Content Copyright © 2013 Terpism
Non-Interpreting Image Rights Vary Under CC
Interpreting Outside the
Box: Innovative Stra...
Denise
5
21
Laura NIC
&
Companion Website
terpism.com
& Like us on Facebook
About
Reflectio
n
Co-
construction
Innovate to:
Uphold CPC
Foster Change
Fill a Need
CPC 2.0
Professionalis
m
CPC 3.0
CONDUCT
Designin
g
Change
“I am Change”
Brandon Arthur
“Change
Agents”
Doug Bowen-Bailey
Why The
Need for
Change?
“Sign Language Interpreters in
Mainstream Classrooms:
Heartbroken and Gagged”
Gina Oliva (February 21, 2012)
www.streetlev...
“…remarkably little is known about how much
of an interpreted message is actually
understood by deaf students in the
class...
25% Gap
Students are faced with “…the challenge of
successfully managing the triad of information
from the PowerPoint, professor, ...
70%
Give Up
Cognition
&
Communication
A
Cognitive
Experienc
e
Proximity
in sightline, (Frishberg 1990)
near visuals (Stewart et al 2004)
“Interpreters should advocate for being
allowed...
The CPC says don’t be
obtrusive
Blend of Language & Visuals
42% vs 4%
Pulse Check
Consumer’s
View
Draw a line that starts from the left,
goes up and to right forming a hump
and then comes back down and to the
right. This...
Imagine learning
this way…
Or learning this
way…
Worth
1,000
Words
Eclipsed
Language
Modeling
An Art
Course
An Art
Course
What can
we do?
A thought
Experiment on
Solutions
Evaluating Options
How obtrusive?
How high a need?
Is it #doable?
Break
Remember
this?
One Strategy
Laptop /Monitors
An untapped resource
Indexing slideshows
Internet searches
Document projector
Fingerspelling alternative
Tablet
Portability &
Connectivity
Apps:
Boardcam
True Visage
Uses:
Drawing
Doc Projector
Mirror-cam
Laminated Paper
Demo video here
Uses: Pointing
Writing
Drawing
Labeling
Jargon Jotting
Keywords
Statements
Jargon &
Usage
Access to topic jargon / language
Jargon
Jotting
Consecutive
Interpreting
Used When Student is:
Reading
Doing Classwork
Answering a Test Question
Looking Away
Pre & Post
Conferencing
Prepares You & Consumer for Interpreting
Identifies, Repairs, & Prevents Interpreting Gaps
Trigger...
Pre-conferencing is supported by:
2.2 Assess consumer needs and the interpreting
situation before and during the assignmen...
Interpreting Outside The Box:
The Experience Stations
Putting it all
Together
That Four-Letter
Word
Advocating Innovation
Linguistic Access
Streamlined Process
Effective Role
Developing Practice Models for:
Future Research?
Feedback
References
Presentation by: Denise Gagnon Perdue and Laura Wickless at the 2013 RID National Convention, Indianapolis, IN,...
Image Sources:
RID Conference Logo: http://www.rid.org/userfiles/Image/Conference/2013Logo.jpg
Hand w/lights: http://www.f...
Rid2013 interpreting outside the box 3 hour workshop compressed
Rid2013 interpreting outside the box 3 hour workshop compressed
Rid2013 interpreting outside the box 3 hour workshop compressed
Rid2013 interpreting outside the box 3 hour workshop compressed
Rid2013 interpreting outside the box 3 hour workshop compressed
Rid2013 interpreting outside the box 3 hour workshop compressed
Rid2013 interpreting outside the box 3 hour workshop compressed
Rid2013 interpreting outside the box 3 hour workshop compressed
Rid2013 interpreting outside the box 3 hour workshop compressed
Rid2013 interpreting outside the box 3 hour workshop compressed
Rid2013 interpreting outside the box 3 hour workshop compressed
Rid2013 interpreting outside the box 3 hour workshop compressed
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Rid2013 interpreting outside the box 3 hour workshop compressed

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This PowerPoint is for the workshop: Interpreting Outside the Box: Innovative Strategies In Higher Education. Slideshow has detailed notes (open and view the notes). We will also provide web interface with this information in the future. If you attended the 2013 RID Conference Presentation, this is the PowerPoint you are looking for.

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  • Welcome! When you came in this morning you received a piece of paper. Don't fold the paper – it will be used in just a minute for an activity.
  • Celebrating 50 Years and YOU getting up on a Sunday morning… Celebrating Innovations in our field in the last 50 years:Perdue: A few I remember-the interpreter smock, 4 philosophical models of interpreting (you know Helper, Conduit…etc.),Wickless: How about VRS and VRI? And what is an interpreter smock???
  • Who are we and how did we get to this topic?Introduce self
  • introduction
  • A PDF of our PowerPoint as well as extended notes, statistics, pointers, references, discussion forums and resources will be available on our companion website. You can take notes as you wish, but the info will be online. If you would like access sign in and indicate whether you would like to be a free member or to receive information by email. We’ve also created a Facebook page…look for Terpism.
  • Now its your turn to tell us a bit about you. Take a moment to answer some poll questions about yourself!
