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Step Into Security Webinar - Physical Security Integration & Access Control - Part One - Concepts & Components

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In LENSEC’s Step Into Security webinar, we take a look at integrations for physical security with a special focus on access control. In Part One, we focus on concepts and components.

Recently, access control has made big strides in technology incorporating biometrics, integrating with other security products, and moving to a digital deployment among other things. We'll provide an overview for end-users and security personnel.

LENSEC physical security expert Keith Harris will be presenting this topic. Keith is a veteran expert with extensive knowledge of security equipment. Keith has experience working with educators, law enforcement and others developing security solutions to meet their needs.

Please register for the upcoming webinar. Share this info with your colleagues and invite them to join us.

WEBINAR AGENDA:
• Access Control Deployment
• Building & Fire Codes
• Security Integration
• Choosing Components

Step Into Security Webinar Archive:
http://bit.ly/StepIntoSecurityWebinarArchive

Published in: Devices & Hardware
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Step Into Security Webinar - Physical Security Integration & Access Control - Part One - Concepts & Components

  1. 1. Physical Security Integration & Access Control --- Part 1: Concepts & Components
  2. 2. Today’s Moderator David Martin Physical Security Technical Specialist LENSEC
  3. 3. Webinar Sponsor Based in Houston, TX Since 1998 IP Video Management System Design Installation Project Management LENSEC is committed to empowering our clients and partners to prevent or mitigate physical security risks. We want to help protect people and assets as well as improve operations through our evolutionary and intuitive technology. We can do this by providing expertise in security and software development. Our Mission
  4. 4. Webinar Logistics Q&A at the end Questions for the panelist Audio from attendees muted Poll questions Survey
  5. 5. Keith Harris Marketing Manager LENSEC Today’s Panelist Expertise in Photography & Video Production Experience in Physical Security Market Trainer for Surveillance & Physical Security Techniques
  6. 6. Training Goal Physical Security Integration & Access Control Part 1: Concepts & Components Topics for Webinar: Access Control Deployment Building & Fire Codes Security Integration Choosing Components
  7. 7. Preventive Control – keeps undesirable events from happening Detective Control – identifies undesirable events that have occurred Corrective Control – corrects undesirable events that have occurred Deterrent Control – discourages security violations from taking place Recovery Control – restores resources & capabilities after an event Access Control Categories & Concepts Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  8. 8. Layers of Protection Unifying Your Security Platform Cross Functional Basic Functions - YES Advanced Features – Maybe Not Security Integration Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  9. 9. Interior Entrance/Exit Hallways Offices Access Control Environment Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  10. 10. Exterior Parking Lots Perimeter Warehouse Access Control Environment Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  11. 11. Poll Question Poll Question #1 What is the primary concern when regulating access control?
  12. 12. Building & Fire Codes Passive vs. Active Security Systems Primary Directive Rules & Standards Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  13. 13. Building & Fire Codes NFPA – National Fire Protection Association NFPA101 – Life Safety Code NFPA72 – Primarily Covers Fire Alarms IBC – International Building Code Rules & Standards Physical Security Integration & Access Control National Fire Protection Assoc. Codes & Standards: http://www.nfpa.org/codes-and-standards/document-information-pages International Building Code: http://www.iccsafe.org/codes-tech-support/codes/2015-i-codes/ibc/
  14. 14. AHJ – Authority Having Jurisdiction Rules & Standards Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  15. 15. AHJ – Authority Having Jurisdiction Fire Marshal Building Inspector Health Department Engineers/Architects Senior Executives Utility Companies Insurance Companies Rules & Standards Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  16. 16. Legacy BOCA Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) UL 294 Rules & Standards Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  17. 17. Zero Downtime High Availability Five Nines Rules & Standards Physical Security Integration & Access Control Nines Availability Downtime 1 90% 36.5 days/year 2 99% 3.65 days/year 3 99.9% 8.76 hours/year 4 99.99% 52 minutes/year 5 99.999% 5.25 minutes/year Five Nines Of High Availability 
  18. 18. 24/7 Operation Alarm Monitoring System Live Video Monitoring Video Verification Intrusion Detection & Fire Alarms Access Control Equipment Access Control System Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  19. 19. Poll Question Poll Question #2 To which side of the door are Fail Safe & Fail Secure relevant?
  20. 20. Access Control System Physical Security Integration & Access Control Fail Safe – Locks are Released Fail Secure – Locks are Secured Applies to Entry Control Only Manual Egress Allowed Mechanical Override Key Stairwell Doors Fire Doors
  21. 21. Door Types Mounting Positions Door Movement Mounting Convenience Access Control System Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  22. 22. Choosing Locks Cylindrical Lock Mortise Lock Surface Lock Deadbolt Lock Deadlatch Locks Access Control Components Physical Security Integration & Access Control Cylindrical Lock Mortise Lock Surface LockDeadbolt LockDeadlatch Lock
  23. 23. Maglocks Power Fail Safe by Default Bond Rating Door Orientation Out Swinging Door In Swinging Door (Z bracket) Double Door Maglocks Access Control Components Physical Security Integration & Access Control Maglock Armature & Magnet Z Bracket Double Maglock
