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Bass pod2017 public

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Bass pod2017 public

  1. 1. Educational Design in a Dis-integrative Age - Leading from the Middle - Randy Bass (Georgetown University) Professional and Organizational Development (POD) October 27, 2017
  2. 2. Diana Natalicio, President UTEP “I hope each of you will help me spread the word that there’s another narrative.”
  3. 3. Generate variations on our model through experimentation. Rule #1: Every project we support has to break at least one rule. Strategies for Change Create a context for innovation: top down permission grass roots creativity + R&D mechanism (with authority to clear obstacles)
  4. 4. individuals structures
  5. 5. individuals structures What does it mean to lead from the middle?
  6. 6. “Mission Efficiency” “Positive Purpose” Leading from the middle: what’s the narrative? Value: self-interest Value: impact
  7. 7. “Core Pathways”
  8. 8. Theology: Human place in the Cosmos Philosophy: Climate Change and Global Justice History: The Little Ice Age: Volcanoes and Crisis in the Premodern World Humanities: Genres of the Anthropocene Science: People, Plants and Climate
  9. 9. T TH 11-12:15 All course modules offered in the same time slot.
  10. 10. Week 4: Moral imagination exercise Fall Semester Spring Semester Opening session and science tutorial
  11. 11. Week 4: Moral imagination exercise Week 13: Role playing policy simulation Final interdisciplinary exercise Fall Semester Spring Semester Opening session and science tutorial
  12. 12. “Mission Efficiency” “Positive Purpose” Leading from the middle: what’s the narrative? Value: self-interest Value: impact
  13. 13. Problem-based learning community What is this case a case of? Impact: • Facilitates engagement with a complex problem from multiple disciplinary perspectives. • Embeds typically disconnected “Core” requirements in a sustained learning experience. • Models and scaffolds integration for students. Self-Interest: • Offers an integrative structure that lets disciplinary faculty do their thing. • An innovation that fits structures—requirements and load. • Modular design allows more dept’s to have exposure to Core. • Modularization provides faculty flexibility in their own rhythms.
  14. 14. “Mission Efficiency” “Positive Purpose” Leading from the middle: what’s the narrative? Value: self-interest Value: impact
  15. 15. Georgia State University 2003 32 % Six-year Graduation Rates 2014 54 % 2003 31 % Pell Eligible 2013 58 % Martin Kurzweil and Derek Wu, “Building a Pathway to Student Success at Georgia State University” Ithaka S&R, April 23, 2015  Learning Communities  Peer tutoring  Summer Success Academy  Structurally connected admissions, advising, registrar, financial aid, and institutional research Data Warehouse – Dist. Data
  16. 16. Georgia State University Martin Kurzweil and Derek Wu, “Building a Pathway to Student Success at Georgia State University” Ithaka S&R, April 23, 2015 “Indeed, no single initiative is responsible for the dramatic gains at GSU; the university’s improvement represents the accumulated impact of a dozen or more relatively modest programs. As it turns out, the recipe for GSU’s success is not a particular solution, but rather a particular approach to problem-solving.”
  17. 17. Georgia State University Martin Kurzweil and Derek Wu, “Building a Pathway to Student Success at Georgia State University” Ithaka S&R, April 23, 2015 “The risk of faculty resistance will become more acute over time….” “To this point, most of the academic initiatives…been supplements or supports at the margins of instruction. … Applying the problem-solving approach to general education requirements, course sequences, instructional design, and pedagogy will be more analytically complex and politically difficult.”
  18. 18. “Mission Efficiency” “Positive Purpose” Leading from the middle Educational Design in a Dis-integrative Age Value: self-interest Value: impact
  19. 19. How do we make a robust and meaningful education equitably available to everyone? Randy Bass, Georgetown Bret Eynon, LaGuardia Community College
  20. 20. The great tension of our time in education is between integration and dis-integration .
  21. 21. Two paradigms of education Integrative (bundled): Curricular & co-curricular as part of a whole Knowledge, skills & dispositions Connections & integration Design of learning experiences for whole person development Disintegrative (unbundled): Modular and granular learning experiences Elementary and discrete competency-based learning Learning decoupled from formal boundaries Analytics that track narrow or micro learning