  • Take a moment to reflect upon you and your role in the Educational Interpreting field. Think about how you entered the field and what shaped your understanding of the rules of educational interpreting. During this presentation you may question or support or not comprehend something we point out. Please feel free to ask any questions as we go along. We want to start off with an activity…Its Sunday morning and this will get you moving…in case you haven’t had enough coffee. When you came in you received a 5x5 piece of paper…now is the time to take it out and use it in this activity. For this activity you will follow a set of instructions on the video. It doesn’t matter if you have the paper with the quote facing you or facing away from you.Next slide has link.
  • Link to silent video demonstration of origami box making. Have participants attempt to co-construct the box. 6 per group. Video is 100% visually accessible with no print, speech or audio—simply demonstration.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FkCWqYOTn6c&t=07sPause when everyone has made their part of the box. Ask participants to move together to a group of 6. Watch the remaining part of the video to construct a box.Results of co-construction…A few probably had some experience with origami or just had a knack for it and constructed a box that looks like the one demonstrated in the video.A partially constructed box is one that is: Hastily constructed with limited information/experience and with challenges coordinating multiple players and perspectives.If you had more time to view the process, reflect, consider strategies for team coordination, and had time to pause and perfect your techniques, your end product would have come out better. And this leads us into our point about…
  • The Educational Interpreter’s Box. The activity you just completed was s a quick journey through co-construction- albeit this was under pressure. This was meant to mimic (roughly) the way stakeholders responded to or addressed PL 94-142 law establishing mainstream education in the early 1970’s. Interpreter norms and standard practice grew out of this with little time for research. The entire field was still new. Many approaches that grew out of rapid co-construction include SEE I, SEE II, LOVE, and the Rochester Method. Like any tool, English influenced signed systems have uses depending on consumer preference. The results of those early efforts still affect our choices today and impact Educational Interpreting. So the Educational Interpreting Box was created with all these inputs…but we know so much more about learning strategies, interpreting processes, Interpreter research, differences between languages (ASL and English) than we could have in the past…So here we go “innovating”. Wait… What do we mean by Innovation/Innovatin?. We are not implying that we are inventing or developing something new as the word is defined. What we are proposing is thinking about what we do as interpreters in educational settings in a new way.
  • Points:CPC tenets invite innovation—yes, they actually do!We are in transition as a fieldWe strive to be effective but don’t always feel equipped to respond to needsWe know you are here to learn about innovation but before we do that we need to talk about why innovation is appropriate and needed to make sure that everyone is comfortable with the topic. This will also give you a framework to discuss appropriateness of innovations with colleagues in your own work.
  • Lets start by looking at our Code of Professional Conduct to support why we are here today.Tenet 2 - Professionalism: “Interpreters possess the professional skills and knowledge required for the specific interpreting situation”. In this case we are talking about Educational Interpreting.Guiding Principle: Interpreters are expected to stay abreast of evolving language use and trends in the profession of interpreting as well as in the American Deaf community.Points for us to consider:What trends, research, and changes have occurred in education that impact Interpreters/interpreting? Similarly, what trends, research and changes have occurred in Interpreting that impact interpreters working in Educational settings?We will try to answer some of these points in the next hour or so…but let’s look at another tenet of the CPC…
  • Tenet: “Interpreters conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the specific Interpreting situation.”3.1 Consult with appropriate persons regarding the interpreting situation to determine issues such as placement and adaptations necessary to interpret effectively.Again adaptations imply need for appropriate problem solving, i.e., innovation. The focus is on appropriate (fitting) conduct and appropriate consultation with appropriate persons to DETERMINE PLACEMENT AND ADAPTATIONS. It does not say who is adapting, leaving open the possibility for the interpreter to adapt.
  • Interpreters in education are not alone in discussing of innovation. RID Summer 2013 Views invites us into a discussion on institutional redesign. This message is enthusiastic, welcoming, and inclusive. What other aspects of our work need redesign or innovation? 50 years is a good marker to look back and look forward.
  • Change is also widely being discussed on the hugely popular community blog site, StreetLeverage.com. Interpreters are enthusiastically calling for and embracing change in many areas including educational interpreting: http://www.streetleverage.com/2013/05/sign-language-interpreters-embody-the-change-you-want-to-see/ and http://www.streetleverage.com/?s=bowen-bailey
  • Even thoughGina Olivia’s article focuses on k-12 population we felt a haunting similarity that something is seriously missing in how we view educational interpreting even at the post-secondary level. In her article and in our conversations with colleagues, Interpreters report knowing of the gaps but feeling powerless. For example, college classrooms today are rooms of 500 students or more where students interface with their teacher via “clickers”; are classes conducted in a hybrid fashion (part in person and part online); are conducted in computer labs; use a multitude of multimedia technology as visual aids – some of which we are demonstrating through out our presentation today, where the access to English and the visual aid are used in various degrees. All of these factors impact our work and impact the deaf student’s learning.http://www.streetleverage.com/2012/02/sign-language-interpreters-in-mainstream-classrooms-heartbroken-and-gagged/
  • Despite the increased research “concerning sign language interpreting, remarkably little is known about how much of an interpreted message is actually understood by deaf students in the classroom” (Marschark, et al 2005). Statement justifying the need for Marschark’s research on reception of message. A shocking realization.
