HEALTH, WELLNESS, AND SAFETY TRAINING FOR ECE

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Health and Wellness Practices in the D.I.R.E.C.T.I.O.N.A.L. ECE Developmental Curriculum

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  • Wellness is a complete overall state of being. It needs to be taught, as well as practiced.
  • Early Education is now a strategy that is practiced for young children.
  • Socio-Physical Aspects are what a child sees, what a child hears, and what a child believes about him/her self, which are all crucibles to wellness.
  • Nutrition, Health, and Safety are interelational
  • In order to teach the concepts of wellness, one must, be in a continued state of wellness her/him self.
  • Quality and Accountability ARE of the upmost importance
  • Children of all ages should show good progress
  • D.A.P.’s are what is required and needed
  • Children love learning when it is age and level fun
  • Young children are really imaginative, so should be the child servant
  • Responsibilities are many and need to be regularly retained
  • More responsibilities
  • Families and Community also are part of providing child with health and safety practices
  • More activities for families
  • conclusion
  • references
  • HEALTH, WELLNESS, AND SAFETY TRAINING FOR ECE

    1. 1. Nutrition, Health, and Safety Training for Early Childhood Educators Debbie LancasterEarly Childhood Education 214Inst.: WellsSept. 14, 2010<br />E.C.E. Wellness<br />9/16/2010<br />1<br />
    2. 2. Thesis<br /> “Wellness refers to optimal health and the vitality to enjoy life, is largely determined by lifestyle choices” (Sorte,<br /> Daeschel, Amador, 2011) Wellness then, is determined by the way one entreats him/her self in the choices she/he makes<br /> every day , not limited to the absence of illnesses.<br />Overall Wellness of Young Children<br /> Many of America’s children are not categorized in the “wellness” definition. Many children are lacking in basic nutriments, inoculations, health insurance, and/or financial stability(not enough income to buy adequate amounts of food). The choices that are made for them based on the former reasons are indeed causing them to be unhealthy or at the very minimum at risk for being exposed to serious deficiencies that are very limiting and have the potential for causing intellectual retarders. For these reasons many children enter the school setting without the basic adaptations for learning required for the brain to be able to process information.<br /> Role that early education setting has on young child’s health and well-being <br />Early Childhood Education is now more than children being entertained through playing while mum and pops are working. There are many Socio-Physical Aspects introduced in early childhood educational settings that help to bestow wellness to children in Early Childhood <br />9/16/2010<br />2<br />
    3. 3. Socio-Physical Aspects; purpose for practicing the concepts of Wellness in Early ChildhoodConcepts Children learn …<br />9/16/2010<br />3<br />
    4. 4. 9/16/2010<br />4<br />Purpose Cont.The Building Blocks of Children’s Growth and Development<br />(Sorte, Daeschel, and Amador-2011)<br />Nutrition=what is eaten, how it is digested and absorbed, and its’ effect on growth, development, and healthWhat a child eats must meet the child’s developmental needs for growth and correspond with the child’s metabolism<br />Health= physical and mental well-being and the absences of diseasesInoculations and hand-washing are common forms of health<br />Safety=Keeping children safe and free from the fear of harmLearning ,practicing, and maintaining rulesWELLNESS<br />
    5. 5. Wellness of Practitioners of Early Childhood Education<br />9/16/2010<br />5<br />The state of being thatone needs to be in, so that, he/she can be considered healthy and fit in heart, mind, and body; in order to teach wellness concepts to young children<br />Safety<br />Nutrition<br />Health<br />(Personal Definition)<br />
    6. 6. Considerations<br />For the development of a well-defined health, safety and nutrition early learning environment---Quality and Accountability<br />Quality and accountability can best be improved when administrators, education managers, Early Literacy Mentor-Coaches (ELMCs), teachers, home visitors, other staff, and parents: (U. S. Department of Health and Human Services)<br /> comprehend the program’s goals for children’s education and growth —particularly, the outcomes that is desired for children to accomplish; <br />convey plans for serving children so that they accomplish those outcomes due to well-made curricula and effectual instruction strategies; <br />measure children’s learning and developmental growth by way of continuing assessment; and <br />use the outcome of assessment of children’s advancement and classroom practices to sustain each child’s learning and progress for continuous program expansion. <br />9/16/2010<br />6<br />
    7. 7. Considerations Continued An outcome is a educational or developmental objective. It is a durable goal. Children become skilled and mature at diverse rates and in different ways. groups of children should make obvious noteworthy steps forward concerning the outcomes throughout their contribution in learning. <br />9/16/2010<br />7<br />
