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Top 10 Things You Must Know About Installing an In-Ground Fence A buried wire in-ground pet fencing system is the perfect ...
Tip 1: Learn how it works.   <ul><li>A radio signal is sent through a buried wire marking the boundaries you wish to set f...
<ul><li>As your dog approaches the boundary, the dog’s collar issues a warning beep. If he continues into the boundary, yo...
Tip 2: Layout your fence on paper.   <ul><li>Sketch your house, driveway, trees and other landscape features. Then design ...
Tip 3: Review the space  you wish to enclose.  <ul><li>Most in-ground fence products come with 500-feet of burial grade wi...
Tip 4: Have your utilities marked.   <ul><li>This is a free single-phone call service in most communities. The utility com...
Tip 5: Cancelling the signal.  <ul><li>In an area such as outside of your doorway, you may wish to cancel the signal to al...
Tip 6: Waterproof splices.  <ul><li>As you need to tie lengths of wire together, strip about ¾-inch of insulation and twis...
Tip 7: Test before you bury.  <ul><li>Spread your wire across your property per your layout. Before you start digging, plu...
<ul><li>Now’s the time to make adjustments in your layout, recheck that splices are tight, and avoid any sharp turns in th...
Tip 8: Dig in!   <ul><li>For small yard installations, you’ll use a sharp garden spade, or a gas-powered lawn edger. You o...
<ul><li>Don’t pull your wire too tightly; it will need to expand and contract with changes in temperature. In this case, l...
Tip 9: Raise the flag.  <ul><li>With your system powered on, and the dog’s collar in hand, walk up to the buried line. At ...
Tip 10: Added functionality.  <ul><li>For your pet to gain even easier access to your yard, consider a pet door.  </li></u...
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10 things you need to know...in-ground fence

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PetSafe's Top 10 things you need to know about installing an in-ground wired pet fence.

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10 things you need to know...in-ground fence

  1. 1. Top 10 Things You Must Know About Installing an In-Ground Fence A buried wire in-ground pet fencing system is the perfect way to keep your dog safe on your property. The cost of the system is a fraction of what you’ll spend on pricey privacy fences. And in some communities, raising a physical fence is considered a visual obstruction and is forbidden by neighborhood covenants. Let’s count down the top 10 must-know tips for installing an in-ground electronic fence to contain your pet.
  2. 2. Tip 1: Learn how it works. <ul><li>A radio signal is sent through a buried wire marking the boundaries you wish to set for your dog. You adjust the field width with a turn of a knob. The boundary can radiate 2 feet from your buried wire to as much as 10 feet. You determine the width based on the size of your yard, and your dog’s temperament. </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>As your dog approaches the boundary, the dog’s collar issues a warning beep. If he continues into the boundary, your pet receives a safe but startling electronic pulse. While harmless, this Correction will persuade him to stay in the Safe Zone you’ve established. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Tip 2: Layout your fence on paper. <ul><li>Sketch your house, driveway, trees and other landscape features. Then design the fencing layout that’s right for you and your pet. You may find that some landscape features throw you a curve you hadn’t anticipated. Better to discover this now when the pencil eraser is handy, rather than later when you are digging in your yard. </li></ul>If you have any questions about your unique yard layout, our PetSafe Customer Care reps are happy to review a fax or e-mail copy of your map and can offer time-saving pointers.
  5. 5. Tip 3: Review the space you wish to enclose. <ul><li>Most in-ground fence products come with 500-feet of burial grade wire, enough to enclose about 1/3rd of an acre. You can get kits of additional in-ground fence wire and training flags. Also, check the amount of acreage that your transmitter will cover. Some systems can send a signal to enclose up to 5 acres; others can enclose up to 10 and 25 acres. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Tip 4: Have your utilities marked. <ul><li>This is a free single-phone call service in most communities. The utility companies will mark the buried lines around your property. When laying containment wire, it’s best to avoid buried power lines. If you must cross over them, lay your line at a 90-degree angle to the line. Should you run parallel to a buried power line, it may create a weak gap in your fence, and a chance for your dog to escape. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Tip 5: Cancelling the signal. <ul><li>In an area such as outside of your doorway, you may wish to cancel the signal to allow your dog to come in and out of the house without a correction pulse. Simply twist the wires together, as you would fasten a bread tie. Be sure there are 10 to 12 twists per foot. The signal will be knocked out for the length of the twisted area. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Tip 6: Waterproof splices. <ul><li>As you need to tie lengths of wire together, strip about ¾-inch of insulation and twist the bare wires together. Then insert your splice into a gel-filled splice cap. The gel quickly waterproofs your connection and ensures a good radio signal. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Tip 7: Test before you bury. <ul><li>Spread your wire across your property per your layout. Before you start digging, plug in all connections and walk your pet’s receiver collar up to the line (your installation instructions will give you details on how the transmitter and collar set up.) </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>Now’s the time to make adjustments in your layout, recheck that splices are tight, and avoid any sharp turns in the wire. Ease your corners over 8 or 10 feet, rather than bending wire at a sharp 90-degree angle. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Tip 8: Dig in! <ul><li>For small yard installations, you’ll use a sharp garden spade, or a gas-powered lawn edger. You only need to slit the sod, going down just 2 to 3 inches. Try to cut at a 45-degree angle. Slip the length of wire in with your fingers, or push with a flat wooden paint stick. Have a friend follow behind you as you go, tamping down the earth by walking the line. </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Don’t pull your wire too tightly; it will need to expand and contract with changes in temperature. In this case, loose is just fine. </li></ul><ul><li>For a bigger project, you can get a lightweight trencher from most equipment rental places. Installing an average in-ground fence system is a good weekend project. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Tip 9: Raise the flag. <ul><li>With your system powered on, and the dog’s collar in hand, walk up to the buried line. At the point where the collar starts to beep, plant one of the training flags. Repeat this every 8 to 10 feet. The flags will serve as an important cue as you train your dog. Installing the in-ground fence is only part of the job; you’ll spend up to 2 weeks training your pet to her new border. In time you’ll remove the temporary training flags and your pet will know her limitations. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Tip 10: Added functionality. <ul><li>For your pet to gain even easier access to your yard, consider a pet door. </li></ul><ul><li>More than one dog? Get an extra receiver collar. In-ground fencing systems will contain an unlimited number of dogs, as long as each is wearing a compatible electronic collar. </li></ul><ul><li>Check collar batteries frequently. Most batteries last a few months depending on how often they are powered on, and how many corrections the collar will deliver. </li></ul>

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