  • In a 2004 study by Marschark et al, Deaf students are understanding only 60 – 75 % of interpreted lectures when tested while hearing students attending the same lecturescored 85-90% . Marschark et al
  • Educational environment has changed. And deaf students even report that as academic setting rely more and more on technology they are challenged to manage the technology with the lecture, and with an interpreter at the same time.
  • 70% of Deaf and Hard of hearing students do not make it to graduation.SOURCE: Swanwick & Marschark (2010)Compare this to 40% of hearing. (Chronicle of Higher Education 2012)Approximately20,000-24,000 Deaf and Hard of Hearing students in mainstreamcolleges in the 1990s(Schroedel, Watson,Ashmore 2003) The data lists a whole host of reasons why students may give up. Let’s look at some things in the interpreting process that could have contributed to why students said they felt so disconnected from post-secondary settings.
  • In the last 20 years we’ve seen great innovation on the interpreting process: Colonomos, Gish, and Cokley models and Dean and Pollard’s D-C schema, to guide what it is that we do and how we make decisions about what we do.We know a lot about how deaf students learn – cognition. And indeed we know a lot about how people communicate. There has also been research on linguistics. And as interpreters we understand that there is specific content jargon for the settings in which we work.In addition, the classroom is now full of visual stimuli, multi-media techno presentations and interactive digital tools creating cognitive demands because these things have become disembodied from the message. They occur away from the interpreter.
  • Education is not just about access to communication. It is about access to appropriate cognition… it’s about HOW students are prompted to THINK and COMMUNICATE about a topic. In essence, educational interpreting is about access to a cognitive experience through a message that includes words, but that also requires so much more than words alone.
  • A message delivered in a post-secondary setting might include: jargon/content language, dynamic (live spoken/signed) language, frozen text, visual aids and references to them through words or gestures made by the instructor.The challenge for educational interpreters is to take all of this…and ensure that the deaf student gets a roughly equivalent message… we just talked about the 25% gap and the 70% dropout rate… that interpreters have said something is not right… it may have to do with coordinating these factors.
  • We know what’s wrong, we know about the need, let’s look at what happens in a college class. Or at least look at a few of the many things that go on in a class because we only have 3 hours.First of all there are space issues.
  • interpreters have been calling for standing closer to the speaker and visual aids. Every situation or class in our case must be assessed to determine if this is even feasible. At our institution, we have a faculty or two who have had more than one deaf student take their courses. They have gotten quite comfortable with interpreters in the room, requests for pre-post conferencing, discussions on the issues of jargon and visual referencing. They have been very flexible letting the interpreter stand right up at their drawing on the whiteboard. Later we will show a video and you might notice the instructor never even glances at the interpreter who is very close.This is sometimes possible, yet…
  • Sometimes its challenging at best…and feels impossible often. This lecture hall set-up has a multitude of environmental demands. It seats 200 students. Has 4 white boards that slide up and down as needed and the LCD projector screen is located 30 feet above the teachers podium. It’s also a “clicker” classroom.Explain Clicker Class.We’ll look at possible solutions for this in just a moment. But you might think a circus rope would come in handy here for the interpreter to dangle from.We just talked about providing access in the most natural manner (Minor 2011)…
  • Is this the most natural manner? This former dance theatre has been converted to a lecture hall. The LCD screen is at the back of the dance floor about 25-30 feet from the bottom row of seats. This teacher uses a document projector to show math problems since there is no white board for the class.…lead in to “Unobtrusive CPC” getting squished picture.
  • In Tenet 3.5…. “conduct and present themselves in an unobtrusive manner.” But we also have in CPC Tenet2.3 (Professionalism) that we must render the message faithfully. But in 3.4 it says when there are conflicts with fulfilling the CPC, seek alternatives in consultation with appropriate persons. And just when you you think there’s nothing that can be done, soon we’re going to show you a solution.
  • A hearing student can look from the left side or the right side of a visual aid as the teacher is talking about it referencing places or parts of it simultaneously. A hearing student can watch and hear at the same time while the Deaf student cannot. (Our cue a flower) For example…Audience members hold up sign and loudly call out “Here – over here!” “No – There, there! “That’s it!” Play YoutubeLink (click molecule pick)
  • In a study by Rebecca Minor (2011) on how the ASL interpreter handles a hearing speaker’s verbal references (the deixis) the gesture/pointing , the this and that’s—this study shows us that that Deaf instructors handle referencing visuals by point at the visual aid as part of the sentence over 42% of time. Interpreters working with hearing teachers only use this strategy 4% of the time. Remember that both hearing and Deaf instructors use visual aids within sentences (153). She says that these spoken references are inevitable when using visual aids (170). I.e., they are natural. Just as your attention was diverted around the room looking for “this”, “that”, “here” so too is an interpreter when they hear those words…but because of processing time, by the time we turn to look the information is gone and only the other hearing students in the room had access to it.