    8. 8. Developmentally Appropriate Practices(D.A.P.)<br />Developmentally appropriate practices are customs of educating children that are based on what is identified regarding children’s culture and maturity, with reference to individual children, and in relation to the community and intellectual perspective in which children exist. (as cited The Head Start Leaders Guide to Positive Child Outcomes.)<br />Developmentally appropriate practices help to guide teachers to best meet children’s needs (Sorte, en te…2011)<br />Common D.A.P.’s include but are not limited to: 1) Strategies in familiar activities such as story reading, singing together, and dramatic play 2) At the universal level, all children should receive sufficient density of positive feedback from their caregivers(as cited in Program Practices for Promoting the Social Development of Young Children and Addressing Challenging Behavior )3) At the secondary level, a social skills curriculum should be adopted and implemented.(as cited in Program Practices for Promoting the Social Development of Young Children and Addressing Challenging Behavior )4) At the tertiary (or intervention) level, assessment-based interventions that are developed through the process of Positive Behavior Support (PBS) have been shown to be effective as cited in Program Practices for Promoting the Social Development of Young Children and Addressing Challenging Behavior )<br />9/16/2010<br />8<br />
    9. 9. Learning activities which foster a young child’s understanding of the importance of physical activities, physical fitness, health, nutrition and safety.<br />9/16/2010<br />9<br />
    10. 10. Learning activities which foster a young child’s understanding of the importance of physical activities, physical fitness, health, nutrition and safety, Continued<br />EXCERISE—CIRCLE TIME GAMES SUCH AS HEAD, SHOULDERS, KNEES AND TOES<br />“SURPRISE VISTORS” SUCH AS FIREMEN AND DENTISIT’S<br />DRAMATIC PLAY WITH ITEMS OF USE IN REAL AREAS OF LIFE—HARD HATS, LIFE PERSERVERS,SAFETY GOGGLES<br />TEETH BRUSHING<br />HANDWASHING<br />GOOD ROLE MODELING<br />CLEAN-UP TIME<br />BOOK READING<br />ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF CHILD’S FEELINGS<br />A FIELD TRIP TO THE LOCAL GROCERY STORE<br />OUTSIDE PLAY WITH BALLS AND FREEDOM TO RUN<br />COOKING ACTIVITIES<br />MODELS OF THE PARTS OF THE BODY THAT FOOD EFFECTS<br />EATING FAMILY STYLE MEALS/ EAT BREAKFAST<br />USING MANNERS ALL THE TIME<br />COVER COUGHS AND SNEEZES<br />ENCOURAGE RESPECT AND TOLERANCE OF OTHERS BELIEFS AND PRACTICES<br />9/16/2010<br />10<br />
    11. 11. Teacher responsibilities<br />Provide adequate space near the preschool area to greet guests and enroll preschoolers in the appropriate class or department.<br />Store toys and other teaching materials in a wall storage unit. Only have out the materials and toys that you expect to use during the session. A wall storage unit in a classroom provides more floor space for active preschoolers.<br />Rooms should have safety electrical outlets.<br />The floor covering should be stain resistant and fire retardant, free from bold patterns and designs, easy to clean and maintain. A carpeted floor is warmer, quieter and softer for sitting. A tile floor is colder but is better for “messy” activities such as art cooking activities. A combination of both (2/3 carpet, 1/3 tile) provides for all activities. If carpeting is already on the floor, it should be vacuumed at least weekly, PERFERABLY daily<br />Consider the room’s exposure to sunlight. Use pastel colors such as blue, green, lilac and neutral colors in rooms, which may get a lot of natural light. Warm colors such as soft yellow and peach will help warm up a room where sunlight is limited. A long narrow room will appear wider when one wall is painted a different color..<br />Windows need to be clean, clear and uncovered to aid in teaching. Curtains are unnecessary because they collect dust that may create allergy problems for some preschoolers. Blinds also collect dust and must be cleaned regularly if used. Remember to keep the cords out of the reach of the preschoolers. A good height for windows is 18-20 inches from the floor. Window ledges should be flush with the wall, without molding.<br />Room needs to be equipped with furniture and equipment that is child sized<br />Requiring that parents or other authorized adults (not siblings) pick up preschoolers.<br />Requiring that preschool room doors be kept closed. (Provide a small window in the classroom door, giving a view of the entire room.)<br />Requiring a minimum of two adult teachers in a classroom at all times.<br />Asking preschool teachers to wear name badges.<br />Using volunteer or security personnel to provide assistance in church halls, entrances, and near preschool rooms.<br />Requiring that restroom doors be partially open when teacher assists child with toileting needs.<br />Information cards should include where parents can be reached, who may or may not pick up a child, allergies and any other information that helps a teacher meet the needs of the child.<br />A telephone must be in or near the preschool area. Post emergency telephone numbers—hospital, ambulance, police, fire department, and poison control center. Include a list of medical personnel within the church who may be called in an emergency.<br />Have and maintain fire extinguishers, first-aid kits, flashlight emergency lighting, smoke detectors, and radios.<br />Post an emergency escape plan in each room. Parents should know where to meet their children outside the building.<br />9/16/2010<br />11<br />
