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OpenAIRE webinars during OA week 2017: Humanities and Open Science

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Delivered by Marie Puren (INRIA) and Laurent Romary (DARIAH, INRIA) on October 26 2017

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OpenAIRE webinars during OA week 2017: Humanities and Open Science

  1. 1. Marie Puren (Inria) Laurent Romary (Inria, DARIAH) OPEN ACCESS AS PRACTICE IN THE HUMANITIES 126/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  2. 2. Open Access and the Humanities “The American Historical Association strongly encourages graduate programs and university libraries to adopt a policy that allows the embargoing of completed history PhD dissertations in digital form for as many as six years.” American Historical Association Statement on Policies Regarding the Embargoing of Completed History PhD Dissertations, June 2013 226/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  3. 3. Open Access and the Humanities • Something needs to be done • Differences in awareness (linguistics – history) • The culture of the book • But the general principles and message is the same all over the scholarly spectrum 326/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  4. 4. Overview • A couple of initial topics • Digital sovereignty • Publishing in the digital world • Data in the publishing continuum • Why open access at all? • Looking at possible benefits for the Humanities researcher • DARIAH’s recommendations for the Humanities researchers • Back to Jussieu • Let’s talk about money… 426/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  5. 5. A COUPLE OF INITIAL TOPICS 26/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities 5
  6. 6. Digital sovereignty • Open access as practice • Let us forget about business models for a while • Open access is a normal component of the scientific process • Dissemination of scientific knowledge without barriers • Science is a public common good • Scientific results must be stored and curated on trusted (public) platforms • Scientific actors are responsible for this • Researchers, research institutions, states (research policies) 626/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  7. 7. Publishing in the digital world Main functions of scholarly journals (Mabe, 2010) Registration Dissemination Peer review Archival record Implementation in an overlay model registration with precise affiliation information: repository high visibility in search engines: repository certification by editorial committees: overlay journal long term archiving: repository Application: hal.archives-ouvertes.fr with episciences.org 726/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  8. 8. Data in the publishing continuum • Another dimension in complexity • Nothing resembles less to data than data • From digital editions of medieval manuscripts to meteorological simulations • Various sources, formats, sizes, conditions of use • Same principles apply • Openness and citation • Cf. FAIR principles • Findable, accessible, interoperable, reusable • We need this for publications as well 826/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  9. 9. WHY OPEN ACCESS FOR HUMANITIES? A couple of concrete benefits 926/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  10. 10. What are the benefits of OA for the Humanities researchers? Finding ways to release knowledge more widely and more quickly stands to bring great benefits also to the Humanities. 26/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities 10
  11. 11. A new demand for openness • Made by • Research institutions • Funders • Society at large • OA mandates and policies : ROARMAP • Open Access for publications produced in the framework of H2020- funded projects • France, Loi Pour une République Numérique: “secondary rights of use” 26/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities 11
  12. 12. Voluntary commitment is essential 26/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities 12 The researcher is the key actor of OA. http://openaccess.couperin.org/
  13. 13. 26/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities 13
  14. 14. Impact and visibility • Depositing documents in open archives • Rapidly made available online • More viewed and dowloaded 1426/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  15. 15. Sustainability • Enabling sustainable (self-)archiving of documents • Repositories, duplications, re-publishing 1526/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  16. 16. Discoverability • Opening research up to greater discoverability, via full text data mining of open resources • Cf. on-going legal limitations in the mining of scientific publications • Legal success in the UK; Progress in France (Loi pour une république numérique); Stalled situation in the EU 1626/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  17. 17. Citability • With metadata harvesting, documents deposited in open archives are more easily referenced. • Swan A. “The Open Access citation advantage: Studies and results to date”. Eprints. 2010. http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/268516/ • Gargouri Y, Hajjem C, Larivière V, Gingras Y, Carr L, Brody T, Harnad S. “Self-selected or mandated, open access increases citation impact for higher quality research”. PLoS One. 2010. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0013636 1726/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  18. 18. Usage • Having access to statistics related to the publication (like viewings or downloads) • Systematic in open archives (cf. Hal) • Statistics in Hal • Statistics in Hal: tutorial • Limits of traditional Bibliometric indicators • Altmetrics 1826/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  19. 19. Precedence • Establishing new ideas more quickly • True even if you are not concerned with patents… • Clear datation 1926/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  20. 20. Scholarly dialogue • Receiving feedback from colleagues prior to peer review • Early citations, early feedback 2026/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  21. 21. Reducing publication costs • Open access ≠ free access • Essentially additional access costs = non-existent for authors and readers 2126/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  22. 22. Various scientific contents • Enabling the deposit of any kind of scientific contents • All types of scholarly production • Articles, books, posters, conference papers, reports, working documents….etc • Doctoral and master’s thesis: easily published in OA + more visible 2226/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  23. 23. Digital sovereignty • Personal sovereignty as scholars • Increasing the impact and visibility of Humanities research work individually and collectively • Retaining their moral rights to their contents 2326/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  24. 24. WHAT CAN THE HUMANITIES RESEARCHERS DO? DARIAH’s recommandations to promote Open Access within Humanities 26/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities 24
  25. 25. Principle 1 • Systematically deposit your work in an open archive, institutional or otherwise. • Use a sustainable, free and open archive such as HAL, Zenodo, or your own university environment • Avoid private scientific social networks • No guarantees of sustainability and free access in the long run 2526/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  26. 26. Principle 2 • Deposit your work as soon as possible • As soon as it sent to your publisher • Possible to deposit you past publications and non-peer reviewed materials (or preprints) 2626/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  27. 27. Principle 3 Release your work under a license as open as possible • CC-BY is your friend 2726/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  28. 28. Principle 4 Deposit your work, even if you have published in a so- called open access journal • Deposit the full text of the author’s version • Trust your institution not your trader • Do not pay APCs (Article Processing Charges) in hybrid journals 2826/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  29. 29. L’ESPRIT DE JUSSIEU 2926/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  30. 30. L’appel de Jussieu • Jussieu Call for Open science and bibliodiversity • http://jussieucall.org • Objectives • Promoting a scientific publishing open-access model • Fostering bibliodiversity and innovation • Avoiding the exclusive transfer of journal subscription monies to APC payments • Towards a vision which is not entirely based upon a preservation of publishers’ sales revenue • “The development of innovative scientific publishing models must be a budget priority because it represents an investment into services meeting the genuine needs of researchers in our digital age” 3026/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  31. 31. Where to experiment? • writing practices (publishing associated data) • refereeing (open peer-reviewing) • content editorial services (beyond-pdf web publishing) • additional services (text mining) 3126/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  32. 32. Where could the money come from? • We call on research organizations and their libraries to secure and earmark as of now a share of their acquisition budgets to support the development of scientific publishing activities, which are genuinely open and innovative, and address the needs of the scientific community. 3226/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities
  33. 33. Where to go from here? • Think different! • Be open to novel ideas and models in the digital world • Don’t be afraid • Will my ideas be stolen if I deposit a pre-print? • Is peer review an essential aspect of science? • Do I have to cite the data sources I use? • Is CC-BY-NC-SA-ND-please-do-not-use an open licence? 3326/10/17 Open Access as practice in the Humanities

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