  • Break
  • While we can never really know what the deaf student experience is…Take out a pen and paper or the back of your program book and do the following activity. Directions will be on the screen
  • Take a moment to read and follow these directions.Point: Using language without visualsOn a side note, many blind students would experience using language this way, but it is not the average experience most people have with language and takes practice. They would also receive extended accommodations such as readers and adjustments to make visual information accessible.
  • Click Youtubelink (the text box is a link) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b2j3kJzlu2k&t=01m27s
  • Or learning this way…Click Youtubelink (ASL only)http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smsJnCjzjFg&t=42sThis was deliberately filmed as a cold interpretation on the first cut—no redos allowed for this to get the most natural feel for what might happen in a live class where the interpreter does not have a visual anchor. Access to the visual information is deliberately omitted. This is not meant as a model or strategy or interpreting skill does not replicate what the student sees. It is meant to shows language without a visual aid.
  • And now we’re going to look at an activity that will show just how truethis statement is.Activity: Describing pictures with languageDivide into pairs. Each group will have a describer and a receiverDescribers face the screenReceivers face away from the screenQuickly arrange yourselvesOnly have 20 seconds to describe the picture.
  • Go!
  • Switch, now round 220 seconds
  • Receivers:Was the picture in your mind very close to the actual image? Did you receive all of the words or letters in a way that you could easily picture/remember?Describers: Would you have preferred to have a picture next to you so you could point to it? How much processing time did it take to recreate the visual AND how would that have affected your ability to also process the instructor’s lecture about the visual? Using a visual eliminates that extra processing and creates a more equivalent message. A picture is worth 1,000 words.
  • So, what we are seeing is part of the message being eclipsed by our choices in the interpreting process. The hearing instructor uses dynamic (spoken) language and static (written) language as well as gesture and visuals to teach concepts. The key here is that the visuals are fully available to hearing students as they listen to the explanation. (The information doesn’t disappear). When an interpreter does not similarly reference a visual aid, the deaf student has only fragmented access to the instructor’s communication which INCLUDES THE PICTURE/PRINT. The student is focused on the interpreter where part of the message is missing, or focused on the visual and missing the explanation, or moving between both hoping to put the puzzle together. Experienced students may eventually become skilled at taking information in peripherally, but this is not the same as having access to a well integrated visual message. So we just told you instructional communication is more than the spoken words or signs. Now we are going to flip that around and tell you that sometimes it is PRECISELY ABOUT THE WORDS.
  • Students are not just acquiring new concepts in college settings, they are also acquiring new vocabulary and language uses. Why is this important? In this instance we are not talking about simply about vocabulary, for example proton or atom. We are talking about jargon and educated discourse that occurs in classroom communication. Instructors use unfamiliar language and discourse in the teaching process and the students start internalizing it. Before long students begin using it themselves during class and eventually find that their English skills expand to reflect their level of education over time. It is English language acquisition through the educational process and is linked to classroom communication and reading. Let’s take a look at an example.
  • Art courses expose students to English statements used in the process of critiquing artwork. The jargon for this is crits C-R-I-T-S These statements include but are not limited to key terms. Hearing students are immersed in this exposure and practice using English to talk about art. They transfer this skill later to writing about art. How are we interpreting that to the Deaf student. You may be able to craft a beautiful interpretation, but the student is receiving it in ASL when the situation would benefit the student more if they also had access to the English. Even for Deaf and hard of hearing students who mentally interpret from sign to spoken or written English, this process is cognitively demanding beyond the demands the hearing students experience.We are going to show you a short clip. Look for what you think would be words or short phrases that might be what we are referring to as jargon. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3bO5_4b_cw
  • In this 12 second clip, what was some of the jargon that you picked up on, that would not be vocabulary words.
  • As we become more aware and add to our body of knowledge we can do something with that data. Lets review the tools we have at our disposal:We have interpreting process models and DC-S, a Code of Professional Conduct, our own and each other’s experiences, consumer input and a plethora of solutions. That we have yet to even envision.The field is relatively new and still developing. We cannot know what we don’t know. With current interpreting norms, we just have not been taught how significant part of the communication all of this is. Now armed with increased awareness, we are responsible to make appropriate adaptations. If this knowledge spreads, as it is spreading now, and we do not adapt, we could be to blame. At 50 years, we are entering a new phase as a profession—a time of reflection and innovation. What is this knowledge? We know there is difference between English and ASL. We know that hearing students are not just having a verbal communicative experience--they are having a cognitive one, and they are receiving more than just spoken words. Remember that hearing students have access to visuals, demonstrations, and instructor’s gestures, testable statements simultaneous to receiving spoken language. Who is the only person that can integrate all of this with the interpreted message? Not the instructor because their job is and has always been to blend interaction with visuals and explanation. We can’t ask teachers to stop using effective methods of communication (picture is worth 1,000 words and language modeling). This would reduce the quality or quantity of instruction. This takes more time meaning fewer concepts are covered or concepts are not covered in depth—not really an option. However, when we know that barriers exist, we as interpreters can change how we approach the message by using high and low tech tools to compensate without reducing the instructor’s effectiveness.Let’s take a moment to recap visually
  • You were just in an art class where jargon was used and/or access to a visual aid was hindered because of processing time. Brainstorm some possible adaptations using communication access as a guideRemember the CPCThink outside the boxObtrusive and Need For SolutionPossible suggestions if needed:Google driveSearch EnginePowerpointLaminated paper/paper and penIpadPen and paperCopies of power pointTextbookCDIDocument projectorHandout (abcdefg)
  • You were just in an art class where jargon was used and/or access to a visual aid was hindered because of processing time. Brainstorm some possible adaptations using communication access as a guideRemember the CPCThink outside the boxHere’s your general guide (a 1-2-3 punch)Balance between level of obtrusivenessand need for a solution
  • Coffee break AND view transcribed video on 30 day challenge. TED Talk “Matt Cutts – Take the 30 day Challenge” subtitled 3 minute video. Now take three minutes to write down possible 30 day challenges for you, work or personal challenges. Give my example: Review of Apps for 30 days…share with them 1 App that applies to InterpretingLaura: Web page a day for 30 dayshttp://www.ted.com/talks/matt_cutts_try_something_new_for_30_days.html
  • Lead in to next slide: What about this?
