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My replication book synposis slideshow

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This is a slideshow for my first self-published book on survey research replication. In this slideshow, I summarize my book's eight chapters. The slideshow is navigable and works best in Office 365 (due to use of Zoom).

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  • To be clear, I know about the visual error on the Missing Data slide (slide #30). If my efforts were "perfect", then my work would be "timeless". However, I am not perfect...implying that I can improve, grow, and find value in my development.
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My replication book synposis slideshow

  1. 1. Welcome to a synopsis of my book
  2. 2. Quick Facts First book authored by James M. Tamayose, M.Ed. Written in American Psychological Association 6th ed. Writing Style 238 references, 13 tables, and 16 images
  3. 3. A couple of notes before going into the synopsis My book represents my abilities and limitations at the time I wrote my book. My imperfections are special to me because I can expand and contract from them.
  4. 4. Chapter 1. Book Overview Chapter 2: Replication Chapter 3: Surveys Chapter 4: Statistics Chapters 5 – 7: Examples Chapter 8: The Gems
  5. 5. Chapter 1. Book Overview Chapter 2: Replication Chapter 3: Surveys Chapter 4: Statistics Chapters 5 – 7: Examples Chapter 8: The Gems
  6. 6. Chapter 1. Book Overview Chapter 2: Replication Chapter 3: Surveys Chapter 4: Statistics Chapters 5 – 7: Examples Chapter 8: The Gems
  7. 7. Chapter 1. Book Overview Chapter 2: Replication Chapter 3: Surveys Chapter 4: Statistics Chapters 5 – 7: Examples Chapter 8: The Gems
  8. 8. Chapter 1. Book Overview Chapter 2: Replication Chapter 3: Surveys Chapter 4: Statistics Chapters 5 – 7: Examples Chapter 8: The Gems
  9. 9. Chapter 1. Book Overview Chapter 2: Replication Chapter 3: Surveys Chapter 4: Statistics Chapters 5 – 7: Examples Chapter 8: The Gems
  10. 10. Chapter 1. Book Overview Chapter 2: Replication Chapter 3: Surveys Chapter 4: Statistics Chapters 5 – 7: Examples Chapter 8: The Gems
  11. 11. Chapter 1. Book Overview (can be read on Amazon) 1. Book Structure 3. My Book’s Benefits 2. The Need for My Book 4. Why I Chose Replication 5. Why Me as Author
  12. 12. Chapter 2. Replication
  13. 13. Researchers cannot effectively conduct replication studies without knowing replication’s definitions. 2.1 Replication’s Definition Before researchers decide what to replicate, they have to know what they are about to do.
  14. 14. Replication’s multiple definitions inspire multiple kinds of replication studies 2.2 Research Replication Kinds Note: Section 2.2 has five tables describing different kinds of replication research
  15. 15. Replication is deeper than establishing confidence in research 2.3 Why do Researchers Care?
  16. 16. Aside from replicating things from earlier studies, other barriers to replication exist. 2.4 Replication is NOT Easy
  17. 17. Slide 4 Chapter 3. Surveys
  18. 18. Surveys are a vehicle for social cognition, the study of how people understand the self, others, and the interdependence between self and others (Fiske & Taylor, 2013; Markus & Kitayama, 1991). 3.1 Social Cognition Fiske, S.T. & Taylor, S.E. (2013). Social Cognition: From brains to culture (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Markus, H. R., & Kitayama, S. (1991). Culture and the self: Implications for cognition, emotion, and motivation. Psychological Review, 98(2), 224–253.
  19. 19. Researchers cannot effectively conduct replication studies without knowing replication’s definitions. 3.2 Face Validity and Pretesting
  20. 20. William Shakespeare wrote “The Taming of the Shrew” o True o False William Shakespeare wrote “The Taming of the Shrew” o False o True Version #1 Version #2 Attaining face validity: Depends on what is being studied and how well questions appear to measure whatever is being studied. Version #1 and Version #2 could establish face validity for a test on Shakespearean Literature.
  21. 21. William Shakespeare wrote “The Taming of the Shrew” o True o False Version #1 Version #2 Pre-Testing: Pre-study quality control, useful for getting feedback. Pre-testing Version #2 may elicit negative feedback from people accustomed to seeing True listed as the first option. For the formal survey administration, Version #1 may be used. William Shakespeare wrote “The Taming of the Shrew” o False o True Version #2
