Silent transformation of everyday well-being:New challenge to value creation in public services <br />Timo Hämäläinen, Ph....
Agenda<br />Public policydiscussionfocuses on instrumentalthemes<br />Ourmaterialistic definition of well-being is outdate...
Instrumentalobjectivesdominatepolicydiscussions<br />Economy<br />(crisis, globalization, com-petitiveness, efficiency, pr...
Key drivers of subjectivewell-being<br />ENVIRONMENT<br /><ul><li>Naturalenvironment
Infrastructure
Technologies
Organizations
Demographics
Culture (values &  	       	 norms, activities)
Institutions (laws             	& regulations)
Politics
Economy
Labormarkets
Media</li></ul>SUBJECTIVE <br />WELL-BEING<br />MENTAL COHERENCE<br /><ul><li>Comprehensibility of life</li></ul>- Managea...
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Transformation of well-being

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Presentation in European Policy Centre 1st July 2010

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Transformation of well-being

  1. 1. Silent transformation of everyday well-being:New challenge to value creation in public services <br />Timo Hämäläinen, Ph.D.<br />EuropeanPolicy Centre, 29th June 2010<br />
  2. 2. Agenda<br />Public policydiscussionfocuses on instrumentalthemes<br />Ourmaterialistic definition of well-being is outdated (”silenttransformation”)<br />”Problem of choice” in everyday life<br />New pressures on mentalhealth and well-being<br />Well-being and valuecreation<br />Call for a sustainablewell-beingsociety<br />02/07/2010<br />
  3. 3. Instrumentalobjectivesdominatepolicydiscussions<br />Economy<br />(crisis, globalization, com-petitiveness, efficiency, productivity, growth)<br />Welfarestate<br />(publicfinances, reorganizingservices, social security, equality)<br />Everydaywell-being??<br />(subjectivewell-being?, happiness?, good life?)<br />Adaptedfrom: Habermas (1987, Vol. 2)<br />Lähde: Habermas (1987, Vol. 2)<br />3<br />
  4. 4. Key drivers of subjectivewell-being<br />ENVIRONMENT<br /><ul><li>Naturalenvironment
  5. 5. Infrastructure
  6. 6. Technologies
  7. 7. Organizations
  8. 8. Demographics
  9. 9. Culture (values & norms, activities)
  10. 10. Institutions (laws & regulations)
  11. 11. Politics
  12. 12. Economy
  13. 13. Labormarkets
  14. 14. Media</li></ul>SUBJECTIVE <br />WELL-BEING<br />MENTAL COHERENCE<br /><ul><li>Comprehensibility of life</li></ul>- Manageability of life<br />EVERYDAY ACTIVITIES AND ROLES<br />- Worker<br /><ul><li>Consumer
  15. 15. Familymember
  16. 16. Relative
  17. 17. Friend
  18. 18. Hobbyist
  19. 19. Citizen</li></ul>MEANINGFULNESS<br /><ul><li>Exceedingself-interest
  20. 20. Servingothers
  21. 21. Higherpurpose</li></ul>MASLOWIAN NEEDS<br /><ul><li>Self-actualization
  22. 22. Self- and social-esteem
  23. 23. Love and belonging
  24. 24. Security
  25. 25. Physiologicalneeds</li></ul> (thirst, hunger,…)<br />RESOURCES AND <br />CAPABILITIES<br /> - Income & wealth<br />- Knowledge & skills<br /> - Physical & mental<br />health<br /> - Social capital<br /> - Information<br />- Time<br />- Politicalpower<br />- Naturalresources<br />
  26. 26. ”Problem of choice” in everyday life<br />Increasing:<br />uncertainty in decisionmakingdue to transformation and complexity<br /><ul><li>resources & capabilities (income, wealth, health, info, knowledge)
  27. 27. satisfaction of basic (material) needs
  28. 28. freedoms (deregulation & normlessness)
  29. 29. personal & resourcemobility
  30. 30. marketsupply & marketingpressure
  31. 31. hurry (timeremainsfixed: 24/7)</li></ul> Growing:<br /><ul><li>problems in decisionmaking
  32. 32. preference for individualchoice (individualism)
  33. 33. selfishness (due tonormlessness)
  34. 34. conformomity to market and peerpressures
  35. 35. short-termism and lack of loyalty in social relationships</li></li></ul><li>Hectic life in affluent society<br />FRIEND<br />FAMILY<br />MEMBER<br />EMPLOYEE<br /><ul><li> Task 1
  36. 36. Task 2
  37. 37. Task 3
  38. 38. etc.</li></ul>+-<br />Different:<br /><ul><li> Purposes
  39. 39. Practices
  40. 40. Contexts
  41. 41. Cognitive frames
  42. 42. Languages
  43. 43. Norms </li></ul>+-<br />CONSUMER<br />RELATIVE<br />+-<br />Synergies and<br />conflicts<br />+-<br />CITIZEN<br />HOBBYIST 1<br />HOBBYIST 2<br />
  44. 44. Crisis and opportunity<br />Source: O’Hara (2008)<br />
  45. 45. ”Problem of choice” and higherneeds<br /><ul><li> Social relationships and social needs
  46. 46. Love and belonging
  47. 47. Social esteem vs. individualism, selfishness, short-termism
  48. 48. Self-actualization (hurry), lack of loyalty
  49. 49. Purpose and meaning in life</li></ul> vs. individualism, selfishness, marketpressures, specialization & complexity<br /><ul><li>Mentalcoherence
  50. 50. Comprehensibility vs. uncertainty, complexity, decision
  51. 51. Manageabilitymakingproblems, short-termism (hurry),</li></ul>competingloyalties<br />02/07/2010<br />