  • This is what we would normally do. Sit in the sightline of the visual. This can work depending on consumer need, instructor pace, and a variety of other factors. In many cases it is still not as effective as some possible options
  • This is a monitor hooked to the instructor’s document projector. The student is close enough to see the interpreter and the monitor. The interpreter can see the monitor. The visual aid can sometimes “speak for itself”.This solution falls under using laptops and monitors….
  • Another approach in a computer lab. Also consider running an exact copy of the instructors slideshow on a laptop where this provides improved access. As you interpret, you can point to the slideshow because the laptop is turned so the student can see it. You can interact with graphics, point to key phrases and terms, and it is a more natural way of blending language and visual aids. This method means the student will be less likely to miss key info in the slideshow because the interpreter clicks to the next slide and can be slightly behind the speaker. PowerPoint on a laptop is exhibited at one of our 4 experience stations.
  • Tablets have many uses. SomeiPadd apps include Boardcam and True Visage. Boardcam lets you take an image and draw on it. Many apps like these allow you to also project to other devices such as the student’s computer through screen sharing. True Visage is an app that lets you see a true mirror image through the iPhone or iPad camera but without letters or words being backwards. It helps to see what the instructor is doing over your shoulder. It’s also free. You will see True Visage at one of our experience stations.
  • Interpreters can use laminated props in their interpretations (or a paper/electronic copy of a handout/visual aid). Lamination is useful if the prop will be used repeatedly and if it contains a kind of template. In the demonstration linked to Youtube, you see the graph of a normal curve with standard deviations and percentages marked. The PDF is also on terpism.comThis would be an excellent prop for a statistics class since many problems would always be plugged into a normal curve. Lamination makes it possible to use dry erase markers to fill in information (mimicking how the instructor is writing on the board). Writing on a prop during interpretation is a more advanced adaptation and should be practiced before trying it out in the classroom. Again, do this only with consent of consumer.
  • Done in a variety of ways (simultaneous, consecutive, real-time, pre-conference, post-conference) and is easierif team interpreter does the “jotting”. What might this look like?
  • This method, that we are calling jargon jotting, for lack of a better term, is used to expose students to statements, phrases, and key terms that are linked to the subject and that students might be expected to use when discussing or writing about course content. Yes, they may have gotten some of these words from their readings, but students can now be made clearly aware that the words used in the reading are also being used in speech during the class. Simple pen and paper, a document opened on a laptop, a team interpreter monitoring and jotting occasional terms and statements are all ways that student can begin acquiring this new language that the hearing students are acquiring. In the list of words or statements, the student has an opportunity to look up the words now on their own if needed (just as the hearing student would jot some of this new language down if they did not understand it). The interpreter and student can also discuss signing options later as well. Now the student knows the types of statements and terms that are used within the field and can apply them to assignments and / or future profession.Student Testimonial: LINK TO YOUSIF ON YOUTUBE http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j6F1WHPxQ48This is not note-taking and not captioning and does not require a transcriptionist. It targeted exposure to print and related to communication access of the class because at these moments the English is intended to also be the focus of the message. Jargon Jotting can be discussed in post conferencing with the student. We will discuss post-conferencing as another innovation.
  • Interpreters have the option of delaying some of the message when students are doing in-class reading or classwork or looking away. Sometimes students stop focusing on the interpreter because of visual fatigue. The entire class does not have to be simultaneous interpreting, and being inflexible leads to reduced access to the message and class experience. All of these issues (extended reading time, visual focus on work/test question, fatigue) can be accommodated through adaptations. Switching to consecutive interpreting at these moments is one possible solution.