  22. 22. Wording differences can yield differing responses even when questions’ substantive content are the same (Schumann & Presser, 1977, 1986). 3.3 Word Choice Schuman, H., & Presser, S. (1977). Question wording as an independent variable in survey analysis. Sociological Methods and Research, 6(2), 151–170. Schuman, H., & Presser, S. (1996). Questions and answers in attitude surveys: Experiments in question form, wording, and content. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  23. 23. 3.4 Item Bias Biased Items are items with differing psychological meanings functioning differently across groups (Ackerman, 1992; Holland & Thayer, 1988; van de Vijver & Tanzer, 1997). Ackerman, T. A. (1992). A didactic explanation of item bias, item impact, and item validity from a multidimensional perspective. Journal of Educational Measurement, 29(1), 67–91. Holland, P. W., & Thayer, D. T. (1988). Differential item performance and the Mantel-Haenszel procedure. In H. Wainer & H. I. Braun (Eds.), Test validity (pp. 129–145). Hillsdale NJ: Erlbaum. van de Vijver, F. J. R., & Tanzer, N. K. (1997). Bias and equivalence in cross-cultural assessment: An overview. European Review of Applied Psychology, 47(4), 263–279.
  24. 24. A response combination is a specific way a respondent responds to a set of items. Response combinations differ conceptual from response styles and response sets. 3.5 Response Combinations From Peer and Gamliel (2011), response style, tendency to distort responses in a certain direction; response set, respondents’ desire to express a certain image to researcher(s). Peer, E., & Gambiel, E. (2011). Too Reliable to Believe? Response Bias as a Potential Source of Inflation in Paper-and-Pencil Questionnaires Reliability. Practical Assessment, Research and Evaluation. 16(9).
  25. 25. Slide 4 Chapter 4. Statistics
  26. 26. If false null hypotheses testing for significance is bad, then imagine the replicating of false null hypotheses for significance. 4.1 Null Hypotheses For surveys, false null hypotheses may be easy to set up because survey items cannot be truly isolated from the survey context.
  27. 27. Researchers cannot effectively conduct replication studies without knowing replication’s definitions. 4.2 Thoughts on Bayesian Stats
  28. 28. Creative uses of ransacking, partitioning, and the Yates’ Correction may improve data analyzability 4.3 Contingency Tables Key References used for Section 4.3 Fisher, R. A. (1954). Statistical methods for research workers. Edinburgh, UK: Hafner Publishing. Goodman, L. A. (1969). How to ransack social mobility tables and other kinds of cross – classification tables. American Journal of Sociology, 75(1), 1–40. Sharpe, D. (2015). Your Chi-Square Test is Statistically Significant: Now What? Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation, 20(8), 1–10. Yates, F. (1934). Contingency tables involving small numbers and the χ 2 test. Supplement to the Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, 1(2), 217–235.
  29. 29. 4.4 Broken Latent Variables Fundamentally, researchers cannot analyze latent variables (e.g. factors and classes) that researchers cannot describe or explain. In Section 4.4, I describe five ways (e.g. item wording and its implications; response combinations exceeding population size) that latent variables become broken.
  30. 30. A response combination is a specific way a respondent responds to a set of items. Response combinations differ conceptual from response styles and response sets. 4.5 Missing Data
  31. 31. A Multiple Imputation Shortcoming? Survey with missing data and unobserved response combinations Response combinations that were unobserved prior to multiple imputation to become observed Multiple imputation may result in Two kinds of observed response combinations: (1) Observed without imputation and (2) Observed because of imputation Are these two kinds of response combinations comparable?
  32. 32. A Maximum Likelihood Estimation Issue? Maximum likelihood estimation works around missing data (i.e. uses available data but does not lead to imputed values) Do the two tables of response combinations below differ? True-True True-False False-True False-False True-True True-False True-Miss False-True False-False False-Miss Miss-True Miss-False Miss-Miss
  33. 33. Chapter 5 – 7. Examples
  34. 34. Contains three short survey-related institutional research scenarios. Chapter 5. Institutional Research Short highlight: Grey areas of high stakes institutional research survey findings’ meaning(s) can be easily maneuvered and difficult to understand when replicated.
  35. 35. Consists of two scenarios looking at different survey research-related practices in mental health Chapter 6: Mental Health Short highlight 1: Specific response combinations are powerful Short highlight 2: Item parceling can be a dangerous practice
  36. 36. Composed of coverage on equivalence and an examination into Dr. Morris Rosenberg’s Self- Esteem Scale (RSES) Chapter 7: Cross-cultural Psychology Short highlight 1: Equivalence is not just statistical, it’s conceptual as well Short highlight 2: Cross-cultural equivalence is hard to establish, replicating it is even harder.
  37. 37. The Gems are a collection of valuable thoughts that I could not fit into one of the other chapters. In my book’s earlier drafts, I incorporated The Gems into the text but doing so resulted in mixing scholarly and anecdotal content. For myself, keeping The Gems separate taught me about writing efficiency. Chapter 8. The Gems

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