inventory system -find out how long to obtain wearing parts, consumables -track what is used, stock materials accordingly Preventative maintenance programs -keep consumables on hand so maintenance can be done on rainy days Have conversations with others who geek out about machines -genuine enthusiasm is infectious Building mentoring relationships -learn how to use your specialty as a
  23. 23. Pre-start Health and Safety Review Comparison There are many laws regulating both machinery safety and food safety. Looking to provinces with stricter regulation is a great way to inform what keeps us healthy. We will have more resilience when factoring safety into long-term investments. When we plan effectively, we can refine production methods on our own terms!
  24. 24. In New Brunswick, under the Occupational Health and Safety Act 235(1) An employer shall ensure that a machine is erected, installed, assembled, started, operated, used, handled, stored, stopped, serviced, tested, cleaned, adjusted, maintained, repaired and dismantled in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications. In Ontario, A Pre-start Health and Safety Review is required when new or used equipment or process is moved to a new workplace. Exemptions are possible under certain specific conditions. sections 66(1) and 66(2) of the Occupational Health and Safety Act (Ontario) state that, if convicted under the Act, an individual can be fined up to $25,000 and/or imprisoned for up to 12 months. The maximum fine for a corporation is $500,000.
  25. 25. Most importantly, are you, your partners and suppliers working to create the safest environment for the people you care about who are working around machinery, while proactively anticipating future regulations? Thank-you! Daniel Haartman www.communitymachinery.com Sackville, New Brunswick 506 899 4880

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