  • An underutilized option is conferencing with the Deaf consumer for improved access. The Pre-Conference:Prepares you and the Deaf consumer for an interpreted experience. It also helps you identify and anticipate potential gaps that may occur BECAUSE OF the interpreting process. Meeting with a student before class gives interpreters a chance to discuss and ask for consent to use innovative strategies. The consumer may also suggest ways to improve access that you had not thought of. Finally, this is an opportunity to gauge level of background knowledge and familiarity with vocabulary. Remember that college opens up new language experiences. The hearing students are learning new concepts and new English terms. The Deaf student is learning new signs, new English, new concepts, adjusting to the instructor’s style, and adjusting to the interpreter’s style. Pre-conferencing reduces some of these distractions.The Post-Conference:Identifies and may attempt to fill gaps that actually occurred because of the interpreting process. If some portion of a lecture was less- or un-interpretable, this would be the time to discuss BOTH the reasons and the concepts/ terms missed. Of course you would also discuss strategies to adapt and prevent the issue from happening next time.Pre-and Post conferencing are DISTINCT from tutoring because they are used to fill and anticipate gaps related to interpreting. This may or may not include consecutive interpreting and extended expansion. Clarify with the student that this is not tutoring because it relates to the interpreting and that interpreters will be provided for tutoring if the student wants the service. Also mention that interpreters will still be provided if the student would like to meet with an instructor or TA for more support. I.e., clarify your role.The process has benefits and pitfalls.The benefits are that you become more in tune with the Deaf consumer’s language and access needs. You also become aware of their level of knowledge of the subject matter which affects your interpreting choices. Eventually, you become better at preventing issues as you see where breakdowns occurred.Pitfalls are that an interpreter may not see this as a strategy that supports independent learning. If so, they may avoid using pre- and post-conferencing, or they may use it as a time to bolster their ego by teaching. Beware of your own ethical lines because you should not be re-teaching or drawing attention to yourself. Draw attention to the interpreting process and content that may have been missed because of it. There is a fine line between reinterpreting, sight interpreting, and teaching. This is especially important when you are not a teacher or subject-matter expert and also not experienced in Deaf ways of knowing. The target is to be concise in any re-interpretation, to focus on the issue of interpretability, to correct errors judiciously, and to quickly identify how to improve the interpreting process going forward.
  • Pre-conferencing is part of the CPC. This tenet does not mention “after”, but a post-conference is a way to pre-conference for future classes as well as an opportunity to “correct errors expeditiously” and provide a form of consecutive interpretation for access to less interpretable portions of a class—again it is all about access and interpretability. (see CPC http://rid.org/UserFiles/File/NAD_RID_ETHICS.pdf and alsoRegistry of Interpreters for the DeafEducationalinterpreter resources toolkithttp://www.rid.org/UserFiles/File/pdfs/About_RID/For_Educational_Interpreters/Educational_Interpreting_Resources_Toolkit/Educational_Interpreting_ToolKit(1).pdf)
  • Now you try. (approx 45 Minutes)There are four stations set up around the room for you to “try it on for size.” Station 1: True Visage, an app for to use to see what’s happening behind you. After you are done there is an iPad mini with a brief survey to complete on your experience with the app and with our overall presentation so far.Station 2: A lecture with Powerpoint projected on the wall and also on a laptop. Sit in the chair and experience the pointing and clicking. Have someone else role play the teacher. We will be there to describe/demonstrateStation 3: Laminated prop role play. Statistics class. There is a script and a prop. You can practice interpreting as your friend reads the script or just play the video of an instructor (script matches captioned video).Station 4: Pre / Post Conferencing station. Get in pairs and role play a pre- or post-conference with a student. Scenario is there.We will rotate so everyone hits all the stations.
  • Before we wrap up, a quick word on “help”. You or others back home may feel concerned that all of this is repackaging the helper model and calling it innovative strategies. We certainly would not want to advocate “harmer” model. Actually, we are encouraging techniques that are helpful to a successful and well-integrated interpretation. These methods help us be more effective and help students access appropriate content, meaning, and communication. Help is not a dirty word!
  • Working with colleaguesWorking with institutionsWorking with consumersWorking with agenciesProfessional developmentSpreading the word through blogs, vlogs, informal discussions
  • Survey for those who attended available here: http://m.loopsurvey.com/9CTfAddTqmJointerpism.com and like us on Facebook. Stay in contact because we need to build a community that is receptive to change!
  • Xperpetualmotion Your Guide To Art School Critiques http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3bO5_4b_cwGirl Positive How to Critique Art:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtthKIB6Y4gAllegory of the cavehttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11j1zayvrDI
  • Rid2013 interpreting outside the box 3 hour workshop compressed

    1. 1. Content Copyright © 2013 Terpism Non-Interpreting Image Rights Vary Under CC Interpreting Outside the Box: Innovative Strategies for Higher Education Denise Gagnon Perdue & Laura Wickless RID 2013 National Conference
    2. 2. Denise
    3. 3. 5 21 Laura NIC &
    4. 4. Companion Website terpism.com & Like us on Facebook
    5. 5. About
    6. 6. Reflectio n
    7. 7. Co- construction
    8. 8. Innovate to: Uphold CPC Foster Change Fill a Need
    9. 9. CPC 2.0 Professionalis m
    10. 10. CPC 3.0 CONDUCT
    11. 11. Designin g Change
    12. 12. “I am Change” Brandon Arthur “Change Agents” Doug Bowen-Bailey
    13. 13. Why The Need for Change?