  52. 52. Antonovsky’s sense of coherence (SOC)<br />Increasing <br />uncertainty<br />& complexity<br />Comprehensibility <br />Problem<br />of choice<br />Mental health,<br />subjective<br />well-being<br />(QoL)<br />Manageability <br />Sense of<br />coherence<br />Individualism,<br />normlessness,<br />selfishness,<br />consumerism,<br />materialism &<br />instrumentalism<br />Meaninglessness <br />Source: Aaron Antonovsky<br />Sources: Aaron Antonovsky (1987); Lindström & Erickson (2005)<br />
  53. 53. Sense of coherence, mental health and well-being<br /> “The [empirical] evidence shows that SOC is strongly and negatively related to anxiety, burnout, demoralization, depression and hopelessness, and positively with hardiness, mastery, optimism, self-esteem, good perceived health, quality of life and well-being.” <br />Source: Bengt Lindstrom & Monica Eriksson (2005): “The Salutogenic Perspective and Mental Health”, in Promoting Mental Health, WHO)<br />
  54. 54. Increasing mental problems and sickness pensions<br />Sense of<br />coherence<br />Health Illness<br /> grey area<br />Pressures of<br />working life<br />
  55. 55. Valuestemsfromwell-being<br />Consumptionvalue (economics, psychology)<br />- Fromconsuminggoods and services (incl. nurturing & protection) <br /> - Meetsphysiological(personalgratification, pleasure) and securityneeds (Maslow)<br />Social value (anthropology, psychology) <br /> - Fromcreating a meaningfuldifference in a particularcontextbyacting and participating in a sharedcommunity (e.g. sportsfans, associations, internetcommunities, clans, citizens)<br /> - Meetslove & belonging & self- and social esteemneeds (Maslow)<br />Identityvalue(sociology, psychology, marketing)<br /> - Fromdevelopingone’scapabilities, individualizedconsumption (e.g. brands)<br />- Frompersonallyexperiencing (owning, participating, visiting) uniqueactivities, objects, eventsorplaces (e.g. personalgifts, heirlooms, concerts, championships)  ”experienceeconomy” <br /> - Meetsself-actualization (identitybuilding) needs (Maslow)<br />Ethicalvalue (sociology, psychology)<br /> - Fromgood and properbehavior, servingothers<br /> - Meets the need for a meaningful and purposefullife (Frankl)<br />Mentalvalue (psychology, sociology)<br /> - From ”slow life”, meditation, hiking, gardening (naturalenvironment), ”homing”, etc. thruimprovements in comprehensibility and manageabilityof life (mentalcoherence)  ”Supporteconomy” (personallytailoredservices), householdservices (’outsourcing’)<br /> ”peace of mind” and ”balanced life” (’sense of coherence’, ’cognitiveconsonance’)<br />
  56. 56. Derivingvaluefromwell-being<br />ENVIRONMENT<br /><ul><li>Naturalenvironment
  57. 57. Technologies
  58. 58. Demographics
  59. 59. Culture (values and norms)
  60. 60. Institutions (laws and regulations)
  61. 61. Politics
  62. 62. Economy
  63. 63. Working life
  64. 64. Media</li></ul>MENTAL COHERENCE<br /><ul><li>Comprehensibility of life</li></ul>- Manageability of life<br />Mentalvalue<br />EVERYDAY ACTIVITIES AND ROLES<br />- Worker<br /><ul><li>Consumer
  65. 65. Familymember
  66. 66. Relative
  67. 67. Friend
  68. 68. Hobbyist
  69. 69. Citizen</li></ul>MEANINGFULNESS<br /><ul><li>Exceedingself-interest
  70. 70. Servingothers
  71. 71. Higherpurpose</li></ul>Ethicalvalue<br />MASLOWIAN NEEDS<br /><ul><li>Self-actualization
  72. 72. Self- and social-esteem
  73. 73. Love and belonging
  74. 74. Security
  75. 75. Physiologicalneeds</li></ul> (thirst, hunger,…)<br />RESOURCES AND <br />CAPABILITIES<br /> - Incomelevel<br />- Knowledge & skills<br /> - Physical & mental<br />health<br /> - Social capital<br /> - Information<br />- Time<br />- Politicalpower<br />- Naturalresources<br />Identityvalue<br />Social value<br />Consumption<br />value<br />Currentconsumption<br />goods & services<br />
  76. 76. Whydoweneed a deeperunderstanding of everyday life and well-being? <br />Itwill help people to live morebalanced and betterlives<br />Itwillguidefirms to developproducts and serviceswhichprovidemorevalue to usersimprovedcompetitiveness<br />Itwillimprove the capability of publicsectororganizations to offerserviceswithbettervalue to citizens improvedeffectiveness & productivity<br />Itwillaidpolicymakers in developingbetterpublicgoods and institutionsthatdelivermorepublicvalue<br />An updated and sophisticatedunderstanding of well-beingprovides and overall vision for the development of a new and sustainablesocio-economicmodel.<br />02/07/2010<br />
  77. 77. Europecouldlead in the road to a sustainablewell-beingsociety<br />Environment<br />Everydaywell-being<br />(subjectivewell-being, happiness, good life)<br />Economy<br />(value-added, compe-titiveness, efficiency, productivity, growth)<br />Public sector<br />(publicvalue, efficiency, renewalcapacity, social security, equality)<br />Environment<br />Environment<br />Environment<br />Adaptedfrom: Habermas (1987, Vol. 2)<br />Lähde: Habermas (1987, Vol. 2)<br />15<br />

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