  24. 24. Door Strikes Keeper Fail Safe/Fail Secure Switch Low Voltage: AC/DC Mortise Strike Surface Strike Latch Protector Access Control Components Physical Security Integration & Access Control Mortise Strike Surface Strike Latch Protector
  25. 25. Wireless Locks Integrated Locks Wireless Card Reader Interface Proprietary Wireless Frequency Wi-Fi Locks Access Control Components Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  26. 26. Other Lock Types Electronic Lockset Electronic Bolt Access Control Components Physical Security Integration & Access Control Electronic Lockset Electronic Bolt
  27. 27. Exit Devices Request To Exit Crash Bar PIR-RTE Push Button Access Control Components Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  28. 28. Credentials Form Badge, Fob, Etc. Type Prox iClass Protocol HID Global NXP Semiconductor Access Control Components Physical Security Integration & Access Control Keyfob Badge Clamshell
  29. 29. Authorization Interface Card Reader Ingress/Egress Access Control Components Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  30. 30. Authorization Interface Card Readers Wiegand Protocol OSDP Protocol Credentials Standard Proximity Smartcards Barcode/Magstripe Gesture Sensitive Access Control Components Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  31. 31. Authorization Interface Keypad Oldest & Most Common Diminished Security Password Protection Shoulder Surfing Access Control Components Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  32. 32. Authorization Interface Biometrics Fingerprint Hand Geometry Retinal Scan Iris Scan Facial Recognition Access Control Components Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  33. 33. Authorization Factors Visual Verification Multifactor Credentials Possession: Something You Have Knowledge: Something You Know Characteristic: Something You Are Trusted Verification: Someone Trusted Verifies You Access Control Concepts Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  34. 34. Authorization Factors Multifactor Credentials 2 Factors – Keyfob & PIN 3 Factors – Keyfob, PIN & Fingerprint 4 Factors – Keyfob, PIN, Fingerprint & Manned Checkpoint Access Control Concepts Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  35. 35. Door Controllers Bridge the Gap CAN Controllers Standalone Controllers Integrated Controllers Access Control Components Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  36. 36. Transmission & Networks IP-Based Transmission Power over Ethernet (PoE) 802.3af – 15.4W power 802.3at – 25.5W power Access Control Components Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  37. 37. Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  38. 38. Transmission & Networks Hardwired / Serial Connected Cable Systems 6 Conductor Cable 4 Conductor Cable / 8 Conductor Cable 2 Conductor Cable Drain Wire Access Control Components Physical Security Integration & Access Control
  39. 39. Questions Q&A
  40. 40. Contacts David Martin LENSEC (512) 318-3829 dmartin@lensec.com Keith Harris LENSEC (512) 913-3907 kharris@lensec.com
  41. 41. Thanks for Attending Today’s Webinar
  42. 42. SIS5-16 Webinar – Physical Security Integration & Access Control Part One: Concepts & Components Questions & Answers Poll Question #1 What is the primary concern when regulating access control? 1. Integrating many different building systems 2. Carefully reading the specifications 3. Life safety 4. Knowing who has jurisdiction for code enforcement Poll Question #2 To which side of the door are Fail Safe & Fail Secure relevant? 1. The entry side of the door 2. The exit side of the door 3. Both sides of the door 4. Neither side of the door Which version of the building and fire codes should I follow? That is not always an easy answer. The right thing to do is follow the version of the code that the AHJ follows. This could vary among entities. The most recent version of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code is 2015, though many jurisdictions are still working off of 2012 rules or earlier. The AHJ has the authority to adopt the code. So, when in doubt, check with the AHJ for clarification. When using a Fail Safe lock, the door becomes unlocked when there is a power failure. How does the owner prevent a security risk? I’ve seen that as a concern before. You can’t auto lock the doors in those situations because that defeats the purpose of life safety. You can provide a mechanical lock and have security or a designated person go and manually lock the doors after an inspection of the building. However, the mechanical lock should be used on a regular basis since free egress should be maintained. Fail Secure hardware locations might require a Mechanical Override Key to manually lock doors for building security when the power is down. Proper use dictates that these keys are only used on an emergency basis and held by a limited number of key holders.
  43. 43. How does access control work with building systems like the fire alarm? A fire alarm pull is not an exit device, but it works like one – sort of. The fire alarm is configured to drop lock power when the fire pull is activated. Maglocks and access control systems have contacts to tie into the fire alarm. AHJs may require proof of successful access control override by the fire pulls. When you’re choosing a wireless or WiFi lockset, do each have to be within range of the access point? Range is a consideration. Each location should be tested to make sure it is in range of the network access point. Some of these locks are designed with a MIMO style network for lock communications. This would require a system hub to located within range of every lock. A single system hub might manage 12 or more doors within its range. Are there other types of Request To Exit devices for uncommon installation circumstances? A less common device is an RTE Pressure Pad placed in front of a door to break power when a person stand on it. These work best when installed under carpets or flooring, though this might complicate maintenance. Pressure Pads might be used in areas where hand contact with the door or PIRs are not permitted, such as a clean room or explosive areas.

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