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B3 record keeping

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On-farm Record Keeping

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B3 record keeping

  1. 1. On-Farm Record Keeping If it’s not measures it’s not managed ACORN 2016 Ironwood Organics
  2. 2. Historical Look Back • Starts with sharing memories and methods • History is based on it, it is our ‘knowledge base’ • All living things carry a ‘memory’ of the past • Human records represent collective learning: – first in oral tradition, then mnemonics, then art, epic poems, written texts, and wiki’s
  3. 3. Why Keep Records • Compliance • Financial • Cost of production • Traceability • Too much to remember • Long time frames • Knowledge capital of the farm • Form the basis for analysis and management
  4. 4. A management question • Ultimately it is about management • If it’s not measured, it’s not managed • The success of management is tied to success of measurement • But if your not going to manage, why measure – just another overhead • Move towards organizational maturity • If it didn’t happen twice, it didn’t really happen Assess Change / Modify Measure
  5. 5. Types of Records • Assets / Inventory • Activities • Financial • Spatial / Maps • Certification /Accreditation / Memberships • Observations • Contacts • Breeding (plant / animal) …….
  6. 6. Record Keeping: All-in • If you’re going to choose to record something, make it complete and accurate. • Better to have less data that is relevant, accurate and complete than more data that is inaccurate and incomplete. • Bad data results in bad decisions
  7. 7. What is appropriate data • Mandatory recording keeps you in compliance • Optional record keeping is based on your questions • Incomplete or inaccurate records can be very costly • Work backwards from your questions – What are my questions? – What do I need to answer that question over what time period? – Where can I get that data from? – What do I need to record?
  8. 8. Possible questions • Which crops take the most man hours, tractor hours? • What equipment isn’t being used to its potential? • What is costing me too much to maintain? • Is preventative maintenance paying off? • Which implement is being used the most – replace for a ‘better one’? • What is the crop history for a certain field? • What is the grow history for a certain crop? • What is the max/min/mean rainfall for the last 5 years? • Which crops were most profitable from a labour perspective? • Which crop varieties performed best in a drought year?
  9. 9. Moving from Lists to Insights • Basic level is a series of lists or inventories – List of equipment – List of fields – List of crops for the year – List of field activities • Linking lists provide a ‘view’ from a different perspective • Stand on the ‘entity’ and look at the ‘attributes’
  10. 10. Entities and Attributes • Ones person’s entity is another person’s attributes. • The same ‘thing’ can mean something different to different people. • How do we model the vast array of ‘things’ on a farm operation, and the relationship between and among those things, over time?
  11. 11. Entity Relationship Diagram • List the entities ( person, place, things) • Lists of attributed that describe each entity • List the relationships between those entities • Each entity has a unique number or key – Serial number – Employee number – Lot number – Field number – Variety Name
  12. 12. Data Model
  13. 13. Data Model with Attributes
  14. 14. How much fuel did it take to grow that crop? 11 22 33 44 55
  15. 15. Mapping • Most events have a space and a time • Spatial data (where) can be characterized as points, lines or polygons • Points have a location ( e.g. well head) • Lines have bearing and distance ( e.g. fence line) • Polygons have perimeters and areas (e.g. field or green house)
  16. 16. 1st record of the farm • 1867 Survey • 1 building • Owner: Mrs Johnson • A river headwater
  17. 17. W4 14.6 E2 7W2 11.5 E1 5 W5 7.5 W1 7.3 E5 6.5 E4 6.5 E3 6.3 W7 4 W6 4 WO 74.5 W3 3.6 E3H 1.8 GF 1 W0 1.1 SBC 4.1 SBE 3.6 SBW 3.7 E4H 0.2 W3O 0 BA 0 0 70 140 210 28035 Meters ³1 centimeter = 50 meters W4 14.6 E2 7W2 11.5 E1 5 W5 7.5 W1 7.3 E5 6.5 E4 6.5 E3 6.3 W7 4 W6 4 WO 74.5 W3 3.6 E3H 1.8 GF 1 W0 1.1 SBC 4.1 SBE 3.6 SBW 3.7 E4H 0.2 W3O 0 BA 0 õôó õôóõôóõôó õôó õôó õôóõôóõôóõôóõôóõôóõôó õôó õôó õôóõôóõôóõôóõôó õôó õôóõôóõôó õôóõôóõôóõôóõôó õôó õôó õôóõôó õôóõôóõôóõôó õôó õôó õôó õôó õôó õôóõôó õôóõôó õôó õôóõôóõôó õôó õôó õôóõôó õôó õôó õôó õôóõôó õôó õôóõôó õôó õôó õôó õôó õôóõôó õôó õôó õôó õôó õôó õôó õôó õôó õôóõôó õôó õôóõôó õôó õôó õôó õôó õôó õôó õôó õôó W301 E208 W703 W704 E211 E210 E209 E207 E206E205 E204 E203 E201 E312 E311 E310 E309 E308 E307 E306 E305E304 E303 E302 E301 E411 E410E409 E408 E407E406 E405 E404 E403 E402E401 E512 E511 E510 E509 E508 E507E506 E505 E504E503 E501 W702 W701 W609 W608 W607 W606 W605 W604 W603 W602W601 W515 W514 W513 W512 W510W509 W508 W507 W506W505 W504 W503W502 W501 W405 W409 W408 W402 W401 W304 W303 W302 W201 W4 14.6 E2 7W2 11.5 E1 5 W5 7.5 W1 7.3 E5 6.5 E4 6.5 E3 6.3 W7 4 W6 4 WO 74.5 W3 3.6 E3H 1.8 GF 1 W0 1.1 SBC 4.1 SBE 3.6 SBW 3.7 E4H 0.2 W3O 0 Other Spatial artifacts that give context; •Watersheds •Soil maps •Slope •Zoning •Elevation •Hydrology •Buildings •Fences •Well heads Imagery Field Map Drain Tile Apple Trees
  18. 18. Work Flow • Initial design and data population – Do your compliance lists – Ask your questions – Build your reference data sets – Set your primary keys • On-going data population – Field capture - real time – Clean up and record in permanent log book - weekly – Data entry to digital file – at least 1 pre quarter
  19. 19. Example of List Reporting
  20. 20. Field Activity
  21. 21. Litres of Fuel by Tractor by Year Summary of Man Hours and Tractor Hours
  22. 22. Details of all ‘grow periods’ in 2015
  23. 23. Summary of Activities in W7 Since Inception
  24. 24. Detail and Summary Maintenance Logs
  25. 25. Back to the beginning • Store only the data you have to or data that will answer your questions. • If you store it, make it complete and accurate. • Do your analysis for prior year(s) – What was profitable? – More maintenance? – Sell / acquire equipment? – Crop / climate performance? – Grow less and do more value add? – Increase crop diversity?
  26. 26. If it’s not measured its not managed.

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