    12. 12. Teacher responsibilities continued<br />Toys should be in good repair or be removed from the room.<br />Toys should be large enough to be safe from swallowing.<br />Store cleaning and disinfecting materials on a high shelf.<br />Remove poisonous plants, litter and insect nests.<br />Check equipment for sharp edges, missing or loose parts, or deteriorated, splintered wood.<br />Cover a sandbox when not in use.<br />A minimum of two teachers should be on the playground at all times.<br /> Toys, teaching materials, equipment, walls, and floors need to be clean and ready of the child. For disinfecting, use ¼ cup household bleach to one gallon of water. The bleach solution needs to be prepared fresh each session. If there is no chlorine smell, a new solution needs to be made even if the solution were prepared fresh.<br />Wash hands after using the toilet, after wiping noses, and before eating or serving snacks or giving a bottle<br />Diaper infants in their cribs. Change older babies and ones on a non-porous surface and sanitize after each use. Use waxed paper on top of a clean diaper and slide both under the child. Roll the soiled or wet diaper in waxed paper and place in a plastic or paper bag in a covered trashcontainer. Wear disposable gloves. A new set of gloves is required for each diaper change..<br />9/16/2010<br />12<br />
    13. 13. Engaging families and community<br />Strategies to inform and engage families of and in the planning of nutritional menus for their children both in a school setting and at home<br />Devise a “community advisory committee” so that parents and community members can take part in the decision making and planning process of the menus<br />Send nutrition information materials and cafeteria menus home with students.<br />Invite parents and other family to periodically eat with their children.<br />Offer nutrition education workshops and screening services to the community.<br />Encourage participation of volunteers in food preparation and service of meals.<br />Invite parents t o come into the class and share the favourite family recipe.<br /> <br />Participate in community-based nutrition education campaigns sponsored by public health agencies or voluntary organizations such as collecting and sharing food for the socially deprived.<br /> <br />9/16/2010<br />13<br />
    14. 14. Engaging families and community continued<br />For safety developments, local health and/or fire departments could again become either “surprise” visitors to the classroom, or a planned field trip with parents. Proper techniques of installing and securing child safety seats along with information for parents about the dangers of not wearing safety seats themselves are ideal. <br />Incorporating classroom activities such as “star stamping” with apples cut by supervising adults (parent volunteers) and dipped in paint while talking with the child about what apples are (fruit) and why they are nutritious can be fun and educational<br />9/16/2010<br />14<br />
    15. 15. conclusion<br />Nutritional deficiencies can be helped by implementing and/or providing meals and snacks at appropriate times. Children are the well-spring of life. As an early childhood educational provider, knowing that many children are being affected adversely regarding health and wellness practices; one should become more determined than ever to succeed as a high-quality provider of services to children in early childhood and aspire to become a source of hope for them. One should also mandate more emphasis on adhering to wellness practices in her/his own life so that he/she can be modeling appropriate choices for children.<br />9/16/2010<br />15<br />
    16. 16. References/ResourcesSorte, J., Daeschel, I., & Amador, C. (2011). Nutrition, health and safety for young children. Pearson: Upper Saddle River. ISBN: 9780131381209 packaged with My Education Lab).  <br />U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Head Start Bureau. The Head Start Leaders Guide to Positive Child Outcomes. Washington, D.C., document was prepared under Contract No. 233-02-0002 of the Head Start Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth and Families <br /> Photos by ; T. Santiago, Archdiocese of NY/HS; T. Summers, Mooresville Family Resource Center/HS (slide 7)<br />Program Practices for Promoting the Social Development of Young Children and Addressing Challenging Behavior DeinerLow, Penny, ““Inclusive Early Childhood Education: Development, Resources, andPractices” http://books.google.com/books?id=nr9wQx_bv2kC&pg=PA104&lpg=PA104&dq=wellness+con, Retrieved August 16, 2010<br />FRESH Tools for Effective School Health, First Edition, 1 WHO, FAO and Education International, 1998. Healthy Nutrition: An Essential Element of a Health- Promoting School. WHO Information Series on School Health – Document 4.Geneva:   WHO Retrieved from http://www.unesco.org/education/fresh on August 23, 2010<br /> <br />9/16/2010<br />16<br />

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