    14. 14. “Sign Language Interpreters in Mainstream Classrooms: Heartbroken and Gagged” Gina Oliva (February 21, 2012) www.streetleverage.com …”Something is not right”
    15. 15. “…remarkably little is known about how much of an interpreted message is actually understood by deaf students in the classroom” (Marschark, et al 2005)
    16. 16. 25% Gap
    17. 17. Students are faced with “…the challenge of successfully managing the triad of information from the PowerPoint, professor, and interpreter.” (Lartz, Stoner, and Stout 2008)
    18. 18. 70% Give Up
    19. 19. Cognition & Communication
    20. 20. A Cognitive Experienc e
    21. 21. Proximity in sightline, (Frishberg 1990) near visuals (Stewart et al 2004) “Interpreters should advocate for being allowed to stand closer to visual materials and the speaker when possible.” (Minor 2011)
    22. 22. The CPC says don’t be obtrusive
    23. 23. Blend of Language & Visuals
    24. 24. 42% vs 4%
    25. 25. Pulse Check
    26. 26. Consumer’s View
    27. 27. Draw a line that starts from the left, goes up and to right forming a hump and then comes back down and to the right. This line also has 7 vertical lines: one is down the middle, and the six others appear equidistant on either side of the center line. Three lines are to the left, and three are to the right.
    28. 28. Imagine learning this way…
    29. 29. Or learning this way…
    30. 30. Worth 1,000 Words
    31. 31. Eclipsed
    32. 32. Language Modeling
    33. 33. An Art Course
    34. 34. An Art Course
    35. 35. What can we do?
    36. 36. A thought Experiment on Solutions
    37. 37. Evaluating Options How obtrusive? How high a need? Is it #doable?
    38. 38. Break
    39. 39. Remember this?
    40. 40. One Strategy
    41. 41. Laptop /Monitors An untapped resource Indexing slideshows Internet searches Document projector Fingerspelling alternative
    42. 42. Tablet Portability & Connectivity Apps: Boardcam True Visage Uses: Drawing Doc Projector Mirror-cam
    43. 43. Laminated Paper Demo video here Uses: Pointing Writing Drawing Labeling
    44. 44. Jargon Jotting Keywords Statements Jargon & Usage Access to topic jargon / language
    45. 45. Jargon Jotting
    46. 46. Consecutive Interpreting Used When Student is: Reading Doing Classwork Answering a Test Question Looking Away
    47. 47. Pre & Post Conferencing Prepares You & Consumer for Interpreting Identifies, Repairs, & Prevents Interpreting Gaps Triggers Innovative Options Assesses Needs & Background Knowledge With Deaf Consumer
    48. 48. Pre-conferencing is supported by: 2.2 Assess consumer needs and the interpreting situation before and during the assignment and make adjustments as needed. And RID’s Educational Interpreter Toolkit.
    49. 49. Interpreting Outside The Box: The Experience Stations
    50. 50. Putting it all Together
    51. 51. That Four-Letter Word
    52. 52. Advocating Innovation Linguistic Access Streamlined Process Effective Role Developing Practice Models for:
    53. 53. Future Research?
    54. 54. Feedback
    55. 55. References Presentation by: Denise Gagnon Perdue and Laura Wickless at the 2013 RID National Convention, Indianapolis, IN, August 11, 2013 Barefoot, B. O. (2004). Higher education's revolving door: confronting the problem of student drop out in us colleges and universities. Open Learning, 19(1), 9-18. Educational Interpreting Certificate Program (EICP) Work Group, Fact Sheet: CRISIS in educational interpreting services, February 2003. Retrieved from http://frcc.cccoes.edu/~doit/ Kurz, K., & Caldwell Langer, E. (2004). Student perspectives on educational interpreting: Twenty deaf and hard of hearing students offer insights and suggestions. In E. Winston (Ed.), Educational interpreting: How it can succeed,. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press. Lartz, M., Stoner, J., & Stout, L. (2008). Perspectives of assistive technology from deaf students at a hearing university. Assistive Technology Outcomes and Benefits, 5(1), 72-91. Marschark, M., Sapere, P., Convertino, C., & Seewagen, R. (2005). Educational interpreting: Access and outcomes. In M. Marschark, R. Peterson & E. Winston (Eds.), Interpreting and interpreter education: Directions for research and practice. Retrieved from https://ritdml.rit.edu/handle/1850/254 Minor, R. (2011). A comparison of deixis in interpreted lectures and signed lectures in asl: An exploration of the structures of asl utilized by interpreters and deaf teachers when referring to a visual aid. (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. (Accession Order No. AAT3467390) Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf. Vol. 30. VIEWs Editor. Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf. Summer/Spring ed. Alexandria: RID Press, 2013. 2 vols. Print. Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf. Educational interpreter resources toolkit. Retrieved from http://www.rid.org/UserFiles/File/pdfs/About_RID/For_Educational_Interpreters/Educational_Interpreting_Resources_Toolkit/Educational_Interpre ting_ToolKit(1).pdf Schick, B., Williams, K., & Kupermintz, H. (2005). Look who's being left behind: Educational interpreters and access to education for deaf and hard- of-hearing students. Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 11(1), 2-20. Retrieved from http://jdsde.oxfordjournals.org Schroedel, J., Watson, D., & Ashmore, D. (2003). A national research agenda for the postsecondary education of deaf and hard of hearing students. American Annals of the Deaf, 148(2), 67-73. Retrieved from http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/aad/summary/v148/148.2schroedel.html Smith, J. (2004). Deaf students in collegiate mainstream programs. Deaf Studies Today!, 1, 291-307. Retrieved from http://doug.stringham.net/uvuasl/3310/ch10_smith.pdf Swanwick, R., & Marschark, M. (2010). Enhancing education for deaf children: Research into practice and back again. Deafness & Education International, 12(4), 217-235. Retrieved from http://www.thereadingrhizome.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Enhancing-education-for-deaf- children.pdf Winston, E. (1994). An interpreted education: Inclusion or exclusion. In R. Johnson & O. Cohen (Eds.), Implications and Complications for Deaf Students of the Full Inclusion Movement (pp. 2- Winton, E. (2004). Interpretability and accessibility of mainstream classrooms. In E. Winston (Ed.), Educational interpreting: How it can succeed, Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press. 94). Retrieved from http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/detail?accno=ED380917
    56. 56. Image Sources: RID Conference Logo: http://www.rid.org/userfiles/Image/Conference/2013Logo.jpg Hand w/lights: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lel4nd/6168273235/ Woman Arms Reaching Up: http://pixabay.com/en/cute-happy-female-girl-hands-18716 Man on right: https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-itRx4YsxAwI/R3yeITP-cDI/AAAAAAAAFNA/oELQDRHJwYE/s512/iStock_000000862444XLarge.jpg Woman in center: http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3125/3221419489_37405ba350.jpg Woman on left: http://fc04.deviantart.net/fs32/f/2008/234/f/5/f50fb717f9071ec9a27b0cd64466be87.jpg Water drop: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8351/8313939304_3f23c85f8c_z.jpg Gears: http://pixabay.com/static/uploads/photo/2012/11/13/06/38/gears-65838_640.jpg?i Professional Man: http://fc01.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2013/020/a/8/transparent_business_man_psd_by_abdil88-d5s6bfq.jpg Man on Wheel: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8351/8382018764_e5b924c47e.jpg Grid Backdrop: http://fc00.deviantart.net/fs71/i/2010/230/a/a/Blueprint_wallpaper_by_basurero.png StreetLeverage Logo: http://www.streetleverage.com/wp-content/themes/StreetLeverage/images/logo.jpg Water Drop: http://images.cdn.fotopedia.com/flickr-8313939304-hd.jpg Walking in Rain: http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3189/3721394393_8184af459f.jpg Light Bulb: http://fc09.deviantart.net/fs21/i/2007/264/a/3/Dead_light_bulb_by_brain87.jpg Painting the Sky: http://fc05.deviantart.net/fs30/f/2008/093/5/d/you_can_change_the_world_by_anciss.jpg Face inside face: http://pixabay.com/static/uploads/photo/2013/02/24/08/54/face-85640_640.jpg Man teaching in classroom: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/74/US_Navy_090617-N-9610C- 029_Chad_Stober%2C_an_instructor_at_John_C._Stennis_University_%2C_center%2C_teaches_students_Japanese_in_a_training_classroom_aboard_t he_Nimitz-class_aircraft_carrier_USS_John_C._Stennis_%28CVN_74%29.jpg/800px-thumbnail.jpg Students at computer: http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2629/5716554668_3ca7e15b48.jpg Man at screen: http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4076/4951300217_847ccc35de_o.jpg Woman at screen: http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4103/5087246030_7c23b3bb09.jpg Woman signing: http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4084/5086651123_f964b522d0.jpg Atom: http://pixabay.com/static/uploads/photo/2012/04/18/23/07/glass-38197_640.png?i Eclipse: http://www.fotopedia.com/items/flickr-2749601692 Light Bulb: http://fc09.deviantart.net/fs21/i/2007/264/a/3/Dead_light_bulb_by_brain87.jpg Kaleidoscope: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b9/View_of_a_kaleidoscope.JPG/800px-View_of_a_kaleidoscope.JPG Math backdrop: http://fc01.deviantart.net/fs12/i/2006/339/a/e/Fedora_Borealis___Backdrop_by_pookstar.png Molecule: https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRwNpMBhdFy1iK6kaEnW7daHBjIzowbkA_Eqgs7SbhWU1mDED4qFA Circle diagram: http://fc01.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2011/056/6/8/venn_diagram___feelings_by_mrbrightideas-d3aefvp.png 30: http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3306/3217729308_8491fea28f.jpg Window lights on floor: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/13/Such_a_long_history_of_working_together..._%288026007243%29.jpg/800px- Such_a_long_history_of_working_together..._%288026007243%29.jpg https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRZyHte1trowWZpKlQXejYQMCeWk3VyqRKY2JcnJr_hbayPCA9PeA Interpreting images copyright © 2013 Terpism

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