  22. 22. Two paradigms of education Disintegrative (unbundled): Modular and granular learning experiences Elementary and discrete competency-based learning Learning decoupled from formal boundaries Analytics that track narrow or micro learning
  23. 23. Two paradigms of education Integrative (bundled): Curricular & co-curricular as part of a whole Knowledge, skills & dispositions Connections & integration Design of learning experiences for whole person development
  24. 24. Two paradigms of education Integrative (bundled): Curricular & co-curricular as part of a whole Knowledge, skills & dispositions Connections & integration Design of learning experiences for whole person development Disintegrative (unbundled): Modular and granular learning experiences Elementary and discrete competency-based learning Learning decoupled from formal boundaries Analytics that track narrow or micro learning
  25. 25. Rebundling: Toward a New Synthesis Disintegrative (unbundled): Modular and granular experiences. Elementary and discrete competency-based learning Learning decoupled from formal boundaries Analytics that track narrow or micro learning Integrative (bundled): Curricular & co-curricular as part of a whole Knowledge, skills & dispositions Connections & integration Design of learning experiences for whole person development Disintegrative in service to the integrative
  26. 26. Examples of Rebundling Statway at LaGuardia Community CollegeHabitable Worlds at Arizona State
  27. 27. Examples of Rebundling Michael Crow, ASU: 5th Wave Public University
  28. 28. Examples of Rebundling Cafeteria College to Guided Pathway College Micahel Crow, ASU: 5th Wave Public University
  29. 29. Examples of Rebundling Cafeteria College to Guided Pathway College Micahel Crow, ASU: 5th Wave Public University Minerva University
  30. 30. Rebundling: Toward a New Synthesis Disintegrative (unbundled): Modular and granular experiences. Elementary and discrete competency-based learning Learning decoupled from formal boundaries Analytics that track narrow or micro learning Integrative (bundled): Curricular & co-curricular as part of a whole Knowledge, skills & dispositions Connections & integration Design of learning experiences for whole person development Disintegrative in service to the integrative Discussion: What does rebundling look like on your campus?
  31. 31. Integrative Dis-integrative
  32. 32. Dis-integrative Integrative Inclusive Excellence Exclusive Excellence Inclusion, Diversity , Equity (access but experience and outcomes) Qualified and Prepared students Rich holistic environments Liberal arts colleges and universities open access and public institutions Startup, disruptors Minerva University
  33. 33. Purdue-Gallop Poll on Engaged Work and Flourishing Two most important predictors of success: 1) Adult mentor who cared about you 2) Sustained project 13% had both.
  34. 34. Dis-integrative Integrative Inclusive Excellence Exclusive Excellence Inclusion, Diversity , Equity (access but experience and outcomes) Qualified and Prepared students Rich holistic environments Liberal arts colleges and universities open access and public institutions Minerva University “%13 of all graduates”
  35. 35. Integrative Inclusive Z-axis Quality
  36. 36. Integrative Inclusive
  37. 37. “Mission Efficiency” “Positive Purpose” “Moral Urgency” “Educational Malpractice” Leading from the Middle for the First Quadrant Value: self-interest Value: impact Value: integrity Value: shame
  38. 38. “Mission Efficiency” “Positive Purpose” “Moral Urgency” “Educational Malpractice” Four Narratives for the first quadrant Value: self-interest Value: impact Value: integrity Value: shame
  39. 39. The Quality Gap: Medicine’s Secret Killer (Hedrick Smith) Tales of two responses to the quality gap: New England: fear of published data led to collaboration. New York City: no interest in collaboration only public shame worked.
  40. 40. “Once one starts to ask the question, how am I doing? Could I do better? And is anyone doing better at this than I am? That’s pretty closely connected to your own self-image and identity. There’s a form of personal stakes in this when a doctor says ’I bet I could get better if I study what I do and try to learn from others.” “We need an environment that encourages exchange, learning, relationships and a commitment to continuous improvement.” Dr. Don Berwick
  41. 41. “Mission Efficiency” “Positive Purpose” “Moral Urgency” “Educational Malpractice” Four Narratives for the first quadrant Value: self-interest Value: impact Value: integrity Value: shame
  42. 42. “Mission Efficiency” “Positive Purpose” “Moral Urgency” “Educational Malpractice” Four Narratives for the first quadrant Value: self-interest Value: impact Value: integrity Value: shame
  43. 43. Integrative Inclusive
  44. 44. What might it mean to design and research in the integrative and inclusive quadrant?
  45. 45. Launched in 2016, the Regents Science Scholars Program provides support for first-generation college students majoring in biomedical fields. Regents Science Scholars
  46. 46. Summer before the first year: Students enroll in a rigorous residential summer bridge program Summer between first and second year and second and third year: Students take specially designed online modules to reinforce knowledge, while allowing students to work and be home with their families. Regents Science Scholars
  47. 47. In three years, the number of first gen/low income students in biomedical majors has increased 5x. >20% of the matriculating class of Biology majors are Community Scholars. Regents Science Scholars
  48. 48. Glen Manor Feral Wine Project
  49. 49. Professor Heidi Elmendorf, Biology Director, Regents Science Scholars Program “We covered everything we would have covered just in the context of this project.” Summer Bridge course on foundations of biology and chemistry. “They were surprised and daunted that they were the research team. But within one day the most common phrase was, “what would help Jeff?”
  50. 50. Good Morning, I have been thinking about the design of the lab all night. And I think I have an understanding now after reading the material all over again. My suggestion is to create a experiment with like 20 control groups and tests. I would number the different locations that the microbes are found (on grape, leave, soil, etc.) then organize them into hypothetical dishes. This way hypothetically speaking I will create multiple juices using different combinations of the microbes…This would help me keep track of them, and allow me to distinguish one group from another. Does this seem possible? Can this lead me to understanding its flavor profile, giving Jeff the best possible taste? All the best, NW
  51. 51. 1&23&4 5&67&8 9&10 11&12 13&14 15&16 1-4: Purcellville-Tankerville Complex, 15-25% slope 5-8: Tankerville-Purcellville Complex, 15-25% slope 9-10: Myersville Silt Loam, 2-7% slope 11-12: Philomont-Tankerville Complex, 7-15% slope 13-14: Purcellville-Tankerville Complex, 15-25% slope 15-16: Purcellville Loam, 15-25% slope
  52. 52. Identification Procedures Gram Staining Culture Morphology Growth Medium indicators Gel Electrophoresis Polymerase Chain Reaction
  53. 53. Start with respect. What might it mean to design and research in the integrative and inclusive quadrant?
  54. 54. Now we know.
  55. 55. Lee Shulman, “A Different Way to Think about Accountability.” “My point is that excellent teaching, like excellent medical care, is not simply a matter of knowing the latest techniques and technologies. Excellence also entails an ethical and moral commitment--what I might call the "pedagogical imperative." … This is an obligation that devolves on individual faculty members, on programs, on institutions, and even on disciplinary communities. A professional actively takes responsibility; she does not wait to be held accountable.”
  56. 56. Integration and integrity
  57. 57. “Mission Efficiency” “Positive Purpose” “Moral Urgency” “Educational Malpractice” Value: self-interest Value: impact Value: integrity Value: shame Leading from the middle Thank you! bassr@georgetown.edu

Editor's Notes

  • That design question—what would it look like if we were designing higher education at this moment in history—is one of the questions that we ask in a piece we just published with AACU.

    Perhaps the most important version of that design question is how do we make a whole person education equitably available to everyone? To do that we have to shift the conversation from unbundling to rebundling.

    So we’ll explain what we mean by both of these things in the current context. And then we’ll address what we see as eP’s role in the rebundling of higher education.

    So first, what is the context and the conversation that we are hoping to reframe?
  • The tension and complementarity of impact and self-interest has a very particular context for me.
  • How to guide how they combine? Core elements
  • How to guide how they combine? Core elements

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